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Research Guides

In the Loop: News for UTL Staff

Week of November 19 - 23, 2018

Phishing Message Targeting Library Staff

Dear Colleagues,

Please be aware that some staff have recently received phishing attacks purporting to come from Larry Alford. These attacks address the recipient personally, and request assistance with purchasing gift cards. Other senior university administrators have also been impersonated by this phishing attack.

These messages are not legitimate, and we advise you to disregard and delete any such messages that you receive. You can view an example of such a message here: https://securitymatters.utoronto.ca/phish-senior-official-impersonation/

As always, we encourage you to practice vigilance towards unfamiliar or untrustworthy email. If you are ever uncertain about the legitimacy of a message, we recommend that you contact the individual from which the message appears to originate, or else feel welcome to contact ITS support at 416-978-5555, or itshelp@library.utoronto.ca.

Additional resources on campus-wide information security awareness are available here:
http://securitymatters.utoronto.ca/

And through the UofTCyberAware Twitter channel here:
https://twitter.com/UofTCyberAware

Week of November 12 - 16, 2018

USW General Membership Meeting – December 13, 2018

Date: November 12, 2018

To: Professional & Managerial Staff

Cc: HR Divisional Offices

From: Kelly Hannah-Moffat, Vice-President, Human Resources & Equity

Re: USW General Membership Meeting – December 13, 2018

I am writing to inform you that the United Steelworkers Local 1998 is holding a General Membership Meeting requiring release time for December 13, 2018 at 3:30 pm.

Locations are as follows: 

  • St. George Campus: 25 Cecil St.
  • UTM: DV3129
  • UTSC: Room MW229

In accordance with the ‘Letter of Understanding: Union Meetings’ of the Staff-Appointed Collective Agreement between the United Steelworkers and the University of Toronto, "employees will be given time off (not to exceed two (2) hours), with no loss of regular straight time pay, up to three (3) times per year to attend General Membership Meetings of the Local Union".

There is no comparable clause in the Casual collective agreement. However, casual employees may attend on their own time if they are not scheduled or required to work. 

The link to this information may be found at http://www.hrandequity.utoronto.ca/news/usw-general-membership-meeting-dec-13/.


2018 STAR Award Reception

At the 2018 New Hires’ Tea and STAR Award reception, staff from across UTL were introduced to new colleagues and had a chance to celebrate some of the exciting projects taking place across our three campuses. This year’s STAR Awards event was an opportunity to acknowledge the exceptional and wide-ranging work of eight teams and to announce the winners.

Innovation Award:

Winner: Family Study Space

The Family Study Space is a group study room developed to provide students with care-giving responsibilities a comfortable and flexible space to use at Robarts Library – the first such space in an academic library in Canada. The initiative stood out for its responsiveness, ingenuity, and collaborative success.

Discover Archives

Discover Archives unites archival collections across all three campuses through a single, online point of entry. The new site now describes more than 2,000 collections and fonds, and is growing. The Committee was struck by Discover Archives’ impressive contributions to enhancing discoverability for researchers, as well as the level of cross-campus collaboration required by a project of this scale.

Centre for Industrial Relations and Human Resources’ Changing Face of Work Exhibit

The Changing Face of Work exhibit highlights 50 years of teaching and research at the Centre for Industrial Relations and Human Resources by examining the evolution of work. The exhibit effectively combined physical and digital elements for high-impact, while also presenting opportunities for future partnerships and collaborations.

Faculty of Music’s Undergraduate Research Showcase

The Undergraduate Research Showcase was a popular event that encouraged and promoted research-related activities amongst undergraduate students. The project demonstrates the strength of the partnership between the Music Library and its faculty, as well as the Library’s enthusiasm to not just support, but also celebrate, undergraduate research.

Library Services Platform (LSP) Request for Information Team

In planning for UTL’s new library services platform, the LSP RFI team took on the monumental task of compiling UTL’s broad functional requirements and putting together an impressive RFI. The STAR Committee was struck by the coordination and collaboration required by such a large team, over 60 members in all, and how well they successfully took a forward-looking approach to what was a complex, but critical task.

Scholars Portal Books Platform Redevelopment Team

Built on collaborative work across the OCUL community, the Scholars Portal Books platform houses a preeminent collection of digital books at the University of Toronto Libraries. This year, the Redevelopment Team completed the work of building a new platform that makes it easier for researchers to access those resources. The project is an example of high-level collaboration that combines technical innovation with thoughtful consideration for the end-user.

On-going Excellence Award:

Winner: Information Commons Help Desk

The Information Commons Help Desk team provides excellent technology support to users across the University community through their walk-in, telephone, and email assistance. Their essential contributions and close collaboration in helping to plan the University’s migration to Office 365, including project planning, documentation, and front-line support, were key in ensuring this successful transition. The team’s role in this project is illustrative of their consistent dedication and engagement in providing support to users at U of T.

Science Literacy Week Team

Science Literacy Week started with Jesse Hildebrand, a student, and his idea to celebrate science with the support of librarians at Gerstein. It’s now the largest science event in Canada with over 800 events in over 100 cities. In Jesse’s letter of support, he wrote about how he approached the library with this idea and the impact of their support. Quoting from this letter - “without that initial meeting and without the tireless support both in 2014 and since that Gerstein and other U of T Libraries have provided, none of this would be happening.”

UTL’s Science Literacy Week team has since grown to include representatives from colleges, all three campuses, and across the UTL system, and they continue to put on an incredible week of events. 

The STAR Committee would once again like to congratulate nominees and winners on all the extraordinary work accomplished! We would also like to give special thanks to Lesley Falkner for all of her crucial help organizing the STAR Award reception.


Chief Librarian Larry Alford gives keynote address at Peking University Library's International Conference on User-Oriented Information Services

Contributed by Stephen Qiao

During the last week of October, Chief Librarian Larry Alford and Stephen Qiao, Chinese Studies Librarian attended the International Conference on User-Oriented Information Services at Peking University Library, as well as a celebration of the Library’s 120th anniversary.

Larry delivered a keynote speech at the conference titled ‘Whither Libraries: Will They Wither or Thrive?’ The presentation addressed opportunities and challenges for academic libraries now and in the future.

The two-day conference covered such topics as cooperation and sharing of library resources for East Asian libraries, digital humanities and libraries, and the library’s new role and new value as a resource and service provider. Over 300 library administrators and librarians from Harvard, Princeton, Yale, Columbia, Cornell, Pittsburgh, George Washington, University of Chicago, Stanford, UC Berkeley, UCLA, University of Washington, University of Hong Kong and major academic libraries in China attended the conference and panel discussions.


Correspondence from famed Irish poet Seamus Heaney now part of the E.J. Pratt Library's Special Collections

collection of correspondence from famed Irish poet Seamus Heaney as well as special edition collections of Heaney poetry, reviews of his work and memorabilia donated by Dr. Ann Saddlemyer is now part of Special Collections at E.J. Pratt Library, Victoria University. The Ann Saddlemyer fonds consists of records that reflect her close friendship with Seamus Heaney. It includes correspondence with Heaney and his family, drafts of Heaney's poetry, reviews and articles written about Heaney, and photographs of Heaney's personal and work life. 


U of T to ban smoking on all campuses in the new year

The university has announced that it plans to ban smoking starting on January 1, 2019 including the areas surrounding the libraries. The policy would apply to the smoking or holding of lighted tobacco or cannabis, and the use of an e-cigarette or other vaping device.

The ban makes exceptions for Indigenous ceremonial activities and medical accommodation. The policy also allows for each of the three campuses to decide whether to bring in outdoor designated smoking areas during a transitional period.

[read more]

Week of November 5-9, 2018

Strategic Planning survey - please share your thoughts!

Dear colleagues,

At the Town Hall on November 15, UTL will be launching its next round of strategic planning.

The Strategic Planning Steering Committee is in the early stages of developing a planning process and we’re seeking input from the UTL community. We hope you’ll share your ideas via the short survey linked below. The survey should take about five minutes to complete and responses are anonymous.

Survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/UTLplanning

The deadline to complete the survey is Tuesday, November 13.

We appreciate your suggestions and ideas as we begin the planning process.

Sincerely,
The Strategic Planning Steering Committee
planUTL@library.utoronto.ca

Week of October 29 - November 2, 2018

Statement on the Pittsburgh Shooting

A message from Larry Alford, Chief Librarian

Dear Colleagues,

I am forwarding to you President Gertler’s statement on the horrific shooting which took place at a synagogue in Pittsburgh this weekend. I join him in extending my deepest condolences to the family and friends of those who lost their lives, and to the Jewish community at the University of Toronto and beyond. Sadly, we have learned that a U of T alumna, Joyce Fienberg, was among those who died.

I know that we all are deeply saddened by this horrible event. As I have said before, violence based on hate is deeply unsettling and completely unacceptable. We must all speak out against antisemitism and identity-based hatred whenever we witness it.

I am glad to be part of a community here at the university and the library, where we stand against hatred. We will remain steadfast in our commitment to create inclusive and welcoming spaces in which all are valued and respected.

I invite you to read President Gertler’s Statement on the Pittsburgh Shootings.

I also encourage anyone in need of personal support, including counseling or chaplaincy services, to access our local resources:

Sincerely yours, 

Larry

Larry P. Alford
Chief Librarian
University of Toronto


Town Halls on the University Pension Plan

Date:
October 22, 2018
To:
Participants in the University of Toronto Pension Plan
From:
Angela Hildyard, Special Advisor to the President & Provost, University of Toronto
Re:
Town Halls on the University Pension Plan

 

The University of Toronto, University of Guelph and Queen’s University, together with their faculty associations, the United Steelworkers (USW) and representatives of the non-unionized employees at the three universities (through the Ontario Association of Non-Unionized University Employees) – are working diligently to develop a new pension plan that would cover employees at all three universities, The University Plan Ontario (UPP).

This new pension plan, which would be a jointly sponsored multi-employer pension plan (JSPP), is a type of defined benefit (DB) plan, and it represents a unique opportunity to reshape and sustain the retirement income system in the Ontario university sector.  It is the same model used by other notable pension plans such as the Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan, OMERS (municipal employees) and CAAT (colleges). Once it is up and running, it will be available to other Ontario universities as well.

Benefits that are already earned under existing plans will not change. The pension benefits of retired members also will not change.

The University of Toronto is holding a series of information sessions for all employees on the pension plan proposal.  Members will be part of a consent process that is expected to begin in early 2019.

Campus

Date

Group

Time

Location

St. George

November 2 

Faculty

10 am -12 pm

OISE, G162

 

 

All

 2 pm - 4 pm

MSB 3154

 

November 5

All

 2 pm - 4 pm

OISE G162

 

 

 

 

 

UTM

November 12

Faculty

10 am -12 pm

UTM Room, William G. Davis Building

 

 

All

 2 pm - 4 pm

UTM Room, William G. Davis Building

 

November 14

Retirees

10 am - 11:30 am

UTM Room, William G. Davis Building

 

 

 

 

 

UTSC

November 26

Faculty

10 am -12 pm

EV 152

 

 

All

2 pm - 4 pm

EV 152

 

November 27

Retirees

2 pm - 4 pm

HW 305

 

Information about the proposed pension plan is available on the UPP website, where you can sign up to receive updates. You also can find information at pension.hrandequity.utoronto.ca/upp/.

If you have not already done so, we encourage you to visit these sites and participate in the ongoing discussions.


UTFA Meetings for Librarians on the Pension Plan

In addition to the sessions above, UTFA is organizing meetings to discuss the new Jointly Sponsored Pension Plan with librarians at our three campuses. We are currently working on a date for UTM, but we have the two following dates. Please mark your calendars and join us if you are free. You are free to join any of the sessions available:

  • UTSC Librarians Meeting, Monday, November 5 - 10 am to 12:00 noon, Room AC286A
  • St. George Librarians Meeting, Wednesday, November 14, 10 am to 12 noon, Room:  P115 in Jackman Hall, lower level (seats 76), Faculty of Law, 78 Queens Park
  • UTM (date and location to be confirmed)

Course Readings: Priority Service Date for Winter 2019 Syllabus Service

Please share with faculty in your liaison areas: 

Make your course readings available to students while respecting Canadian copyright law and U of T licensing agreements and policies.

The Priority Service Date for Winter 2019 is December 1. Please see submission instructions at uoft.me/syllabusservice.

Week of October 22 - 26, 2018

Ontario University Libraries openly release over seven decades of historical public opinion polls and guide

In advancement of library open access and collaborative stewardship of digital data in Canada, Ontario university libraries are pleased to announce the release of over seven decades of important public opinion data to the broader academic community and the public.

Included in the collection are the historical Canadian Gallup polls, covering the years 1945 to 2000, held at the Carleton University MacOdrum Library, and now available for open research reuse via the ODESI data portal. Additional polling collections that have been made available include the Canadian Opinion Research Archive (CORA) at Queen’s University, Angus Reid, IPSOS Reid, Leger Marketing, and IPSOS Canada at Wilfrid Laurier University. Together these opinion polls provide a rich historical resource for researchers across Canada and the world, covering topics such as Canadian politics, government, elections, culture, sports, the environment, health care, social and economic policy, education, and much more. Geographic coverage of the collection spans every Province and Territory, supporting national research, regional, and international comparisons.

Supporting access to the collections, the Ontario Data Community (a group of academic libraries in Ontario that coalesces initiatives and activities related to digital research data), has put together an informative Guide to Canadian Public Opinion Polls for polls held at Ontario Council of University (OCUL) libraries and available in ODESI. The guide introduces users to this collection by highlighting popular topics and innovative data visualizations of research use cases, and provides instructions on how to access these polls.

About ODESI

ODESI is an open data repository for social science survey data built and developed by the Scholars Portal service of the Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL). Collections are contributed and curated by Ontario library staff and students, using best practices and standards including the Data Documentation Initiative (DDI) metadata standard for description of datasets.

A new release of the ODESI platform includes a section highlighting the Public Opinion Poll (POP) collection and guide.

More Information

An open informative webinar will be hosted by Scholars Portal and OCUL contributing institutions on October 26 at 10 am EST to provide more information about the collections and how to access the data. No registration is required.

For more information about the collections and contributors please refer to the project information found on the Polls Guide.


Canadian Library Workers Day – October 19, 2018

Dear colleagues,

October 19 has been proclaimed Canadian Library Workers Day by the Canadian Federation of Library Associations (CFLA).

In its announcement of the event, the CFLA quotes Neil Gaiman as saying, “Libraries are about freedom. Freedom to read, freedom of ideas, freedom of communication. They are about education, about entertainment, about making safe spaces, and about access to information.”

Indeed, this speaks to some of the core values of our profession. It is through your work that this incredible level of access to, and free exchange of information is made possible.

I would like to extend my sincere appreciation to the entire U of T library system team for your excellent work this past year, and over the years. Our large, interdisciplinary team is approximately 900 people strong across our tri-campus system.

Whether you work behind the scenes or on the front lines, all of you are vital to the success of the library system in our mission to support research, teaching and learning at the University. I am deeply appreciative of your work and your commitment to collegiality, innovation and leadership, as well as to the students and faculty at the University of Toronto.

With best regards,

Larry P. Alford

Chief Librarian

University of Toronto Libraries


U of T Libraries hires its first Wikipedian-in-Residence  

Wikipedia is often the starting point for research for our users and is used to discover a variety of information sources. In order to meet our users where they are and increase the discovery and use of our rich online open access primary source collections, the U of T Libraries has hired its first Wikipedian-in-Residence for the 2018-2019 academic year.   

The Wikipedian-in-Residence, a GSLA working in Library Communications, will work to ensure the presence of U of T Libraries resources and collections in the Wikipedian community through a range of activities, such as researching collections and articles to be shared with the Wikipedia community; adding content to the Wikimedia Commons and Wikisource sites from U of T Libraries' special collections; implementing new strategies to improve U of T Libraries' Wikipedia presence, and promoting participation in new or existing WikiProjects related to the holdings of the U of T Libraries.  

