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Research Guides

Open, Free & Affordable Course Materials

Selective list of major OER repositories, sources of open university courseware, and zero-to-low cost material licensed by the University of Toronto.

MERLOT

The MERLOT Collection contains over 40,000 teaching and learning materials in: academic support, arts, business, education, humanities, mathematics, science and technology, and the social sciences.

MIT OpenCourseWare

 MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) is a web-based publication of virtually all MIT course content. OCW is open and available to the world and is a permanent MIT activity.

Open.UToronto

Open.UToronto is a University of Toronto initiative that promotes the discovery, use, creation and sharing of openly licensed learning modules and texts for STEM and the social sciences. 

Open Education Consortium

The Open Education Consortium, in collaboration with MERLOT, is a resource pool and search engine that currently indexes open course materials from over 200 global universities. 

The Open University's OpenLearn

The Open University's OpenLearn provides materials for over 1,000 courses that cover a wide range of interdisciplinary material. This includes: arts and humanities, business and management, engineering and technology, science and math, among others.

FADIS

FADIS is a learning management and courseware system developed for image based teaching of art and architecture. The goal of FADIS is the creation of a freely available common repository and delivery system for education and research available to contributing institutions. The current repository holds over 200,000 digital objects.

TBYResources

TBYResources contains a variety of open multimedia, web 2.0, digital literacy and education content resources. It also contains class resources divided by subjects including: math, science, literature, history, and so on.

The Open Syllabus Project

The Open Syllabus Project is an effort to make the intellectual judgment embedded in syllabi relevant to broader explorations of teaching, publishing, and intellectual history. The project has collected over one million syllabi in order to extract citations and other metadata from them. Its public search engine is called the Syllabus Explorer.