Alex Jung, an MA candidate in Political Science, is the first student to hold this position. Many of the collections he will be adding to Wikipedia were organized by Digital Curation TALint student Guita Lamsechi, who also partnered with the Toronto Science Policy Network (TSPN) and student groups to host a Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon held at the Inforum.   

If you would like to contribute collection or article suggestions or get involved with editing Wikipedia articles, please contact Jesse Carliner.


CUPE 1230 Full-time and Part-time Employee Training and Development Survey

Posted on behalf of Julie Hannaford, Neil Romanosky & Darlene Chow

Please distribute to your supervisors/managers who supervise CUPE Local 1230 Full-Time and Part-Time staff.

On Monday October 29, 2018, the members of CUPE Local 1230 Full-Time and Part-Time bargaining unit will be sent an email from Wasyl Sydorenko, CUPE 1230, President, asking members to participate in an online survey regarding the Job-Related Training and Development. The link to the survey will be included in the email.  Data from this survey will be used by the joint University-CUPE 1230 Working Group (Darlene Chow, Julie Hannaford, Neil Romanosky, Wasyl Sudorenko, Richard Hydal, and Kyla Jemison) to determine how best to use the $25,000 made available in the current collective agreement for job-related training and development. 

Please encourage your CUPE 1230 Full-time and Part-time employees to take time to complete the survey. The survey is short and will take about 5-10 minutes to complete.  The link to the survey will be included in Wasyl’s email.

Thank you for your cooperation.

Week of October 15-19, 2018

Municipal Election - October 22, 2018

Date: October 18, 2018

To: Professional & Managerial Staff; Chief Administrative Officers (via the CAO listserv)

From: Kelly Hannah-Moffat, Vice-President, Human Resources & Equity

Re: Municipal Election – October 22, 2018

Please distribute widely:

In the forthcoming Municipal Election on Monday, October 22, 2018, voting hours will run from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Electors must vote in the ward they live in.

Section 50 of the Municipal Elections Act, 1996 outlines voting absent entitlements for employees:

“(1) An elector whose hours of employment are such that he or she would not otherwise have three consecutive hours to vote on voting day is entitled to be absent from work for as long as is necessary to allow that amount of time.

(2) The absence shall be timed to suit the employer’s convenience as much as possible.”

Please ensure that all employees throughout your division whose normal work schedule would not allow them the three consecutive hours as outlined above are excused from work at an appropriate time in order to comply with the Act.

For the majority of employees whose normal work day ends at 5 p.m., no time off is required.

Information on who can vote, how to vote, and voting options and accommodations is available on the City of Toronto website

Week of October 1 - 5, 2018

Robarts Library organizes LGBTQ2S+ escape room game for Queer Orientation

Last Monday, as part of U of T’s week-long Queer Orientation, thirty students raced against the clock at Robarts Library while playing Panic: An LGBTQ2S+ Escape Room Game. Students learned about using the library and our LBTQ+ collections while solving challenging puzzles. Game players searched the Robarts building, and the physical and online collections for clues to help them discover the combinations to a series of locks. When all the locks were opened students could open a box containing a combination to a locker in the Robarts stacks that contained the “lost” scholarship of some of the most important queer and trans theorists. The winning team won gift certificates to Toronto’s Glad Day Books, the world’s oldest LGBT+ bookstore. After the game, students socialized and enjoyed pizza and snacks while experiencing the library as a safe and inclusive place.

The game was organized by User Services Librarian Ben Walsh, Assistant Media Archivist Rachel E. Beattie, and Communications & User Services Librarian Jesse Carliner. The game was designed by Ben Walsh who previously ran similar activities for orientation at the Engineering and Computer Science Library. An escape room game for all U of T students is also scheduled to take place in October at Robarts Library.

Queer Orientation (QO) week is a tri-campus series of events for new and returning students, staff and faculty to make connections, engage in activities and have discussions related to LGBTQ+ communities. This year marked the 12th annual Queer Orientation week with 42 events across all three campuses.

If you, your library, or your department would like to be involved in Queer Orientation next year, please contact Communications and User Services Librarian Jesse Carliner for more information. If you would like to learn more about using UTL’s Breakout EDU game design kits in your library or department, please contact User Services Librarian Ben Walsh.


Multilingual guided audio tours of Robarts Library now available

Students who missed the September tours of Robarts Library can now tour Robarts Library at their convenience with our new multilingual audio tours.

Audio tours of Robarts Library are available on the library website, with options in English, Mandarin, Cantonese, and Korean (a French-language tour will be available in the future). The tours range from 10 to 15 minutes in length, and are accompanied by a transcript for accessibility. They provide an overview of Robarts Library for new users, with topics including navigating the library and accessing help within the library.

Thank you to everyone who contributed to the project!

Jesse Carliner, Communications and User Services Librarian

Heather Buchansky, Student Engagement Librarian

Francesca Kennedy, Graduate Student Library Assistant, Communications

Amanda Wagner, Graphic Designer

English tour script and narration: Francesca Kennedy

Korean tour translation and narration: Keum Tae Hwang

Mandarin tour translation and narration: Zhuohua Yang

Cantonese tour translation: Audrey Leung, Fiona Fok and Desmond Chan

Cantonese tour narration: Audrey Leung

Additional translation support and coordination provided by:

Hana Kim, Director, East Asian Library

Stephen Qiao, Librarian, China Studies, East Asian Library

Helen Tang, Public Service Librarian, East Asian Library


PJRC Update No. 11, Fall 2018

The Petro Jacyk Central & East European Resource Centre is pleased to share its latest newsletter with the UTL community. The current issue of the PJRC Update (no. 11, Fall 2018) focuses largely on special collections. It includes the following articles along with an index to back issues from 2008 to 2017.

  • New Primary Sources for the Study of Post-WWII Ukrainian Refugees
  • Prof. T. Lahusen's Collection on Vasilii Azhaev's "Far from Moscow"
  • Stalin: Man of Letters. The Stalin Digital Archive
  • By the Grace of God, We, the Great Sovereign, Tsar...

iSchool announcement: Acting Dean

Professor Kelly Lyons has been appointed as the Acting Dean of the iSchool until December 31, 2018.


Strategic planning update

Collaboration. Inclusion. Evidence. Hopeful.  

The above are just a few of the values and attributes that surfaced in the initial meeting of the UTL Strategic Planning Steering Committee on September 20. Plato once said, “The beginning is the most important part of the work.” And while the entirety of UTL’s strategic planning process will consist of extremely valuable work, we thought it important to mark the beginning of our work as a committee by articulating some values and attributes that we would like to guide and inform (along with UTL’s existing Service Values) both the strategic planning process and the resulting plan. We also discussed at length the importance of broad engagement both across UTL and the University in the development of this plan, the need for strong assessment, and the importance of alignment with the priorities of our users and the University. As our work progresses, we will be providing updates on opportunities for everyone at UTL to be part of this process. Information will be available via In The Loop, our Confluence site, and by email. Please also feel free to contact any member of the Steering Committee with your thoughts and questions.

In the meantime, please have a look at our full list of values and attributes and consider the following: What would you would like to see embodied in the strategic plan, the process that will inform it, and in our organization in the years to come? We’d love to hear from you!

- An update from the Central Libraries' Strategic Planning Steering Committee 

Week of September 17 - 21, 2018

Call for participants: UTL AI Interest Group

By now, we have all heard and seen much about how artificial intelligence (AI) is transforming our world.

While stories of self-driving cars and Jeopardy!-winning computer systems are certainly intriguing, there are equally compelling advances in teaching, learning, and research that are changing the face of higher education and industry, all of which will also have a great impact on academic libraries in the years to come. While the exact nature of those changes is still unknown, it seems to be a good time to have broad discussions at UTL about how we might adapt and learn in the “AI era.”

What is it?  The group will have a journal club format, with one or two readings, provided in advance, which will anchor and shape each discussion. 

There are no deliverables expected from the group, other than shared learning and idea generation about what AI will mean for our users and our work going forward. Hopefully we’ll also have some fun in this conversational learning process!

Who can attend? Attendance is open to anyone who works at UTL. For the purposes of space and having a manageable size conversational group, attendance will be limited to 25 people on a first-come, first-served basis. This is not a standing committee or working group, so there is no set membership. I will lead the first session.

Do I need to have a certain level of “AI literacy” in order to attend? Definitely not! Just come with a curiosity about the topic, some questions and thoughts from the readings, and a willingness to participate in collegial discussion. A mix of colleagues and experiences with the topic should make for great discussions!

When is it and how to I sign up? The initial meeting will be Tuesday, October 9, 4-5pm in the Alice Moulton Room, Gerstein Science Information Centre.

Please sign up by adding your name to the list here. There is also a wait list should we need it. If you sign up and decide not to attend, please remove your name and let me know, so I can manage the wait list. We will aim to meet twice each in the Fall and Winter terms.

What are the readings?: Our first session will focus on innovations in--and ruminations on—AI in teaching and learning:

Aoun, Joseph. “A Learning Model for the Future.” In Robot-proof: Higher education in the age of artificial intelligence. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press, 2017.

**This is Chapter 4 of the book, which is available as an ebook through UTL: http://go.utlib.ca/cat/11654029

Mcmurtrie, Beth. “How Artificial Intelligence Is Changing Teaching.” The Chronicle of Higher Education, August 12, 2018. https://www-chronicle-com.myaccess.library.utoronto.ca/article/How-Artificial-Intelligence-Is/244231

Please email Neil Romanosky with any questions. 


Associate Chief Librarian for Special Collections and Director of the Thomas Fisher Library search committee appointed 

Dear Colleagues,

As you are aware, Loryl MacDonald has served as the Interim Associate Chief Librarian for Special Collections and Director of the Thomas Fisher Library since Anne Dondertman’s retirement. Following a call for nominations, I am pleased to announce the appointment of a Search Committee to conduct a search to fill this very important position. I want to thank all of you who expressed interest in serving on the committee. The committee will begin its work shortly.

With best regards,

Larry P. Alford

Chief Librarian

University of Toronto Libraries

CONSULTATIVE COMMITTEE: ASSOCIATE CHIEF LIBRARIAN FOR SPECIAL COLLECTIONS AND DIRECTOR, THOMAS FISHER RARE BOOK LIBRARY

CHAIR: Larry P. Alford, Chief Librarian

TEACHING STAFF:

Professor Suzanne Akbari, Director, Centre for Medieval Studies

Professor Charlie Keil, Principal of Innis College

ASSOCIATE CHIEF LIBRARIAN: Julie Hannaford, Deputy Chief Librarian

DEPARTMENT HEAD: Pearce Carefoote, Head, Rare Books and Special Collections

LIBRARIANS:

Alexandra Carter, Science and Medicine Librarian, Fisher Library

David Fernandez, Rare Book Librarian, Fisher Library

John Shoesmith, Outreach Librarian, Fisher Library

Brock Silversides, Department Head, Media Commons

NON-LIBRARIANS:

Megan Campbell, Director of Advancement, U of T Libraries, PM

Rachel Beattie, Assistant Media Archivist, Fisher, USWA

Tys Klumpenhouwer, University Archives Archivist, USWA

John Toyonaga, Manager, Binding Section, Fisher Library, PM    


Quercus and library course reserves integration

The Library Course Reserves system, also referred to as LOCR, is now integrated into Quercus. Students can now easily access their assigned readings directly from their course pages in Quercus.

Instructors who are using Library Course Reserves to make their readings available must follow a few simple steps to activate this application in their course.

While our previous method of providing direct links to course reading lists still works, adding the app to a course page is now the preferred access method we are promoting to instructors, as it performs optimally and is more stable.

Over this past weekend, Library Course Reserves had an access outage, which is now resolved. However, if you become aware of instructors or students experiencing access issues, please refer them to this page on accessing online course readings.

Week of September 10 - 14, 2018

Robarts Library extended hours service resumes

On Sunday, September 16, the Extended Hours Service resumes at Robarts Library. The hours of service are Sundays 10:00 pm to 8:30 am and Mondays - Thursdays from 11:00 pm to 8:30 am.  

As access to the library spaces are limited to current students, staff and faculty members until the library opens at 8:30 am, all staff entering Robarts on the 1st floor, St. George Street level, must provide a TCard or library staff ID card to the building patrol on duty. The 2nd floor portico entrances open at 7:30 am and staff ID should be provided to the library staff at the 2nd floor entrance/exit desk.

Thank you for your co-operation in keeping our spaces secure and safe.

Lari Langford

Head, Access and Information Services

Robarts Library


New deceptive journals checklist

The University of Toronto Libraries recently partnered with the Office of the Vice-President, Research and Innovation to develop a checklist that helps researchers identify some of the typical practices used by deceptive publishers (also commonly referred to as “predatory journals”) so researchers  can avoid submitting manuscripts to these journals. Feedback from target groups of faculty and students was obtained and incorporated.

This deceptive journals checklist is available for download and has been released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 International License.

Please share widely or incorporate into your teaching and consultations.

The webpage will be further developed in the coming months with additional material. Posters that can be shared with faculty and posted in your space are also forthcoming.

We would like to thank Maureen Morin for her support in the design of this checklist and promotional materials. 

Thank you,

Deceptive Journals Working Group members: Heather Cunningham, Lori Ferris, Eva Jurczyk, Rhain Louis, and Stephanie Orfano


Copyright resources update

Please note that in recent days the Division of the Vice-President & Provost updated their website and as a result, the link to the University of Toronto Fair Dealing Guidelines has been modified. The Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office has updated library webpages and other relevant copyright resources to reflect these changes. If you have links to copyright resources on your library webpages or resources, please update them with new links.

It is essential that faculty, instructors, and staff have access to the most up-to-date copyright resources available to them, particularly at this time of year when many copying decisions are being made. We recommend sharing http://uoft.me/copyrighthelp with users to ensure that they are accessing the most accurate resources.  The Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office updates and manages the content in most of these resources.

Updated direct link to Fair Dealing Guidelines: http://uoft.me/copyfair

A reminder that the following resources have recently been updated and are available to users:

Copyright Resources

University of Toronto Fair Dealing Guidelines

Produced by the Office of the Provost in 2012 and lay out the University's fair dealing policy.

Copyright Basics and FAQ

Produced by the University of Toronto legal counsel, this FAQ provides in depth information on copyright issues. 

Copyright Roadmap

The Copyright Roadmap is designed to assist in decision making when selecting resources and potentially copying material for use in teaching and research activities. Updated April 2018. 

Use of Audiovisual Material on Campus

This policy outlines the use of audiovisual material, including FAQs. Created in consultation with the Office of the Provost, the University of Toronto legal counsel, outside counsel, and the Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office.  

List of Copy Shops Licensed by Access Copyright

This is a list of copy shops in the Toronto area with a current Access Copyright License. It is important to note that the University continues to work closely with the University of Toronto Bookstore to provide course materials to students.  

To produce a course pack, refer to the U of T Bookstore for further guidance. You may also contact CSPI directly at 416-929-2774 or email info@coursepack.ca. You are encouraged to contact them for your course pack needs.

University of Toronto School of Graduate Studies (SGS) Thesis Copyright Guide

Find resources to help with managing copyright and permissions issues during your Electronic Thesis and Dissertation (ETD) submission process. 

Week of September 4 - 7, 2018

Countdown to Quercus: Update on library content and training sessions

The University of Toronto moved to a new Learning Management Engine (LME), called Quercus (powered by Canvas) which replaces Portal (powered by Blackboard) on Saturday, September 1, 2018.

Library content in Quercus
Course Reserves

The library course reserves application is currently being integrated into Quercus for easy access to course readings. While the integration is in process, the library can still make course readings available. More information on the process is outlined on this webpage, which will appear in all Quercus courses in a ‘Library Resources’ section (in the announcements area in the right sidebar) until the integration is complete.

Library Resources

What will happen to Fix-it?

The ‘Fix-it’ tool that was used to customize the Library Resources feed in Portal will not be migrated over into Quercus. The tool will be phased out due to security issues. Please note that if you are using a public link that was created from public view of library resources page, it will no longer be active after October 3, 2018. In its place we will be using the Library Resources application.

Library Resources Application

The new Library Resources application in Quercus will initially contain this general ‘Library Resources’ LibGuide . For customized/subject-specific library resources, you will eventually be able to create a course LibGuide, which will be integrated into the Quercus course once the ‘Library Resources’ application is ready.
This application will not be in place for the Quercus launch date on September 1. We will let you know when it is ready to be integrated in the weeks ahead. In the meantime, this webpage (which also contains the Course Reserves info) will appear in all Quercus courses in a ‘Library Resources’ section (in the announcements area in the right sidebar) as a placeholder.

More information and documentation on the new Library Resources application, along with how to automatically embedding any course-specific LibGuides into Quercus courses, will be shared closer to the Library Resources application launch date.

Additional library info for Quercus

There is now a ‘Librarian’ role in Quercus. Note that library staff can request additional roles (i.e. Designer or Teacher) if they are heavily embedded in the course.  More information on roles and permissions are outlined in this chart.

To assist with the LME migration from Portal to Quercus, please review all of your LibGuides and the webpages you are in charge of and replace the word ‘Portal’ with ‘Quercus’ along with the new link (https://q.utoronto.ca/)  as soon as you can.

 
Quercus training sessions

(Note: training session info in this section pertains mainly to St. George campus)

General Quercus training sessions will continue to be offered in September, either in-person or online. Refer to the links below for more information:

Quercus questions? Please contact Heather Buchansky

Week of August 27 - 31, 2018

Newly Renovated Reflection Room opens at Robarts Library

Looking for a quiet space to decompress?

The newly renovated Reflection Room on the 8th floor of Robarts Library is available to all students, staff and faculty for religious, spiritual and secular practices, including prayer, meditation, yoga, and mindfulness.

The room is equipped with yoga mats and props, meditation cushions and benches, books about yoga and mindfulness, and prayer mats. Noise-cancelling headphones and iPods loaded with guided mindfulness meditations are available for 2-hour loan at the Course Reserves desk on the 4th floor.

The room will be reserved for the mid-day Duhr prayer (12:30 – 1:30 pm) and afternoon Asr prayer (5:00 – 6:00 pm) Monday - Thursday. Weekly mindfulness sessions will be offered in the room on Tuesdays beginning in September. 

To find the room, take the P4 elevator to the 8th floor. 


Changes to the Onesearch homepage

A message from Lisa Gayhart, User Experience Librarian: 

The Web Team in Information Technology Services released a few updates to the Onesearch homepage on August 22. Our goal with the refreshed homepage is to make the user experience simpler and more action-orientedwith all changes based on stated user needs.

During the process, we focused on:

  •  updating high usage areas of the website, in order to impact the most users around critical website tasks
  •  making evidence-based changes and testing our assumptions with real users throughout the process
  •  determining changes through a mix of usage analytics, stated user needs, design best practices, and professional skill

Linked 3

Linked are our Guiding Principles for this refresh, as well as a summary of some of our research

Note: there are still some content and style edits pending. Please get in touch if you would like more information or to make comments at libux@library.utoronto.ca. 


OISE Library phone lines have migrated to VOIP

OISE Library phone lines have migrated to a VOIP system. If your department/library is not using the VOIP system, you will need to dial 9 plus the full 10-digit phone number to reach library staff.


Victoria University Library augments its William Blake Special Collection

The Victoria University Library has augmented its William Blake Special Collection with the purchase of:

The grave: a poem / by Robert Blair; illustrated by twelve etchings executed from original designs; to which is added a life of the author.

London: Printed by T. Bensley, Bolt Court, for the proprietor…1813.

The Victoria University Library copy, illustrated by twelve etchings executed by Louis Schiavonetti, from the original inventions of William Blake, 1808, is Copy 5 of 6 known hand-coloured copies. The Victoria University Library copy was purchased with contributions “In memory of Gerald Eades Bentley, Jr., Renowned Blake Scholar & Friend to the Library” whose donation of his William Blake collection in 2005 formed the nucleus of the current holdings.

Week of August 13 - 17, 2018

Dentistry Library renovation closure

We are excited to announce that the Dentistry Library will be undergoing a space renovation in the coming months. This is great news for our users, and is in alignment with our goal to provide a more modern and comfortable study space for our community to enjoy. Due to the renovation, the library will be closed from Monday, August 20 until approximately late October, 2018. Please visit the Dentistry Library website for collection access and service changes, and to check for any updates. If you have any questions, please contact us at library.dentistry@utoronto.ca.

Week of August 7 - 10, 2018

UTL communications survey and focus groups results coming soon 

Thank you to everyone who completed the UTL communications survey in February and who participated in the communications focus groups in April. We received a great deal of constructive feedback that will help us make both short and long-term adjustments to improve internal communications in our large library system. 

We anticipate receiving the final report from the Research Design & Analysis Office in September. The report will be shared broadly with everyone who works at UTL.

If you have any questions please contact Margaret Wall, Communications Librarian, at 416-978-1757 or margaret.wall@utoronto.ca


Countdown to Quercus: Training sessions and library content

A reminder that the University of Toronto will be moving to a new Learning Management Engine (LME) called Quercus (powered by Canvas) to replace Portal (powered by Blackboard) on September 1, 2018.

Quercus training sessions

(Note: training session info in this section pertains mainly to the St. George campus)

General Quercus training sessions will continue to be offered in August and September, either in-person or online. More info on dates and times can be found on the Quercus Training Schedule site and in the Upcoming Events section.

Can’t make it to any of the sessions? Learn more about Quercus on the Online Resources site, which includes a 12 minute intro video.

Other useful sites:

Quercus FAQ

Quercus Support Resources

Library content in Quercus

The ‘Fix-it’ tool that was used to customize the Library Resources feed in Portal will not be migrated over into Quercus. The new Library Resources feed in Quercus will consist of a course LibGuide (if there is one and the LibGuide creator chooses to have it embedded) or a default LibGuide that is not subject-specific. More information will be available on the Library Resources and course reserves feed in the coming weeks re: how it will look and the information it will contain.

There is now a ‘Librarian’ role in Quercus. Note that library staff can request additional roles (i.e. Designer or Teacher) if they are heavily embedded in the course. More information on roles and permissions are outlined in this chart.

To assist with the LME migration from Portal to Quercus, please also review all LibGudes and webpages you are in charge of and replace the word ‘Portal’ with ‘Quercus’ along with the new link (https://q.utoronto.ca/) by September 1.

Quercus questions? Please contact heather.buchansky@utoronto.ca 


Strategic Planning 2018 - 2023 Committee

Dear colleagues,

Last month, I announced a call for participants for the UTL Strategic Planning Steering Committee. This committee, to be co-chaired by Julie Hannaford and Neil Romanosky, will be advisory to me and will lead the development of a strategic plan for the central libraries for 2019-2023.

I am pleased to announce the following membership of the Steering Committee:

  • Houman Behzadi, Music Library/Collection Development Department
  • Alexandra Carter, Fisher Rare Book Library
  • May Chan, Metadata Processing
  • Ikee Gibson, Capital Projects and Planning
  • Amy Greenberg, Scholars Portal
  • Neelum Haq, Access & Information Services, Robarts
  • Erica Lenton, Gerstein
  • Steve Marks, ITS
  • Reg Matson, ITS
  • Andrew Nicholson (UTM)
  • Elizabeth O’Brien (UTSC)
  • Mark Phillips, Downsview
  • Mindy Thuna, Engineering & Computer Science
  • Jenaya Webb, OISE

I wish to thank the members of the Steering Committee for giving their time and perspectives to this process, and to everyone who put their name forward for consideration in response to this call. There will be ample opportunity for everyone at UTL to engage in the strategic planning process via working groups and other initiatives, so I would ask you all to consider sharing your thoughts in the development of this plan.

With best regards,

Larry P. Alford

Chief Librarian

University of Toronto Libraries

Week of July 23 - 27, 2018

Keep@Downsview Project receives 2017 OCUL Outstanding Contribution Award

The Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL) has recognized the Keep@Downsivew Project with a 2017 OCUL Outstanding Contribution Award.

Keep@Downsview is a partnership between five Ontario universities: University of Toronto, University of Ottawa, Western University, McMaster University and Queen’s University. The innovative approach of this initiative goes beyond shared basic storage of libraries legacy collections to a focus on their preservation. With 47 individuals (plus a host of entire departments) across five institutions actively involved in the project, OCUL recognizes that Keep@Downview is an excellent example of how collaboration can help ensure the preservation of the scholarly record for future generations.

Read last year's U of T News article to learn more about the project.

Read full U of T News article

For further details on the Keep@Downsview partnership visit their website

 

Week of July 16 - 20, 2018

East Asian Library Newsletter - July 2018

EAL newsletter cover page July 2018

The Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library has just released the latest issue of the EAL Newsletter.

Past issues of the newsletter are available on the EAL website.

In the current issue, you will find:

  • Highlights of Events and Exhibits (Winter/Spring 2018)
  • Notable Acquisitions
  • Library & Staff Updates

Print copies of the newsletter will also be made available at the East Asian Library’s reference desk. Please let us know your thoughts and send your feedback to Hana Kim.

Happy reading!


Indigenous Matters Committee - Call for Members

UTL is in the process of establishing a new committee, the Indigenous Matters Committee, which will meet to discuss and work on projects to improve services to Indigenous users and help UTL continue to build relationships with Indigenous communities. This committee will consist of fifty percent library representatives from all three campuses and fifty percent Indigenous community members.

The specific goals of the committee are as follows:

  1. To review the University of Toronto’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) Steering Committee Final Report and make recommendations regarding actions that can be taken to respond to the TRC to UTL via the Chief Librarian’s Executive Council.
  2. To collaborate with different units and committees, within UTL and at the University level, on projects and initiatives related to Indigenous matters, worldviews, research methodologies, etc.
  3. To share information within UTL regarding Indigenous initiatives both at the library and University level to promote wider awareness.
  4. To communicate and work in consultation with the University of Toronto Indigenous Community and Student Services (First Nations House, Elders Circle, Centre for Indigenous Studies, Centre for Aboriginal Initiatives, etc.).
  5. To work with libraries across UTL to improve services and programs for Indigenous users.
  6. To serve as a venue for Indigenous community feedback for UTL initiatives, services and programs
  7. To provide staff with learning opportunities regarding issues that pertain to Indigenous users.

We hope that you will consider stepping forward to serve on this important committee, which will be chaired by Desmond Wong, Outreach Librarian. This committee is currently seeking a librarian from the Sciences, a librarian from UTM and a library staff member from any UofT Library. Members are asked to serve for a two-year term.

If you wish to volunteer, please email Desmond Wong by Friday, August 3, 2018. Please include in the subject line of the email the following:  Indigenous Matters Committee.

Thank you,

The Indigenous Matters Committee


Congratulations to the Library of Conquest dragon boat team

For the fourth year running, UTL’s dragon boat team, the Library of Conquest, participated on July 1 in the Dominion Day Regatta Association Canada Day Regatta. The races took place on Toronto’s Centre Island.

After the practices in May and June, the team’s pace, rhythm and paddle skills progressed through excellent team work. On Canada day, the team moved from 4th place in the first race, to 3rd in the second one, and 1st runner up in the final. The team earned a silver medal!

UTL dragon boat team Toronto IslandsUTL dragon boat team with silver medals

Image 1: UTL Library of Conquest team photo before the races

Image 2: After the races, with the silver medal win!

[Photos by Stephen Hong]


OCUL Collaborative Futures to move forward with Ex Libris Alma and Primo

The Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL) is pleased to announce the selection of the Ex Libris Alma® library services platform and Ex Libris Primo® discovery and delivery solution, as the core platforms for its Collaborative Futures initiative. Thirteen of OCUL’s 21 member institutions are now participating in Collaborative Futures and, upon implementation, will use a consortial instance of Alma and Primo to meet the changing research needs of their students, faculty, and staff. The University of Windsor, an OCUL member already using these Ex Libris’ solutions, will also be joining the initiative.

Read the full OCUL report here.

Week of July 9 - 13, 2018

Report on library activities in support of TRC Calls to Action

Dear Colleagues,

I am pleased to forward the attached report on activities in the University of Toronto Central Library system to support the TRC Calls to Action in Wecheehetowin: Answering the Call. This excellent report was prepared by Desmond Wong and reflects the work of many across the libraries who have been committed to meeting the TRC Calls to Action. I want to thank Desmond for preparing this report, and I also want to thank Desmond and everyone in the libraries who have worked so hard on Indigenous library initiatives in support of the TRC Calls to Action.  

With best regards,

Larry P. Alford

Chief Librarian

University of Toronto Libraries


New Scholars Portal Books platform goes live

Scholars Portal is pleased to announce the full release of the Scholars Portal Books platform, now live. All users who accessed the legacy platform now have access to their complete holdings on the new site, including ACE collections and those available to users outside Ontario.

All previously bookmarked links will redirect to the new platform, and all previously administered ACE tokens will continue to function.

Highlights of the new platform include:

  • Smooth HTML page scrolling with a more consistent display across different types of books
  • Use of a fully harmonized metadata standard, BITS, which allows for significantly improved browsing and searching across facets
  • In-browser concurrent use monitoring, so that use of Adobe Digital Editions (ADE) is no longer required. Users will still have the option to use ADE if they’d like to keep a book beyond one reading session.

Additionally, we’ve launched the SP Admin Tool, where staff can view up-to-date title lists, entitlements, and usage statistics in the browser. We’ll be reaching out to e-resources staff at each school with account credentials in the coming weeks.

The Scholars Portal Books redevelopment is the result of a two year New Initiatives Fund grant  from the Ontario Council of University Libraries, representing all 21 Ontario universities. The platform has been re-written from the ground up in-house at Scholars Portal, with staff at many OCUL schools contributing at every step along the way. You can read more about the release timeline here.

Questions about the platform? Email books@scholarsportal.info


UTL welcomes visiting librarian from The University of West Indies

We are very pleased to welcome Mrs. Sharon Premchand-Mohammed, Systems Librarian at The University of the West Indies, to the University of Toronto Libraries. Sharon is in Toronto in July and August as part of her program to conduct research on models for library systems and electronic resources departments, including management structure, human resources, the library systems in use, and the existing challenges. She is being hosted by the Reference and Research Services department from July 9 to 13.

Left: Sharon Premchand-Mohammad and Chief Librarian Larry Alford (Photo by Jack Leong)


Phishing attempt targets UTL users

We have become aware of a phishing attempt targeting UTL users. The message suggests that the user's library account will be expiring due to inactivity. The Libraries will never send users an email with a link in it asking for personal information. If in doubt, please contact itshelp@library.utoronto.ca. 

Please share the following information with your users: 

The University of Toronto Libraries will never send you an email with a link in it asking for your personal information. If in doubt, please contact the library by chat, email, phone or in person: https://onesearch.library.utoronto.ca/ask.

Week of July 3 - 6, 2018

In the Loop Working Group established 

In response to feedback received through the recent UTL Communications Survey, an In the Loop Working Group has been established to review the content and organization of the Loop newsletter for UTL employees. The members are:

  • Margaret Wall (coordinator), Communications Librarian, Central Libraries 
  • Raquel Russel, Communications Assistant, UTSC Library
  • Stephen Crotty, Senior Serials Acquisition Specialist, Collection Development Department, Central Libraries
  • Francesca Kennedy, Graduate Student Library Assistant, Communications, Central Libraries
  • Elizabeth Meyers, Library Technician, Bibliographic, Victoria University
  • Nathan Wolfe, Reference & Research Support Specialist, UTM Library 
  • Tracy Zahradnik, Engineering Librarian, Engineering & Computer Science Library 

​Over the summer, members will participate in a comprehensive review of the content and organization of In the Loop and suggest adjustments to improve usability of the newsletter to better meet the information needs of readers.  

Thank you to everyone who volunteered to be part of this work.

If you have any questions or would like to submit feedback for consideration by the working group, please contact margaret.wall@utoronto.ca


Release of the Draft Tri-Agency RDM Policy for Consultation

--- on behalf of Dylanne Dearborn and the UTL RDM Committee ---

Canada’s three federal research granting agencies — the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) — have released a Draft Tri-Agency Research Data Management Policy for Consultation

The draft policy outlines proposed changes in three areas: institutional strategy, research data management plans, and data deposit.  The policy, once introduced, could have an impact on researchers and the institution.  In preparing to submit an institutional response for this consultation process, the Provost has put out a call for feedback (see below) from the U of T community.  There is representation from UTL on the working group that will be drafting the institutional response.  In addition to the institutional response, the Tri-agencies are also welcoming individual feedback on the draft policy (deadline Friday August 31, 2018).

You may wish to familiarize yourself with these communications, and be prepared to refer researchers to the draft policy and/or the call for feedback from the Provost as needed.

The Libraries have Research Data Management Librarians Laure Perrier and Dylanne Dearborn (.5 in the physical and applied sciences) as resources, as well staff in the Map and Data Library, and at both the UTSC and UTM campuses to support any questions about research data management.  A website is available, as is communal email rdm@utoronto.ca which is monitored by the Research Data Management Committee. Your questions are welcome, and you are welcome to refer any questions from students and faculty to these resources.

Call for Feedback – Tri-Agency Research Data Management Policy (PDAD&C #105)

The three federal research funding agencies—the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) (the agencies)—have developed a draft Tri-Agency Research Data Management Policy, which aims to support Canadian research excellence by fostering sound digital data management and data stewardship practices. The Policy follows the consultation and release in 2016 of the Tri-Agency Statement of Principles on Digital Data Management, for which institutions and individuals were also asked for input.

The draft Policy includes suggested requirements related to three primary areas:

  1. Institutional data management strategies;
  2. Researcher data management plans;
  3. Data deposit.

The agencies have also developed a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) resource, which includes information about data management, background on Tri-Agency Research Data Management Policy development, and guidance on complying with the proposed requirements.

The agencies have invited institutions, associations, organizations, and individuals to comment on the draft Policy and its usefulness in advancing data management practices in Canada. Feedback will inform the final design of the Policy, which the agencies plan to launch in 2019. Feedback can be submitted until Friday, August 31, 2018.

Given the importance of data management for the University of Toronto community, we will be submitting an institutional response to the call for feedback. We also encourage members of the University community to provide their own input directly to one of the email addresses below, and to share their submission with us at vpri.reports@utoronto.ca if possible. Broad input from as wide a range of disciplines as possible is important to reflect the unique aspects of data management in different areas of scholarship.

CIHR: ResearchData-Donneesderecherche@cihr-irsc.gc.ca
NSERC: ResearchData-Donneesderecherche@nserc-crsng.gc.ca
SSHRC: ResearchData-Donneesderecherche@sshrc-crsh.gc.ca


Central Libraries review rescheduled for November 29 & 30

Dear Colleagues,

As per my letter of April 5, 2018, the external review of the University of Toronto Central Libraries originally scheduled for April 9 and 10, 2018 was unfortunately cancelled due to last minute changes in the availability of members of the review team.

We are pleased to confirm that the review has now been rescheduled for November 29 and 30, 2018.

Please find the formal review announcement with the revised site visit dates [below].

Sincerely,
Sioban Nelson
Vice-Provost, Academic Programs

****************************************************

Dear Colleagues,

As part of our ongoing process of ensuring academic excellence at U of T, I have commissioned an external review of the University of Toronto Central Libraries for 2018. Reviews provide an unparalleled opportunity to secure the expert advice of leaders in the field, assess our performance against leading international institutions, and receive guidance on key strategic directions. The last external review of the University of Toronto Library was in 2008. The review report is taken forward to governance as a measure of its importance and made broadly available to stakeholders.

I am pleased to inform you that an external review team for the University of Toronto Central Libraries has been established and will be visiting the University of Toronto on November 29 and 30, 2018. Its members are Colleen Cook, Trenholme Dean of Libraries, McGill University; Virginia Steel, Norman and Armena Powell University Librarian, UCLA; and Sarah Thomas, Vice President for the Harvard Library, University Librarian and Roy E. Larsen Librarian for the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University.

Below, for your information, is a copy of the terms of reference for the review.

We will be working closely with the Chief Librarian’s Office to arrange the schedule for the review visit, including meetings with a broad range of constituencies that will provide the reviewers with the opportunity to hear a wide range of views.

Comments and suggestions from interested persons are welcomed. These may be submitted to Emma del Junco, Executive Assistant to the Vice-Provost, Academic Programs at emma.deljunco@utoronto.ca.

Sincerely,
Cheryl Regehr
Vice-President & Provost

 

University of Toronto Central Libraries External Review 2018: Terms of Reference

The Terms of Reference provide the framework of the review report. Reviewers are asked to comment explicitly upon the following with regard to the Central Libraries except where otherwise stated:

  1. The consistency of the Libraries’ strategic plan with the University’s long-range plan, in particular, the Libraries’ mission to foster the search for knowledge and understanding in the University and the wider community.
  2. Progress towards the Libraries’ strategic priorities, including the capacity to meet opportunities and challenges ahead successfully.
  3. The effectiveness of the Libraries’ efforts to build collections and services that support excellence and achievement in research across the disciplines.
  4. The effectiveness of the Libraries’ collections, spaces and services in supporting undergraduate and graduate education and overall student experience.
  5. The effectiveness of the Central Libraries’ internal organizational and financial structure including the appropriateness of decision-making and resource allocation with respect to budget, staff complement, and infrastructure, and including acquisition and investment in the Libraries to serve the University community.
  6. The effectiveness of relationships within the Central Libraries* and the other libraries that make up the UTL system.
  7. The scope and nature of the Libraries’ partnerships and leadership, locally, nationally, and internationally to support the Libraries’ and the University’s mission.
  8. Extent to which initiatives have been undertaken to enhance the accessibility and diversity of the Libraries in the areas of support for students and faculty, and librarian and staff complement.
  9. Overall assessment of the Libraries relative to the best in Canada and internationally, including areas of strengths and weaknesses.

 

Libraries and services within the scope of the UTL Central Libraries Review

Central UTL Libraries (as per strategic plan)

1. Architecture Landscape & Design Library (Shore + Moffat)

2. Bora Laskin Law Library

3. Business Information Centre (Rotman)

4. ChengYuTung East Asian Library

5. Engineering and Computer Science Library

6. Gerstein Science Information Centre

7. Harry R.Abbott Dentistry Library

8. John P. Robarts Library for the Humanities and Social Sciences

9. Map & Data Library

10. Mathematical Sciences Library

11. Media Commons

12. Music Library

13. Noranda Earth Sciences Library

14. Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) Library

15. Petro Jacyk Central & East European Resource Centre

16. Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library

17. Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library

18. University of Toronto Archives & Records Management

Central UTL Services

1. Access and Information Services

2. Bindery

3. Cataloguing and Metadata Services

4. Collection Development and Acquisitions

5. Facilities, Security, Health and Safety

6. Finance, Human Resources and Administration

7. Information Technology Services

8. Reference and Research Services

9. Scholars Portal (a partnership with Ontario Council of University Libraries, which

    provides information technology tools and support to all 21 Ontario universities)

10. Scotiabank Information Commons

11. UTL Advancement

12. UTL at Downsview

Week of June 25 - 29, 2018

Some library services unavailable on Canada Day long weekend, June 30 - July 1

As a reminder, U of T Facilities and Services will conduct a planned electrical shutdown of Robarts Library and the ITS data centre this Saturday June 30 beginning at 5 pm. This shutdown is scheduled to coincide with the Canada Day long weekend, and will last approximately 24 hours. Some staff and online library services will become unavailable during this time.

During the shutdown the following services will be unavailable:

  • Staff access to workstations managed by UTL ITS
  • Staff access to Sirsi WorkFlows from any location or device
  • Access to online library services, including the library catalogue, e-resource access, and other online library platforms

Users visiting a library website during the shutdown will be redirected to a page notifying them of the expected duration of the service disruption. All work is scheduled to begin and conclude outside of library operating hours.

For questions or concerns about this work and the services affected, please feel welcome to contact Information Technology Services at 416-978-7638, or itshelp@library.utoronto.ca.

Week of June 18 - 22, 2018

STAR Awards nomination period extended to June 22

The STAR Committee is extending the deadline for nominations until Friday, June 22. 

For further details, the nomination form, and other supporting documentation, visit our website at: http://library.utoronto.ca/star.

Please direct any questions you have to Daniela Ansovini (STAR Committee Chair), at: star.nominations@library.utoronto.ca.

We look forward to receiving your submissions.

The 2017-2018 STAR Committee

Week of June 11 - 15, 2018

TCard+ update

The transition to the online TCard+ service from the current payment system for printing and photocopying is now complete at the Robarts, Engineering & Computer Science, Earth Sciences and OISE libraries. The transition will also be completed this week at the Gerstein, Kelly and PIMs libraries.

The Cash to Card machines in these libraries have been removed. Users can now add funds (TBucks) to their TCards online at https://tcardplus.utoronto.ca/ or at a Guest Card & Cash Loading station at Robarts Library or the Gerstein Science Information Centre. 

The transition to TCard+ at the Inforum, Music, Law, Milt Harris, EJ Pratt, Emmanuel, and Graham libraries is upcoming pending technical work.

Balances remaining on TCards can be transferred to users’ TBucks accounts by library staff at the Reader Registration desk on the second floor of Robarts Library.

Please see the updated FAQ for full details on how the new system works. We will be updating the FAQ regularly. 

If you have an old departmental copy card, please return it to Peter Wilson, Associate Director, Finance, Library Administration: 416-978-7648, peter.wilson@utoronto.ca. The Business Office will credit the funds back to the library. 

Questions? Please contact Glen Morales, Library Operations, g.morales@utoronto.ca.


Nominations for the STAR Awards close this Friday, June 15

The deadline for STAR Award nominations is this Friday, June 15. These awards acknowledge the extraordinary work of University of Toronto Libraries staff by recognizing notable team accomplishments that directly align with the Library's Strategic Plan.             

The first award is for Ongoing Excellence and acknowledges a team's unwavering, consistently excellent, and collegial service, year after year. The second award is for Innovation and recognizes a team working on an outstanding new project, service or other innovation, whether small or large.

Please consider nominating your own or another team to bring attention to the exceptional work occurring across our great libraries. For further details, the nominations form, and other supporting documentation, visit our website at: http://library.utoronto.ca/star.

Please direct any questions you have to Daniela Ansovini (STAR Committee Chair), at: star.nominations@library.utoronto.ca.

We look forward to receiving your submissions.

The 2017-18 STAR Committee


Strategic planning 2018 - 2023: Call for participants

Dear colleagues,

Our current Central Libraries’ Strategic Plan: Charting our Future ends this year. It has been a wonderful, living document, which has guided the work of the UTL Central Libraries significantly over the last five years. It was created based on a collegial process with significant consultation and input from faculty, students and all of you. It is now time to develop a new plan. With that in mind, I have appointed Julie Hannaford and Neil Romanosky to co-chair a Strategic Planning Steering Committee which is advisory to me, in order to develop the strategic plan for 2019-2023.

The committee will be broadly representative of our staffing groups, as well as representative of the diversity of our work locations and years of service. The committee will begin its work over the summer to develop the process. You will recall that the recent Self-Study indicated that the External Review will inform our new plan. We anticipate that the Review will now occur in late November, and it will be an important part of the material considered by the committee.

I invite UTL Central Libraries staff to put their name forward to serve on this Steering Committee, which will draft the new plan. The committee will work over the summer and fall, with a deadline of delivering a new plan by the end of March, 2019. Should you wish to serve on this important committee, please send your name and confirmation of supervisory approval to Lesley Falkner by Friday, June 29. 

With best regards,

Larry

Larry P. Alford

Chief Librarian

University of Toronto Libraries​


Spring 2018 edition of Noteworthy now online!

In this issue

  • Taking Note
  • Welcoming Students with Families to Robarts Library
  • Refurbishment of Gerstein Instruction Lab Made Possible through Donor Support
  • Recognition of Excellence: Chief Librarian Larry Alford and Struggle and Story: Canada in Print Exhibition Catalogue Receive Awards
  • In Memoriam: Sonja Bata and Marvin Gerstein
  • A Full Fall Agenda at Fisher
  • Other Events
  • Happy Anniversary Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library!
  • Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library’s Fall/Winter Highlights
  • Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library Events
  • University of Toronto Libraries Celebrates Gift of Archives from Canadian Music Legend Anne Murray
  • University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services Acquires the Early Records of University College
  • The Elaine Ling Fonds
  • Shakespeare Brings Humor(s) to the Science Library
  • Building Confidence: Information Literacy Outreach at the University of Toronto Music Library
  • Exhibitions & Events

Doors Open 2018: The Printing Room at the John M. Kelly Library

The John M. Kelly Library was pleased to participate in this year’s Doors Open festival. Library staff offered tours of our printing studio, which proved very popular! As Martyn Wendell Jones writes on the St. Mike’s website, “Small tours … departed every half hour from 10:30 am onwards both days of the event; demonstrations of antique methods and devices (including the Jobber Press) proved so popular that guests began to sign up for Sunday tour slots on Saturday after Saturday’s remaining slots had filled to capacity.” If you, too, are interested in our letter-press printing studio, you can view our 2009 guide 'The Printing Room' or read about the history of the studio in 'All Hands-On: The History of St. Michael's College Press' by Manda Vrkljan and Noelle Gadon, which appeared in Devil's Artisan, no. 81 (Fall/Winter 2017). The Kelly Library will soon be hiring a College Printer, so watch for exciting updates on our Printing Studio in the coming months.

Click here to read more about St. Mike’s Doors Open tours.


News about the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies Library

The University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS) has informed us of its decision to close its Aerospace Library. 

Engineering and Computer Science Library staff will work with the department to assess the UTIAS print collections for transfer to Downsview, which is adjacent to the UTIAS offices. 

This work will begin this summer and likely conclude in December 2018.

There will be no change to the support for teaching, learning, and research that faculty and students of the department already receive through the Engineering and Computer Science Library.


Call for new Tri-Campus Steering Committee members - 
Connections and Conversations: An Affinity Group for Racialized Staff at U of T

 

Connections & Conversations, an affinity group for racialized staff at the University of Toronto founded in 2014, seeks to renew and expand its tri-campus steering committee. Made up of senior administrators at U of T, the steering committee sets strategy and direction for the tri-campus group, and provides guidance to the three campus chapters in their campus-specific activities. Members of the steering committee discuss human resources policies and practices in order to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion at U of T, including the development of proposals for new initiatives to recommend to the university’s senior executive team. The tri-campus steering committee also reviews information, data, and proposals received from the senior administration of the university, including material that is sometimes sensitive, embargoed, or confidential.

HOW
We propose that, going forward, prospective tri-campus steering committee members complete a formal application process. A call for applications will be made through chapter and tri-campus meetings, listservs, websites, social media (such as LinkedIn and Twitter) and newsletters. Applicants are asked to submit a statement outlining their interest in joining the committee, and highlighting any particular skills they feel would benefit the group. References may also be requested. Applicants will be evaluated by the current steering committee based on their involvement with the Connections & Conversations group or other university activities that support the group’s goals. Work outside of the university setting will also be considered – provided that such work is in line with advancing equity and diversity practices.

WHO
The three Connections & Conversations chapters each have their own unique culture, goals and activities. Over the 2018-19 year, a goal for the tri-campus steering committee is to solidify the leadership groups for the three chapters, and to formalize processes of consultation and collaboration between the chapters and the tri-campus steering committee. Chapter leadership positions will remain open to all staff – unionized and non-unionized. The established practice of selecting steering committee members from among the PM category will continue to be upheld in order to address confidential and sensitive matters with senior university leadership. Ideally candidates for the tri-campus steering committee will be at the level of PM4 and above with supervisory and management duties. Chapter leadership of the three campuses will be invited to join the tri-campus steering committee periodically for confidential discussion. Ideally, a minimum of two members per campus should be represented on the steering committee each year in order to allow for adequate tri-campus representation and succession planning. Preference will be given to racialized staff. Gender and ethnic diversity and other forms of intersectionality and representation will also be a priority when determining steering committee membership.

HOW LONG
Steering committee term lengths are three-years, renewable to a maximum of six years (i.e. two three-year terms). Membership will be staggered in order to allow for leadership continuity and renewal.

WHEN
Terms would coincide with the academic year and run from July to June. Recruitment would occur over the summer months in order to have new members in place for the start of the new academic year. Applications will be accepted in May/June of each year.

Applications for the 2018-2019 tri-campus steering committee are now being accepted. Please send statements of interest and questions to connectionsandconversations@utoronto.ca by Thursday, June 28, 2018.

Week of June 4 - 8, 2018

Newly renovated Reflection Room re-opens at Robarts Library

Robarts Library has recently renovated the 8th floor Reflection Room (formerly named the Multi Faith room), a space for religious, spiritual, and secular practices, including prayer, meditation, yoga, and mindfulness. Everyone in the University of Toronto community, including those who work here, are welcome to use the room. This revitalization was made possible by a Chief Librarian's Innovation Grant. An ablution room has also been opened on the 8th floor. We are committed to making the space as inclusive as possible. We would like to hear your thoughts related to possible programming activities, or use of the space during particular blocks of time through this online survey


TCard+ rolling out on the St. George campus this week

The transition to the online TCard+ service from the current payment system for printing and photocopying in central St. George campus libraries is rolling out on the St. George campus this week. 

Instead of adding funds to the chip on TCards through the Cash-to-Card machines at the Robarts and Gerstein libraries, users will be able to add funds (TBucks) to their TCards online at https://tcardplus.utoronto.ca/.

Balances remaining on TCards can be transferred to users’ TBucks accounts by library staff at the Reader Registration desk on the second floor of Robarts Library.

Please see the updated FAQ for full details on how the new system works.

Questions? Please contact Glen Morales, Library Operations, g.morales@utoronto.ca.

Week of May 28 - June 1, 2018

Call for nominations | Consultative Committee: Associate Chief Librarian for Special Collections and Director of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library

Loryl MacDonald has served ably as Interim Associate Chief Librarian for Special Collections and Director of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library following an unsuccessful search to fill the position. I am deeply grateful to her for stepping into this role. We are now ready to resume a search to fill the position permanently. The Rare Books and Special Collections Department, University Archives and Records Management Services, and Media Commons report to the position. The position is a “Senior Library Administrator” under the University of Toronto Policies for Librarians. In accordance with the Policies, we will strike a consultative committee to conduct a search and to advise and make recommendations on filling the position. I will chair the committee which will have a minimum membership as follows:

  • One member of the teaching staff
  • One Associate Librarian
  • One Library Department Head
  • Four librarians
  • Three individuals who are not librarians

I welcome nominations to serve on the committee including self-nominations. If you are interested in serving or wish to nominate a colleague, please send your nominations to Lesley Falkner (lesley.falkner@utoronto.ca). Please include the words “Associate Chief Librarian for Special Collections and Director of the Thomas Fisher Library Search Committee Nomination” in the subject line, and please specify the category of the nomination as listed above. We ask that you submit your nominations by June 8, 2018. Lesley will compile a list of the nominations for my review.

Thank you.

With best regards,

Larry P. Alford

Chief Librarian

University of Toronto Libraries


UTL Special Collections welcome 1,700 visitors to Doors Open

The Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library welcomed over 1,700 visitors to Doors Open on Saturday, May 26. This year, for the first time, all three UTL Special Collections departments - Media Commons, Rare Books and Special Collections, as well as the University Archives – participated in the event. In keeping with the Doors Open 2018 theme of “film”, on display in the Fisher were early editions of books adapted into film, screenplays, storyboards, as well as historic University of Toronto films. On the third floor of Robarts, the Media Commons hosted tours and a screening of highlights from their collections varying from a 1907 French silent film to a 1978 Miss Teen Canada television broadcast. Staff from all three departments were on hand to chat and answer any questions throughout the day.


Call for volunteers: In the Loop Working Group 

We are establishing a working group to review the content and organization of the Loop newsletter for UTL employees.

Members will participate in a comprehensive review of the content and organization of In the Loop and suggest adjustments to improve usability of the newsletter to better meet the information needs of readers. Work will take place this summer. 

Everyone who works in the library system at U of T is invited to step forward to serve on this working group or contribute feedback for consideration by the group. Membership will be broadly representative.

If you wish to volunteer, please email margaret.wall@utoronto.ca by Friday, June 8.


Ask Us service moves to the former TCard Office at Robarts Library

On Monday, May 28, the Ask Us mobile desk at Robarts Library moved to the area in front of the former TCard Office space on the 2nd floor of Robarts Library, where a backup service for longer interactions is co-located with Reader Registration.

Ask Us offers high quality, on the spot user support and library research assistance as part of a continuum of service for in-building users. Hours over the summer are 11 am - 5 pm, Monday to Friday and 1 - 5 pm on Saturdays. Users will also be able to reach us by phone at 416-978-6215 as usual. 

In addition to drop-in support, this new location features comfortable consultation space which will allow for one-on-one meetings with students and faculty in an easy to find location.


Scholars Portal services unavailable on Canada Day

Due to an upcoming planned power shutdown at the University of Toronto, ALL Scholars Portal services will be temporarily unavailable from Saturday, June 30 at 5 pm until Sunday, July 1 at 5 pm.

The OCUL website, SPOTdocs wiki, and Scholars Portal user guides will also be unavailable during this time.

Please contact help@scholarsportal.info with any questions.


Canada-Hong Kong Library team pulls together for a good cause

On May 27 Team Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library took part in the Orbis Plane Pull for Sight. Team members, captained by Jack Leong, combined their strength and succeeded in pulling a 65-ton 757 cargo plane for 20 feet in 15 seconds, raising $2,641. This is the fourth consecutive year in which the library participated in this meaningful event, raising over $9,700 for Orbis from 2015 to 2018. Orbis is an organization dedicated to training eye doctors and restoring vision worldwide.

We wish to thank everyone who came out for the plane pull, as well as those who supported us with donations. A special mention goes to the Hon. Dr. Vivienne Poy, whose substantial contributions have helped us raise more than the minimum donation of $2,000 every year. Thank you for supporting the library team!

Above: Team Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library, University of Toronto Libraries. May 27, 2018

Week of May 21 - 25, 2018

University of Toronto becomes newest member of HathiTrust

The University of Toronto has become the newest member of HathiTrust (www.hathitrust.org), a partnership of major academic and research libraries collaborating in an extraordinary digital library initiative to preserve and provide access to the published record in digital form.

HathiTrust serves a dual role. First, as a trusted repository it guarantees the long-term preservation of the materials it holds, providing the expert curation and consistent access long associated with research libraries. Second, as a service for members and the public good, HathiTrust offers persistent access to the digital collections. This includes viewing, downloading, and searching access to public domain volumes, and searching access to copyrighted works. Specialized features are also available which facilitate access by persons with print disabilities, and allow users to gather subsets of the digital library into “collections” that can be searched and browsed.

To download books and create collections, login to the HathiTrust site with your utorid and password.

For further support, visit the Libraries’ FAQS:


Some  library services unavailable on Canada Day long weekend, June 30 - July 1

On Saturday, June 30 beginning at 5:00 pm, Robarts Library and the ITS data centre will undergo a planned power shutdown. This shutdown is scheduled to coincide with the Canada Day long weekend, and will last approximately 24 hours. Some staff and online library services will become unavailable during this time.

During the shutdown we expect the following services to become unavailable:

  • Staff will not have access to workstations managed by UTL ITS.
  • Staff will not have access to Sirsi WorkFlows from any location or device.
  • Users will not have online access to review and renew their loans or pay fines.
  • Catalogue searches and off-campus access to e-resources may become unavailable for all users.

We will provide further details of anticipated service disruptions closer to the scheduled shutdown date, and post website notices for our online users. All work is scheduled to begin and conclude outside of library operating hours.

For questions or concerns about this work and the services affected, please feel welcome to contact Information Technology Services at 416-978-7638, or itshelp@library.utoronto.ca.


Changes to ITS managed library staff workstation updates

As part of ongoing efforts to ensure the security of our library staff computer network, Information Technology Services (ITS) will begin automatically rebooting ITS managed staff workstations on a weekly basis. Beginning June 2, all ITS managed staff workstations will reboot on Saturdays at 2:00 am.

Rebooting staff workstations on a weekly basis helps keep your system secure by applying regular system and security updates to your computer. Ensuring that files are closed also ensures regular backups of your data.

Please remember to save your work and log off every day and leave your computer powered on. If you are logged into your workstation at the time of the reboot, any unsaved work may be lost.

To log off your computer and leave it powered on go to:

  • Start menu (or press the Windows key on your keyboard)
  • Select 'Log off'

We will send a reminder email preceding the first weekly reboot on May 29 and the day before the first reboot on June 1. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact ITS at 416-978-5555, or itshelp@library.utoronto.ca.


To support U of T voter engagement, UTL publishes Top 10 List

1. Understand why voting is important 

Provincial governments are responsible for healthcare, education, hydro, and many social services.  They are also heavily involved in issues related to transportation, infrastructure, the environment, and the administration of justice.  If you care about any of these issues, you should vote! 

2. Make sure you're registered to vote 

Visit the Elections Ontario e-registration webpage to confirm, update, or add your name to the voters list. You are eligible to vote if you are: 

  • 18 years of age  or older on election day, and 
  • a Canadian citizen, and 
  • a resident of Ontario 
3. Mark June 7th on your calendar 

Ontario's provincial elections will take place on Thursday, June 7, 2018. Know the electoral district you are in and the location of the polling stations. Away from home on June 7th?  Check out Election Ontario's guide for students who won't be in their home district on Election Day. 

4. Know your party platforms 

For a quick way to see what party you're leaning towards,  CBC's Vote Compass can help you see how your views line up with the four major political parties in upcoming provincial election. To learn more about the parties' values and priorities, check out Maclean's party platform guide

5. Know your history 

As Shakespeare said, what's past is prologue.  What political parties stood for in the past is a good predictor of their future choices.  Check out the Libraries' guide to campaign materials from previous elections.  You'll learn some party history, and see some wacky stock photos! 

6. Stay informed 

Read about what Ontario parties stand for, and then keep reading!  While the NDP and Green Party have published a complete platform on their website, the Ontario Liberals and the Ontario PC are unveiling their policies gradually. 

7. Fact check what you hear 

Don't fall into the trap of misinformation or fake news.  The Libraries' RADAR guide is a handy cheat sheet that you can use to evaluate your information sources.  A good rule of thumb is to check out multiple news sources when exploring a topic.  (Protip: you can find most major Canadian newspapers on our Newspapers guide!) 

8. On Election Day, be a voting pro 

Make sure you know where to vote and what to bring with you.  Find your polling station with Elections Ontario's Voter Information Service.  They also have a guide to acceptable identification. You can't vote without ID and proof of address! 

9. Treat yo self after you vote   

Eat your favourite snacks.  Watch your favourite movie.  Play your favourite video or board game.  You deserve it after your hard work!  Media Commons has all your movievideo game, and board game needs covered. (We don't have snacks, but we recommend chocolate!) 

10. Still have questions? Check out Election's Ontario AI, Ask Owen!   

Owen is a fun chatbot that can answer your elections questions in English or in French, no searching required.  He's pretty clever, so it's worth checking him out even if you're a voting expert already! 

View all top 10 tips for Ontario Election voters here.

Week of May 14 - 18, 2018

Reporting computer problems to ITS

As a friendly reminder, ITS support staff rely on your reports to swiftly identify and resolve problems as they arise. The sooner we're able to address a problem, the more effectively we can contain it before the problem grows. Whenever you're facing a computer issue, like missing files or suspicious emails, please feel encouraged to give us a call and we'll do our best to support you as soon as possible.

416-978-5555 | itshelp@library.utoronto.ca


New Scholars Portal Books platform now live

Scholars Portal is pleased to announce the public beta release of the new Scholars Portal Books platform.

Highlights include:

  • Smooth HTML page scrolling with a more consistent display across different types of books
  • Use of a fully harmonized metadata standard, BITS, which allows for significantly improved browsing and searching across facets
  • In-browser concurrent use monitoring, so that use of Adobe Digital Editions (ADE) is no longer required. Users will still have the option to use ADE if they’d like to keep a book beyond one reading session.

Over 175,000 commercial titles, including all of our university press collections, are now available for reading and downloading, and we are adding new collections weekly. We expect to reach over 280,000 titles by mid-summer. Keep track of loading progress on our Books redevelopment wiki and as always, we welcome comments, questions, and concerns to books@scholarsportal.info.

This platform will become the default books platform in July 2018. All previously linked and bookmarked books will continue to be accessible at the same URL during the transition and long-term, but we encourage staff and end users to use the new platform as much as possible.

Read the full OCUL news release


Call for nominations: University of Toronto Libraries STAR Awards

Graphic which reads "Star Awards"
 
 
 
 
We are pleased to announce that nominations are now open for the 4th annual Staff Team Appreciation & Recognition (STAR) Awards. These awards acknowledge the extraordinary work of University of Toronto Libraries staff by recognizing notable team accomplishments that directly align with the Library's Strategic Plan.             
The first award is for Ongoing Excellence and acknowledges a team's unwavering, consistently excellent, and collegial service, year after year.              
The second award is for Innovation and recognizes a team working on an outstanding new project, service or other innovation, whether small or large.
Please consider nominating your own or another team to bring attention to the exceptional work occurring across our great libraries.
For further details, the nominations form, and other supporting documentation, visit our website at: http://library.utoronto.ca/star.
The deadline to apply is June 15, 2018. Please direct any questions you have to Daniela Ansovini (STAR Committee Chair), at: star.nominations@library.utoronto.ca.
We look forward to receiving your submissions.
The 2017- 18 STAR Committee

UTSC Chief Librarian Review Committee seeking feedback

Dear Colleagues,

We are writing in follow-up to our message of April 12, 2018 in which we announced the review committee to consider Victoria Owen, Chief Librarian at UTSC for reappointment. 

The UTSC Chief Librarian is a Senior Administrative Appointment in the libraries. The process for those appointments including a review is found at paragraphs 57, 59-61 and 64 of the Policies for Librarians. 

In order to support its work, the committee welcomes feedback as previously announced. If you have comments that you would like to make to the committee regarding the reappointment or the UTSC libraries, we would ask that you write to either of us (vpdean@utsc.utoronto.ca or larry.alford@utoronto.ca). Please put 'UTSC Chief Librarian Review - Confidential' in the subject line. While comments may not be made anonymously, we will compile your feedback and share it with the committee, in summary form, without names attached. If you prefer to talk to one of us rather than provide written comments, please let us know and we will try to schedule a conversation.  We ask that any comments be sent by June 1, 2018. Thank you.

With best regards,

Larry and Bill

 

 

William A. Gough

Vice-Principal Academic and Dean

University of Toronto Scarborough

 

Larry Alford electronic signature

Larry P. Alford

Chief Librarian

University of Toronto

Week of May 7 - 11, 2018

Reader Registration moves to second floor of Robarts Library

The Reader Registration service at Robarts Library has moved to the former TCard Office space on the 2nd floor of Robarts Library. 


Temporary suspension of acceptance of gifts-in-kind to the central collections

Beginning June 1, 2018 until at least January 2019, the University of Toronto central libraries will temporarily suspend acceptance of donated materials for the general collections. This will allow our collections specialists to assess and process the significant volume of donations previously received that have yet to be added to the collections. As well, it will allow for the establishment of harmonized policies and acceptance procedures across the central library system.

Please note that this measure will not apply to gifts of antiquarian books for the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, gifts to the University of Toronto Archives or gifts to the Media Commons. For information on gifts to these libraries, please contact:

  • Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library: P.J. Carefoote: pearce.carefoote@utoronto.ca
  • Media Commons: Brock Silversides: brock.silversides@utoronto.ca
  • University of Toronto Archives: Loryl MacDonald: loryl.macdonald@utoronto.ca

If you have any questions or concerns regarding our temporary suspension of gift acceptances, please contact Caitlin Tillman, Associate Chief Librarian for Collections and Materials Management, at caitlin.tillman@utoronto.ca.


Library Systems Report for 2018

Hot off the press! Are you interested in learning more about the current state of Library Services Platforms (LSP)? Take a look at Marshall Breeding's latest Library Systems Report for 2018, published in the American Libraries Magazine.

Here is an excerpt:

“Academic libraries are looking beyond efficiencies in collection management or improvements in library-provided discovery services. Instead, they are addressing broader education needs by inserting relevant resources into platforms that support the curriculum and enhance their institutions’ research activities. Public libraries seek technologies that improve engagement with their communities. These libraries value reliable and feature-rich automation systems, and they are especially drawn to those that help them deliver compelling digital services. Basic library resource management and discovery capabilities no longer differentiate competitors in this market of mature products. Library services platforms (LSPs) have been in use for more than half a decade and are a proven solution with products that continue to mature and evolve. The move from legacy products to an LSP may provide new efficiencies for internal library operations, but current models extend deeper into the academic enterprise.”


Transition to TCard+ on track for the St. George campus by the end of May

The transition to the online TCard+ service from the current payment system for printing and photocopying in central St. George campus libraries is on track for the end of May.

Once complete, instead of adding funds to the chip on TCards through the Cash-to-Card machines at the Robarts and Gerstein libraries, users will add funds (TBucks) to their TCards online at https://tcardplus.utoronto.ca/.

As we approach the transition, we are sharing an FAQ to assist with preparation. Please review the FAQ and get in touch with any questions. 

Questions? Please contact Glen Morales, Library Operations, g.morales@utoronto.ca


U of T launches the True Blue Recognition Platform

poster promoting the True Blue Recognition PlatformA message from Kelly Hannah-Moffat, Vice-President, Human Resources & Equity, University of Toronto 

Dear colleagues,

I'm pleased to announce the launch of the True Blue Recognition Platform, a new tool that will allow us to build upon our culture of appreciation at the University.

Our faculty and staff make a significant contribution to the University of Toronto’s ranking as Canada’s leading institution of learning and one of the world’s top research-intensive universities.

It is important that we recognize those contributions though an ongoing practice and not just through formal recognition programs. Our work is more successful, and our performance further elevated, when our efforts are appreciated and valued. Expressing gratitude for the work of our colleagues should be an essential part of fostering a healthy work environment.

Taking a moment to recognize our colleagues within our units and across divisions and campuses contributes to making the University of Toronto an excellent workplace. I invite members of the University community to acknowledge when colleagues’ efforts have made a difference, and to convey your appreciation using the True Blue Recognition Platform.  

To learn more, please visit the True Blue Recognition Platform or contact our HR & Equity Recognition Team at hrandequity@utoronto.ca.  

Log onto today to the True Blue Recognition Platform to celebrate a colleague’s contributions.

Send a thoughtful recognition by May 31 for a chance to win $50 in points!

Sincerely,

Kelly Hannah-Moffat
Vice-President, Human Resources & Equity

Week of May 14 - 18, 2018

Week of April 30 - May 1, 2018

Mourning the victims of last week's attack in Toronto 

A message from Chief Librarian Larry Alford: 

Dear Colleagues, 

I know that we all are deeply saddened and shocked by the horrifying attack which took place in our city on Monday. Our thoughts are with the survivors, and the family and friends of those who lost their lives.

The horror of this event is amplified by details we are now learning about possible motives underpinned by hate, and because it took place in a setting where people should feel safe, simply walking down the street. I know that many of us live, visit or travel through that neighbourhood daily and this incident leaves us all deeply unsettled.

I encourage any of you who need support coping with the aftermath of this event to access the services available through the University of Toronto. The University’s Health & Wellness Centre provides a list of resources for students. For employees, the HR & Equity department provides a list of resources.

To read the University of Toronto’s response to the incident, please visit: https://www.utoronto.ca/news/u-t-saddened-horrific-van-attack-president-meric-gertler.


We have subsequently been informed that a U of T student was sadly one of the victims of Monday's horrific attack. I wanted to express my shock and sadness about this news. I join the President in mourning the loss of one of our students. All of our thoughts are with the student's family and friends during such a tragic time.

I am forwarding this statement from President Meric Gertler, in which he says:

“We are deeply saddened that a member of our community has died as a result of this terrible incident. We mourn the loss of our student and want those affected to know that they have the support of the university. In addition to those who are directly affected, we know that many at U of T are hurting. We encourage those in need of assistance to seek help through the services available to them on campus, as well as in the wider community.”

“This attack has touched the lives of so many people, here and around the globe. We want them to know they are in our thoughts. I also want to thank all members of our U of T community who are working to support them. And I join so many other Torontonians in thanking the first-responders involved, for their outstanding professionalism and service.”

You can read the full statement at: https://www.utoronto.ca/news/u-t-mourns-loss-student.

Sincerely, 

Larry 

Larry P. Alford

Chief Librarian


UTSC Library Receives Grant from the Ontario Career Ready Fund

The UTSC Library and the UTSC Department of Management recently received $225,000 in funding from the Government of Ontario’s Career Ready Fund (Stream 2). The grant will go toward creating work-integrated learning experiences for students, especially through the activities in the UTSC Library Finance & Trading Lab, including competitions and applied research initiatives, as well as staffing. Thanks to Bill Chau, Library Technician, and Stephanie Perpick, Liaison Librarian, Department of Management, of the UTSC Library, and Christine Arsenault and Noel Copping from the UTSC Department of Management.


Learn about the new LME at Quercus Day

Quercus (powered by Canvas) has been selected as U of T’s new learning management engine (LME), to replace the Portal (powered by Blackboard) in September 2018. There are upcoming Quercus Days scheduled for UTM (May 7), UTSC (May 8), and St. George (May 11) campuses, that will include presentations and hands-on demos on the new LME. Registration is not required. Drop in between 10am – 3pm. Visit the Quercus Day page for details on room location and updated information on topics as it becomes available.

Also a reminder that CTSI is running ‘Quickstart Quercus’ training sessions this month for those who would like more of an overview of the new LME. The sessions have been designed for instructors, TAs and course administrators, and may be of interest to library staff who have TA or course builder roles within the Portal.

Visit CTSI’s Quercus Training webpage for dates, times and registration details. Details and registration links are also available on the Upcoming Events page. 

Week of April 23 - 27, 2018

The Acquisition of UTL's 15 millionth volume

On behalf of Larry P. Alford, Chief Librarian, UTL

I am delighted to announce that the Libraries have recently acquired a 1481 William Caxton edition of Cicero’s De amicitia (Of Friendship) and De senectute (Of Old Age), with Buonaccorso de Montemagne’s De nobilitate (Of Nobility), the first English translations of classical and humanist texts, and one of the oldest printed books in the English language. With the addition of this Caxton to our collections, the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library possesses Canada’s oldest printed volume in the English language from the first press established in England. To celebrate this remarkable book, we are designating it as the 15 millionth volume in the University of Toronto Libraries including print and electronic volumes.

The purchase of the Caxton was made possible by financial contributions from many donors. The acquisition was endorsed wholeheartedly by a number of University of Toronto academic leaders and faculty who recognized the scholarly value of bringing this rare volume to the University of Toronto and to Canada, and I am deeply grateful for their strong support.

I would like to acknowledge the tireless efforts of Loryl MacDonald, Interim Associate Chief Librarian for Special Collections; Pearce Carefoote, Interim Head of Rare Books and Special Collections; and Megan Campbell, Director of Advancement. As well, we benefited greatly from the advice and guidance of the members of the Friends of the Fisher Steering Committee, led by F. Michael Walsh.

On Monday, April 23, to mark UNESCO’s World Book Day the Caxton acquisition was featured in central University of Toronto communications and library communications, and promoted to external media. As noted above, we also celebrated its addition to the University of Toronto Libraries’ collections as our 15 millionth volume. 


Call for Members: Consultative Committee, Head of Reference and Research Services

Debbie Green's five year term as the Head of Reference & Research Services ends in August, 2018. As per the librarian policies, a Consultative Committee will be struck to review the renewal of Debbie’s term. As per Article 62, the membership should be made up as follows:

  • The Associate Librarian for that area
  • The Head of a related department
  • Two librarians, who shall, wherever possible, be from that department or area concerned
  • Two non-librarians selected from employees of that department or area

If you wish to serve on this committee, please email Lesley Falkner (lesley.falkner@utoronto.ca) indicating your interest by Monday, May 7.

Week of April 16-20, 2018

U of T Libraries Graduate Student Exhibition Competition launches

We are pleased to announce the launch of the inaugural Showcase Your Work: U of T Libraries Student Graduate Exhibition Competition (submission deadline: May 31, 2018).

Graduate students can enter for a chance to win one of three $1000 prizes, and a chance to express the ideas in their existing research project by turning them into an eye-catching display. Winning projects will be featured at the Robarts Library in a special student exhibit in January 2018.

It is open to graduate students from all disciplines. Please consider sending this announcement to your respective faculty and departmental contacts.

More information and an entry form for the competition are available at: http://go.utlib.ca/exhibprize

- The Graduate Exhibit Award Working Group (David Fernandez, Ksenya Kiebuzinski, Maureen Morin, Megan

 

 


UTSC Chief Librarian Review

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce a review committee to consider Victoria Owen, Chief Librarian at UTSC for reappointment. The committee members are:

  • Larry Alford, Chief Librarian, University of Toronto Libraries, St. George Campus (Co-chair)
  • William Gough, Vice-Principal Academic and Dean, University of Toronto Scarborough (Co-chair)
  • Christina Arayata, Vice-President Academics & University Affairs, Scarborough Campus Students’ Union
  • Mary-Grace Capobianco, Acquisitions & Reference Technician, University of Toronto Scarborough Library
  • Leslie Chan, Associate Professor, Scarborough Centre for Critical Development Studies, University of Toronto Scarborough
  • Chad Crichton, Liaison Librarian, University of Toronto Scarborough Library
  • Monique Flaccavento, Director, OISE Library, St. George Campus
  • Tanis Franco, Archivist, University of Toronto Scarborough Library
  • Sarah Guay, Liaison Librarian, University of Toronto Scarborough Library
  • Angela Hamilton, Acting Deputy Chief Librarian/Coordinator, Liaison Librarian, University of Toronto Scarborough Library
  • Julie Hannaford, Deputy Chief Librarian, University of Toronto Libraries, St. George Campus
  • Stephanie Perpick, UTSC Library Finance and Trading Lab, Liaison Librarian, University of Toronto Scarborough Library
  • Zoran Piljevic, Director, Information and Instructional Technology Services, University of Toronto Scarborough
  • Natalie Rothman, Associate Professor and Associate Chair, Historical and Cultural Studies, University of Toronto Scarborough
  • Adriana Sgro, Access Services Team Leader, University of Toronto Scarborough Library

The UTSC Chief Librarian is a Senior Administrative Appointment in the libraries. The process for those appointments including a review is found at paragraphs 57, 59-61 and 64 of the Policies for Librarians. 

The committee will be meeting in the coming weeks. In order to support that work, the committee welcomes feedback. If you have comments that you would like to make to the committee regarding the reappointment or the UTSC libraries, we would ask that you write to either of us (vpdean@utsc.utoronto.ca or larry.alford@utoronto.ca). Please put “UTSC Chief Librarian Review - Confidential” in the subject line. While comments may not be made anonymously, we will compile your feedback and share it with the committee, in summary form, without names attached. If you prefer to talk to one of us rather than provide written comments, please let us know and we will try to schedule a conversation. 

We will also send reminders about the consultation process as the work of the committee progresses.

With best regards,

William A. Gough

Vice-Principal Academic and Dean

University of Toronto Scarborough

Larry P. Alford

Chief Librarian

University of Toronto

Week of April 9 - 13, 2018

Survey: ebook challenges and public service staff

The Ebook Communications Working Group has been asked to solicit feedback from public service staff about the challenges faced when working with ebooks, and to develop supports to meet those challenges. We would appreciate if public service staff would complete a 2-minute survey to help the working group establish priorities. If you supervise student staff who have a public service function, kindly forward on the survey.

[take the survey]

The survey will close on Friday April 20. Many thanks for your participation. 

- Eva Jurczyk, Debbie Green, Graham Bradshaw, Mindy Thuna

  Ebook Communications Working Group


Central Libraries Review delay

The Review of the University of Toronto Central Libraries has been postponed due to last minute changes in the availability of members of the review team. The visit will be rescheduled as soon as new dates can be confirmed.


TCard+ coming to the St. George campus this summer

By Summer 2018, the online TCard+ service will replace the current payment system for printing and photocopying in central St. George campus libraries. Instead of adding funds to the chip on TCards through the Cash-to-Card machines at the Robarts and Gerstein libraries, users will add funds (TBucks) to their TCards online.

This transition stems from the need to improve the user experience, efficiencies and controls, and replace antiquated hardware and software.

With the new TCard+ system, users will be able to load funds online using any major credit card or Visa Debit and will have access to an online portal where they can check their balance and print account statements. Visitor Cards can be purchased by those with library cards who do not have a UTORid or visitors who do not have any card at all.

Benefits of this new system include significant improvements in reporting and tracking functionality, as well as greater convenience and security. If a TCard is lost or stolen the balance is protected from the time the card is reported missing.

Before the Transition

Balances remaining on TCards by the transition date can be transferred to users’ TBucks accounts by library staff. However, to streamline the transition we are encouraging users to use up the funds on their TCards before this time. If you work directly with library users, please encourage them to use up their remaining funds and limit the addition of new funds to their card.

Questions? Please contact Glen Morales, Library Operations, g.morales@utoronto.ca

Week of April 2 - 6, 2018

UTL Self-Study

We are pleased to share with you the final version of UTL’s Central Libraries Self-Study, which has now been approved. We greatly appreciate everyone’s input into this document, which provides such substantive, rich information for the three external reviewers.

[download the file from Confluence]


Quickstart Quercus Training Sessions

Quercus (Canvas) has been selected as U of T’s new learning management engine (LME), to replace the Portal (Blackboard) in September 2018. ‘Quickstart Quercus’ two-hour hands-on training sessions will be held in April and May for those who would like an overview of the new LME. The sessions have been designed for instructors, TAs and course administrators, and may be of interest to library staff who have TA or course builder roles within the Portal.

Visit CTSI’s Quercus Training webpage for dates, times and registration details. Details and registration links are also available on the Upcoming Events page. 


Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library celebrates its 10th anniversary

March 6, 2018 marked a full decade since the opening of the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library (CHKL). The CHKL staff gathered in March to celebrate this milestone.

The seminar room was abuzz with conversation and laughter as staff members reminisced with colleagues. A slideshow playing in the background highlighted the numerous events hosted by the library throughout the years.

Over the past decade the Canada-Hong Kong library has expanded in many areas - from collections to events. It is known to be the largest collection of material related to Hong Kong outside of the city itself, with scholars visiting often to peruse the collections.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos by: Jay Seo

Left to right: Wendy Li, Kiki Chan, Annie Chan, Helen Tang, Jack Leong, Sarah Wilkinson, Fiona Fok, Annie Fan, Desmond Chan

Week of March 19 - 23, 2018

Inclusion, Diversity and Equity Committee

We had a wonderful response to the call for members to the central Libraries' Inclusion, Diversity and Equity Committee. The committee members for its inaugural term will be:

  1. Bilal Khalid                        
  2. Jordan Hale                                                     
  3. Sandy Sun                                                          
  4. Andy Ling                                                         
  5. Adriana Balen                                                
  6. Monique Flaccavento     
  7. Marina Fedchenko                                       
  8. Leslie Barnes                                   
  9. Liz Ridolfo
  10. Jesse Carliner

Thank you to everyone who expressed interest; we wish we could have accommodated everyone. It was terrific to see the broad enthusiasm to participate. This committee will report to us and we look forward to getting it started!

Week of March 12 - 16, 2018

New Family Study Space in Robarts Library 

On Thursday March 15, the University of Toronto Libraries will open Canada's first academic library family study space on the 9th floor of Robarts Library (Room 9-002). The space is for current students, faculty members, visiting scholars, and staff at the University of Toronto who have children 12 years old or under. The Family Study Space has a capacity of up to 20 adults and children, and includes workstations, collaborative space, a children’s play area with furniture and toys, a large screen TV/monitor, and nearby access to washrooms with comfortable nursing and baby changing facilities. Information on usage policies and registration can be found here: https://onesearch.library.utoronto.ca/family-study-space-robarts Forty registration forms have already been submitted for use of the room. 

The idea for the space came from feedback in the 2016 LibQUAL survey. A user requested that the Libraries create a family friendly study space, which is common in European university libraries. In the most recently available Canadian Graduate and Professional Student Survey (CGPSS), almost 50% of graduate students at the University of Toronto report family obligations as an obstacle to their success. By establishing the Family Study Space in the Libraries, we hope to reduce some of the obstacles for our community members with children to accessing physical collections, spaces, and in-person services.  

The Family Study Space has been funded by a Chief Librarian’s Innovation Grant. Team members included Francesca Dobbin, Director of the Family Care Office, Ikee Gibson, Operations and Building Services Officer, Kyla Everall, User Services Librarian, and Jesse Carliner, Communications and User Services Librarian. The space was designed and renovated by Adriana Balen, Manager, Capital Projects and Planning, and Julian Mitchell, Project Coordinator, in the Capital Projects and Planning Office. Signage for the space was designed by Graphic Designer Maureen Morin. Access to the Family Study Space is being managed by the Access and Information Department’s Carrel Office. Policy and registration procedures were developed in collaboration with Lari Langford, Head of Access and Information. 

If you have questions about the space, please contact Kyla Everall or Jesse Carliner. If you have any children’s books that you would like to donate to the Family Study Space, please email Kyla Everall.


Announcement of UTL External Review

Dear Colleagues,

As part of our ongoing process of ensuring academic excellence at U of T, I have commissioned an external review of the University of Toronto Central Libraries for 2017-18. Reviews provide an unparalleled opportunity to secure the expert advice of leaders in the field, assess our performance against leading international institutions, and receive guidance on key strategic directions. The last external review of the University of Toronto Library was in 2008. The review report is taken forward to governance as a measure of its importance and made broadly available to stakeholders.

I am pleased to inform you that an external review team for the University of Toronto Central Libraries has been established and will be visiting the University of Toronto on April 9 and 10, 2018. Its members are Colleen Cook, Trenholme Dean of Libraries, McGill University; Virginia Steel, Norman and Armena Powell University Librarian, UCLA; and Sarah Thomas, Vice President for the Harvard Library, University Librarian and Roy E. Larsen Librarian for the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University.

We will be working closely with the Chief Librarian’s Office to arrange the schedule for the review visit, including meetings with a broad range of constituencies that will provide the reviewers with the opportunity to hear a wide range of views.

Comments and suggestions from interested persons are welcomed. These may be submitted to Emma del Junco, Executive Assistant to the Vice-Provost, Academic Programs at emma.deljunco@utoronto.ca.

Sincerely,
Cheryl Regehr
Vice-President & Provost

Week of March 5-9, 2018

UTL communications survey - thank you for participating! 

Thank you to everyone who completed the UTL Communications Survey, which ran from February 6-27. We received a great deal of constructive feedback that will help us make both short and long-term adjustments to improve internal communications at UTL. 

Our next step will be to host follow-up focus groups in the month of April, to be facilitated by Olesya Falenchuk of the Research Design & Analysis Office at OISE. Further details will be shared shortly. 

At the conclusion of this important work, a report will be developed summarizing the feedback we have heard. We will share it out broadly with everyone who works at UTL.

Week of February 20 - 23, 2018

UTL communications survey open until February 27

Everyone who works at UTL, including in the central, federated, college and departmental libraries on the St. George campus, the Downsview campus, the UTM library and the UTSC library, is invited to participate in a UTL survey intended to get your perspective on the effectiveness of internal communication within the University of Toronto Libraries system.

If you haven't had a chance to participate yet and would like to, you can do so at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/XSJYHWZ.

Your feedback will help us identify strengths, gaps and areas for improvement.

If you have any questions or difficulty accessing the survey, please contact Margaret Wall, Communications Librarian, at 416-978-1757 or margaret.wall@utoronto.ca


New artwork in the UTM Library

UTM new artworkTo commemorate the 50th anniversary of the University of Toronto Mississauga (once called Erindale College), the UTM Library commissioned a sculpture by world-renowned artist, Guy Laramée. The piece was made possible through the UTM 50th Anniversary Legacy Fund, which was “established to support initiatives that showcase UTM’s legacy for future generations, contribute to the vibrancy of the UTM campus and celebrate its history and future.”

Laramée, a Montreal-based artist, creates exquisite landscapes and architecture out of books, ranging from single books to multi-volume collections. The UTM Library’s piece was sculpted out of a 12-volume Oxford English Dictionary set and was inspired by "some of the landscapes of the 'Chapada dos Veadeiros’, a highland tropical savanna with numerous peaks and canyons, near the town of Alto Paraiso, in the state of Goiás, Brazil” (Laramée, 2017). Interim Chief Librarian Shelley Hawrychuk explained that procuring “a piece of art which represents the campus, and what we are and do in libraries, would be perfect. We wanted to have something in our library that would last well beyond us." 

[Read more about this new addition]


Call for members: 'Library of Conquest' dragon boat team 

Now in its fourth year, UTL’s 'Library of Conquest' dragon boat team is calling for members!

This year the team will be practicing at Ashbridge’s Bay from 7 to 8 pm on Fridays, beginning on May 11. The team will race at the Canada Day Regatta on July 1, on Toronto’s Centre Island.

The team is happy to have coach Ann Forbes Arndt to help with training and Christina Santolin as its co-captain. There will be a monthly video review (new this year!) so you can see yourself from the side while paddling. More information about the practice site and the race are available on the team website. 

Week of February 12 - 16, 2018

UTL communications survey

Everyone who works at UTL, including in the central, federated and departmental libraries on the St. George campus, the Downsview campus, the UTM library and the UTSC library, is invited to participate in a UTL survey intended to get your perspective on the effectiveness of internal communication within the University of Toronto Libraries system.

Your participation in this survey is voluntary and all of your responses will be anonymous. The results will be tabulated by the Research Design and Analysis office at OISE and provided to Library Administration. The results will be shared in aggregate form with the UTL community.

We would really appreciate your participation. Your feedback will help us identify strengths, gaps and areas for improvement.

The survey will take approximately 15 minutes to complete. To participate, please click on the following link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/XSJYHWZ

If you have any questions or difficulty accessing the survey, please contact Margaret Wall, Communications Librarian, at 416-978-1757 or margaret.wall@utoronto.ca

The survey will remain open until Tuesday, February 27. Thank you in advance for providing this important feedback.


Fisher digital collections have a new look 

The University of Toronto Libraries' Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library and Information Technology Services (ITS) department are pleased to announce the re-launch of four digital collections, including the UNESCO Memory of the World registered Discovery and Early Development of Insulin, 1920-1925 collection. All four collections are excellent tools for research, and highlight some of the areas of strength in the Fisher collections.

Each of these four founding digital collections has been refreshed on our standards-based Islandora platform, and many items within each collection are now IIIF (International Image Interoperability Framework) enabled. This exciting emerging standard (http://iiif.io/about/) makes these important and unique research resources more readily available for image-based research and enquiry to scholars worldwide.

We invite you to browse the sites and offer any feedback that you might have.

  • Discovery and Early Development of Insulin, 1920-1925
    • This site documents the initial period of the discovery and development of insulin, 1920-1925, here at the University of Toronto. It presents over 7,000 page images reproducing original documents ranging from laboratory notebooks and charts, correspondence, writings and published papers, to photographs, awards, clippings, scrapbooks, printed ephemera and artifacts.
    • The History of the Discovery and Early Development of Insulin collection at the Fisher Library was recognized as having international significance, and inscribed into the UNESCO Memory of the World Register in 2013.
  • Anatomia 1522-1867: Anatomical Plates from the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library
    • This collection features approximately 4,500 full page plates and other significant illustrations of human anatomy. Each illustration has been fully indexed using medical subject headings (MeSH), and techniques of illustration, artists, and engravers have been identified whenever possible. There are 95 individual titles represented, ranging in date from 1522 to 1867.
  • The Barren Lands: J.B. Tyrrell's Expeditions for the Geological Survey of Canada, 1892-1894
    • This site documents two exploratory surveys of the Barren Lands region west of Hudson Bay, in northern Manitoba and Saskatchewan and the area now known as Nunavut. Drawing on materials from the J.B. Tyrrell, James Tyrrell and related collections at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto, it includes over 5,000 images from original field notebooks, correspondence, photographs, maps and published reports.
  • Wenceslaus Hollar Digital Collection
    • This digital collection features over 2,500 of the prints of Wenceslaus Hollar (1607-1677), a great master of the art of etching. The lion’s share of Hollar’s work was produced in and about his adopted England, but his artistic interest was broad ranging and the site also includes religious and historical prints, maps, portraits, costumes, and natural history. 

Image above: Arteries of the face. Plate 218 in Manuel d'anatomie descriptive du corps humain, représentée en planches lithographiées. Cloquet, Jules (1790-1883). Paris: Chez Béchet jeune, 1825. ID: anatomia:RBAI070 


Staff Team Appreciation and Recognition Committee

Posted on behalf of Julie Hannaford, Deputy Chief Librarian 

In 2014, Chief Librarian Larry Alford established the “Staff Team Appreciation and Recognition (STAR) Awards”. These awards recognize the outstanding work of library staff and align with our strategic goals of:

  • Cultivating a positive, transparent and responsive organization able to deliver excellent services that communicate the value of the library and its many outstanding employees;
  • fostering a culture of innovation and experimentation, and encouraging staff to adopt an evidence-based practice;
  • embracing a diversity of ideas, languages and skills that will enhance our ability to deliver excellent services;  and
  • promoting continuous professional growth and learning at all staff levels.

It is now time to establish a new committee who will put out a call for nominations for the 2018-19 awards and select new winners in the ‘Innovation’ and ‘Ongoing Excellence’ categories.

I hope that you will consider nominating yourself or a colleague to serve on this important committee. Membership will be broadly representative, and members are asked to serve for a one year term.

If you wish to volunteer, please email Lesley Falkner (lesley.falkner@utoronto.ca) by Friday, February 23. Please include in the subject line of the email the following: Staff Team Appreciation and Recognition Committee. 

Week of February 5 - 9, 2018

Student editors exchange ideas and best practices at 3rd annual Student Journal Forum

woman presenting

Contributed by the Student Journal Forum Planning Committee: Heather Buchansky, Student Engagement Librarian; Mariya Maistrovskaya, Institutional Repositories Librarian; Graeme Slaght, Copyright Outreach Librarian 

On January 24, the University of Toronto Libraries hosted the 3rd Annual Student Journal Forum. Approximately 30 current and aspiring student journal editors attended the half-day event, which included a panel of undergraduate and graduate student editors who spoke about best practices and provided concrete examples of challenges faced in producing their student publication. Mariya Maistrovskaya and Graeme Slaght also presented on the support and services available through the library for student publishing, including journal hosting through JPS (Journal Production Services) and answering copyright queries. During lunch, students were encouraged to showcase their journals, and share challenges and ideas from their own editorial experiences.

Feedback received from those who attended the event was overwhelmingly positive. "The best two people holding books as part of panelpractices session was informative and offered some very practical suggestions on a broad variety of topics.” The U of T Medical Journal editors emailed to say, “we were blown away by the quality and engagement of the speakers and the audience, your meticulous organization of the event, and your graciousness as hosts.”

Panel presentations are openly available in the TSpace repository as part of the collection of Student Journal Forum materials from previous years.

Special thanks to Daisy Dowdall, Faculty & Student Engagement TALint student, and Richard Hydal, Web Design Associate, for their assistance making the event run so smoothly.

Week of January 22 - 26, 2018

Chief Librarian’s Innovation Grants 2018-19

Dear Colleagues,

I am very pleased to launch the Chief Librarian’s Innovation Grants program for 2018-19. This initiative provides one-time-only (OTO) funding to implement unique projects that have the potential to be transformative for UTL and the communities we serve. Projects must have a UTL Central Libraries project leader; but participation from staff from the faculty libraries, the libraries at UTM and UTSC, and the Federated Libraries is welcome, as are partnerships with faculty, University staff, and/or students. Chief Librarian’s Innovation Grants are a challenge to test new ideas, while also fostering a culture of exploration, innovation and collaboration.

This is the third year of the program, and many wonderful projects and partnerships have been launched through Chief Librarian’s Innovation Grants. I encourage you to submit bold and creative projects. There are no limits to the types of proposals that may be approved. Projects must, however, have clear objectives, be innovative in nature, and cannot be dependent on continuing funding.

To submit a proposal, please send a document (2 pages max) that explains:

  1.       The nature of the project, and how it will benefit the targeted community
  2.       A workplan and accompanying timeline
  3.       A budget (Continuing staff positions cannot be hired with these funds. The funds may, however, be used to hire temporary staff.)
  4.       A list of team members
  5.       The name of the UTL Central Libraries project leader

Chief Librarian’s Innovation Grants funds must be spent between May 1, 2018 – April 30, 2019, and projects must be completed during that time.

Submissions will be accepted until March 22, 2018 at 5:00 pm. Please send your submissions to Laura Anderson (l.anderson@utoronto.ca) who will compile the applications. I will personally review and approve the grants, and I look forward to reading about your ideas.

With best regards,

Larry P. Alford
Chief Librarian


'Quercus' to replace Portal as U of T’s new Learning Management Engine

A new Learning Management Engine (LME) has been selected, and is now being piloted among select courses before its wider rollout for September 2018. Quercus, which is powered by Canvas, was selected as the winning name through a student contest and will be replacing Portal (powered by Blackboard) in the fall.

You can learn more about the new LME (and where the name Quercus comes from!) in this short video (2 minutes).

A team of library staff are participating in various advisory groups for the new academic toolbox, which will be looking at how library resources and services will be affected during this transition phase and will keep us up to date with any changes. In the meantime, here are some links with more information about the overall progress and transition to the new LME:

FAQs: http://toolboxrenewal.utoronto.ca/faq/

Updates: http://toolboxrenewal.utoronto.ca/category/updates/


Discover Archives

We are pleased to announce the official launch of the University of Toronto’s Discover Archives, available at https://discoverarchives.library.utoronto.ca.

Discover Archives is a shared portal for exploring archival holdings at the University of Toronto and its federated colleges. Visit the site today to search and browse descriptions of archival material related to the University of Toronto’s history, as well as records from
private individuals, families, businesses and organizations. The site includes a broad range of archival descriptions. You can browse finding aids and search across the many archival descriptions that provide access to the documentary heritage of the University of Toronto and its community. The site includes a Search Tips page to assist in navigating and searching online. You can also contact the participating archives repositories to schedule a research visit.

Week of January 15 - 19, 2018

Accessible Content ePortal Behind the Scenes Video Released

Scholars Portal is pleased to share our new video, ‘Accessible Content ePortal Behind the Scenes’. This video was produced by Scholars Portal in collaboration with the University of Toronto Libraries and is now available for wide distribution: https://youtu.be/QsURuUpnqTc.

This video shows how Accessible Content ePortal (ACE) service support staff convert library print materials into accessible formats. The video follows the progression of a digitization request from the initial meeting with an accessibility coordinator to the moment the library user is able to read the book using their preferred technology.

More about this service

The Accessible Content E-Portal (ACE) supports users with print disabilities at participating Ontario universities and colleges by making library collections accessible through an online platform. ACE contains a variety of library books which have been digitized and made available in accessible formats. Eligible users can also request books to be digitized and added to the collection on demand through our on-demand digitization service. A centralized and standardized production centre is provided by our digitization partner Internet Archive Canada, allowing participating schools to access high-quality digitized materials in five accessible formats.

For more information about ACE, please visit: http://guides.scholarsportal.info/ace/portal.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact ace@scholarsportal.info.


PJRC Update

In the latest PJRC (Petro Jacyk Resource Centre) Update, Graduate Student Library Assistant (GSLA) Natallia Barykina provides an overview of the exhibition she organized on the 'Russian Revolution in Contemporary Opinion' for Robarts Library. Wasyl Sydorenko discusses his friendship with Nicolae Pavliuc, Professor Emeritus of the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, and how this led to his ongoing research and technical support for the scholar's work on Ukrainian dialects in Romania. GSLA Maria Sokulsky-Dolnycky describes a collection of original drawings by Leonid Denysenko that shed light on camp life of Ukrainian Displaced Persons following the Second World War. Ksenya Kiebuzinski details the work involved in finding homes for 'orphaned' documents that fall outside the Library's collection profile. The issue closes with updates on Professor Peter J. Potichnyj's latest donations on insurgency and counter-insurgency movements in Ukraine (1944-1954).

Read the latest issue of the Centre's newsletter: https://tinyurl.com/yd7pkbah.

Week of January 8 - 12, 2018

Reappointment of Larry Alford as Chief Librarian, University of Toronto Libraries

A message from Cheryl Regehr, Vice-President & Provost

I am delighted to announce that the Agenda Committee of the Academic Board has approved the reappointment of Larry Alford as the Chief Librarian, University of Toronto Libraries for a five-year term, beginning July 1, 2018 and ending June 30, 2023.

Larry is currently serving as the Chief Librarian of the University of Toronto Libraries (UTL). Since joining UTL, he has demonstrated a keen awareness of the changing nature of libraries, and has championed the growth of new services for students, communications, and collaboration across the three campuses. Under Larry’s leadership, the UTL has been transformed into a globally recognized leader for research, education, and student services. Construction has also begun on the Robarts Common, a 1200-seat expansion of the John P. Robarts Library, which will play a key role in accommodating the ever-growing need for library resources and quality learning spaces on the downtown campus. Larry has an impressive history of working to promote and grow our Canadian collections, and has ensured that their contributions are recognized internationally.

Prior to his appointment as Chief Librarian, Larry was the Dean of University Libraries at Temple University where he was responsible for a library system that includes the five libraries of the Paley library system, the Ginsburg Health Sciences Library, and the Podiatric Medicine Library.

Larry Alford obtained his B.A. and M.L.S. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and received the Distinguished Alumnus Award from the University of North Carolina School of Information and Library Science in May 2005.

Larry’s exceptional leadership, insight, and administration has positioned UTL for continued success over the next five years. Please join me in congratulating him on this appointment.

Week of December 18 - 22, 2017

UTL at Downsview celebrates shelving the 3 millionth book

This past Thursday, members of the UTL Collection Development Department along with staff from the Archives, Fisher Library, and the Access and Information Department visited UTL at Downsview to celebrate the shelving of the 3 millionth book. Head of Access and Information, Lari Langford, and Downsview staff hosted the event. A celebratory cake was served along with a tour of the facilities, allowing staff the opportunity to see firsthand the collections and operations at Downsview. Staff signed the tray that the 3 millionth book is shelved on, so it will also function as a time capsule commemorating the event. The 3 millionth book was Orationes Academicae by Christian Thomasius, a law treatise published in 1723 and donated in 1891 by the University of Heidelberg Library to replace the collections destroyed in the 1890 fire at University College. It was considered a perfect choice to celebrate our 125th anniversary. Before beingPlacing the 3millionth item at Downsview transferred to Downsview, it was held at Robarts Library. To see the digitized copy visit the Internet Archive

The event proved to be popular on library social media channels and was also picked up by central U of T social media. For a roundup of Twitter activity, including a video of the shelving, you can view the Twitter Moment on the U of T Libraries Twitter account.

 

 


Typewriters for Typewriter Tuesdays at the OISE Library

typewriter with open book behind it

 

Do you have a manual typewriter that is collecting dust at home or in your library?

 

The OISE Library would love to dust off your old typewriter for events like Typewriter Tuesdays. If you’re interested in donating your manual typewriter, please contact Navroop Gill.
 

Thank you!
 

 

Week of December 11 - 15, 2017

Health Science Information Consortium of Toronto

Contributed by Lori Anne Oja, Executive Director, Health Science Information Consortium of Toronto (HSICT) 

The Health Science Information Consortium of Toronto (HSICT) held its 27th Annual General Meeting on December 1. A non-profit organization sponsored by the University of Toronto Libraries, HSICT fosters collaboration between UTL and health libraries across the GTA. Following are some highlights from the meeting, which took place at the University of Toronto Faculty Club. 

  • The Keynote Speaker was Dr. Brian Hodges, a professor in the Faculty of Medicine and the Faculty of Education at the University of Toronto, and Executive-Vice President, Education at the University Health Network. Dr. Hodges delivered an incredibly interesting and thought-provoking presentation titled 'The future of health professions education: What will we need humans for?'
  • HSICT Executive Director, Lori Anne Oja, presented the Consortium’s newly developed 2020 Strategic Plan and discussed where the Consortium is headed in the future. 
  • Marlene van Ballegooie, Metadata Technologies Manager, provided an update on the Library Services Platform project and where UTL is in the decision making process. 
  • The 2017 Joan Leishman Award winner was Sandy Iverson, Manager, Health Information and Knowledge Mobilization at St. Michael’s Hospital, nominated for her many contributions to the Consortium and to the health science information profession overall. 
  • The 2017 Sandra Langlands Innovation Award winner was the library at Cancer Care Ontario (CCO), which was nominated by CCO Chief Research Officer, Nicole Mittmann, for its continuous efforts to innovate service and support the goals of CCO. 
  • We were joined by Larry Alford, Chief Librarian, UTL, who attended the Keynote speech and reiterated the importance of the work the Consortium does. 

HSICT would like to thank all who participated in and contributed to this event!


Food for Fines 2017

Food bank boxesThanks to the support of the UTL community, it was another successful year for Food for Fines! Across the downtown campus, 428 items were collected by the Law, Robarts, Music, OISE and Gerstein libraries, while UTM collected 921 items and UTSC collected 74 items. This totals 1,423 items collected and $2,433 fines waived!

 

All items were donated to the U of T Food and Clothing Bank.

 

Thank you to everyone for your support!

 

Week of November 20 - 24, 2017

New Hire's Tea

Last Tuesday, staff gathered at the New Hire’s Tea to welcome all new members of the University of Toronto Libraries community.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you to all who attended- we are glad to have you as part of the UTL team!

Week of November 13 - 17, 2017

UTL and UTSC Chief Librarians discuss copyright with MPs Judy Sgro and Gary Anandasangaree

UTL Chief Librarian Larry Alford and UTSC Chief Librarian Victoria Owen met with Members of Parliament Judy Sgro and Gary Anandasangaree in Ottawa last week to discuss the upcoming review of the 2012 Copyright Act.

Week of November 6 - 10, 2017

Light therapy lamps now available at Robarts Library

Light therapy lamps are now available at the following locations in Robarts Library: 

  • 2nd floor reading room (centre 4-seater table against the back wall)
  • 3rd floor Media Commons reading room (enter through main doors, turn right toward the Theatre, first table on the left) 
  • 4th floor reference room (adjacent to shelf #25)
  • 10th floor (adjacent to shelf #30)

The lamps are available for use in the library, on a first-come, first-served basis.

Light therapy lamps are one mode of treatment for Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), also known as the “winter blues.” The lamps are designed to mimic spring and summer light levels. They are used by reading, working or relaxing in front of them for 20-30 minutes per day.

Information sheets are posted next to each lamp, with instructions for use, information about contraindications and links to resources for students, staff, faculty and members of the public who may be feeling distressed:

This initiative was made possible by a Chief Librarian’s Innovation Grant. The implementation team would like to thank Chief Librarian, Larry Alford for his support of this project. We are also grateful to Northern Light Technologies for the educational discount provided and Robin Mazumder, founder of the #lightbrary project for his support.

We are gathering feedback from users of the lamps at http://go.utlib.ca/lightsurvey.

Questions? Please contact a member of the implementation team:

Collaborative agreement signed between Library and Archives Canada and the University of Toronto

The University of Toronto has signed a collaborative agreement with Library and Archives Canada (LAC) to share the expertise and knowledge of the two institutions.

Under this agreement, which lasts until 2022, LAC and the University of Toronto will work closely to support university progress, research methods and technological developments while promoting Canada’s documentary heritage.

The two institutions will benefit from collaboration in several areas, including rare books, special collections, research data, copyright and fair use of works. Ways of collaborating will include workshops, training programs, internships and exhibits, to benefit professionals at LAC and professors, students, librarians and archivists at the University of Toronto. Some areas of common interest that will be explored include exhibitions of documents or material from 18th century British General James Wolfe and items from the collection related to Commander Louis-Joseph de Montcalm-Gozon.

UNESCO designates Fisher Library's McLuhan Library as a Memory of the World Collection

A message from Chief Librarian Larry Alford: 

I am delighted to announce that UNESCO has designated the Marshall McLuhan Archives held at the Library and Archives of Canada and the McLuhan Library held at the University of Toronto’s Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library as a Memory of the World Collection. This is one of six Memory of the World Collections in Canada. One of the others is the Discovery of Insulin Collection at the Fisher. Fisher is the only library in Canada with two Memory of the World collections. I want to thank John Shoesmith and Anne Dondertman for their hard work on the application in partnership with staff at LAC. I also want to say how wonderful it has been to partner with Dr. Guy Berthiaume and his staff at the Library and Archives of Canada to prepare the application to register this extraordinary collection. Professor McLuhan's legacy will be preserved in the Fisher and the Library and Archives of Canada for generations to come.
 
Below is an announcement with more information on both the archive and the library.
 
https://www.utoronto.ca/news/famed-u-t-professor-marshall-mcluhan-s-library-given-united-nations-heritage-designation
 
Please join me in congratulating our colleagues at Fisher for this extraordinary achievement.

With best regards,


Larry P. Alford
Chief Librarian
University of Toronto Libraries

Week of October 30 - November 3, 2017

2017 STAR Award Winners


The third annual Staff Team Appreciation and Recognition (STAR) Awards reception was held last week. Thank you to everyone who came out to celebrate the work of our fantastic colleagues! This year, we received 8 nominations: 6 for the Innovation Category and 2 for the Ongoing Excellence Category. The nominations were outstanding and the committee had a very difficult job in selecting the finalists. Thank you to all the nominees and nominators!

This years’ winners are the Electronic Data Interchange Project: GOBI Purchase Ordering & Invoicing Team (Innovation Award category) and Shipping and Receiving (Ongoing Excellence category). Pictures have been posted to the STAR website.

Electronic Data Interchange Project: GOBI Purchase Ordering & Invoicing Team

From left to right: Glen Morales, Michila Liyanage, Wenran Zhang, Don McLeod, Larry Alford, Sangami Jeyachandran, Alexa Evans. Not pictured: Deborah Silverman, Peter Wilson, Sian Meikle, Alastair Boyd, Caitlin Tillman.

Shipping and Receiving
 
From left to right:  Phillip Sousa, Raj Ramcharan, Dustin McMurphy, Morgan Gwynne-Vaughan, Patrick Grace, Larry Alford.


Provost's Instructional Technology Innovation Fund

Do you have an interesting and innovative idea for incorporating technology into your teaching but just need a little help getting it off the ground?

For more than 15 years, the Provost’s Instructional Technology Innovation Fund has been providing seed funding and support for innovative teaching ideas.

The fund features three streams – up to $2,000 without a matching requirement, up to $5,000 with a matching requirement, or a support stream, where you can get dedicated access to a professional staff member to help you bring your project to life.

For all the details, including access to the online application form, please visit http://itif.utoronto.ca

This year’s deadline to apply is November 10.

Week of October 23 - 27, 2017

New Learning Management Engine Selected

The University has selected Canvas as the new Learning Management Engine.  

Full details are available at: https://memos.provost.utoronto.ca/update-new-learning-management-engine-pdadc-24/ 

The expected implementation timelines are as follows:

October 2017 – December 2017: Technical configuration; quality assurance testing; very early adopters
January 2018 – August 2018: First cohort of courses live in the new ecosystem; continued quality assurance testing
September 2018: All courses in the new environment; decommissioned Portal

To follow along as the process unfolds, please bookmark the project website and check back regularly.

Week of October 16 - 20, 2017

Canadian Library Workers Day – October 20, 2017 

Dear UTL colleagues,

I am delighted that October 20th has been proclaimed Canadian Library Workers Day by the Canadian Federation of Library Associations. In celebration, I would like to extend my sincere appreciation to the entire University of Toronto Libraries team for your excellent work this past year, and over the years. Indeed, many of you have contributed decades of service.

The celebration of our 125th anniversary last week provided an occasion to reflect on our evolution since the beginning of the modern library system in 1892, which was run by a handful of staff. Today we are a large, interdisciplinary team. When we include our student employees, we total approximately 900 staff members across our forty-four library, tri-campus system.

All of you are vital to the success of the Libraries in our mission to support research, teaching and learning at the University. Your expertise and dedication are the very reason for our international reputation for excellence in collections, services and scholarship.

Your many daily contributions include:

  • maintaining a safe and productive environment in our buildings
  • managing the flow of supplies, library materials and correspondence in and out of the system
  • facilitating the circulation and organization of the collections
  • planning and executing crucial renovations and capital projects
  • making our services and collections accessible and discoverable to everyone in the university community and to researchers around the world
  • developing and acquiring our extraordinary collections and facilitating access to them
  • preserving for future generations our print and digital collections
  • providing individualized support to students and faculty
  • engaging in scholarship and teaching
  • supporting faculty and student scholarship
  • providing copyright advice
  • using technology to make the collections discoverable in new ways and to facilitate new forms of research
  • providing safe, secure space for students 24 hours a day
  • maintaining the technical infrastructure required for our daily work
  • performing the many and varied tasks essential to daily operations
  • building support from friends of the library which allows us to renovate and build new spaces for students
  • creating a supportive and inclusive environment for our patrons and colleagues
  • and much more... 

All of this work, both that which is behind-the-scenes and that which is more visible, is essential. I hope that you see your contributions reflected above. I am deeply appreciative of your work and your commitment to collegiality, innovation and leadership, as well as to the students and faculty at the University of Toronto.

It is fitting that next Thursday we will be celebrating the achievements of our colleagues from the past year at our STAR Awards reception. I would be delighted for you to join me at the event. As well, the UTL People section of In the Loop provides a weekly forum in which to recognize the many achievements and activities of our colleagues. It would be wonderful for everyone to be represented in that space - your submissions are very welcome.

With best regards,

Larry P. Alford

Chief Librarian

University of Toronto Libraries 


Three generations of chief librarians toast U of T Libraries' 125th anniversary

Robert BlackburnBy Geoffrey Vendeville, U of T News - reprinted with permission 

Much has changed since Robert Blackburn took the helm of the University of Toronto Libraries.

After service in the Royal Canadian Air Force and a stint at the Calgary Public Library, he became the university’s chief librarian in 1954. One of Blackburn's signature achievements of his almost three decades in charge was overseeing the construction of Robarts Library, which opened in 1973.

Now 98 years old, he returned to Robarts sporting a bookshelf tie to celebrate U of T Libraries' 125thanniversary. The building looks so different now, he said, that he can hardly find his way around anymore.

“It still feels like home, however,” he added.

He was joined by his successor Carole Moore, current chief librarian Larry Alford and Vice-President and Provost Cheryl Regehr. In speeches at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, they reflected on the library’s past and noted that another important era in the institution’s history has just begun: the construction of the Robarts Common expansion, which will add 1,200 study spots by the fall of 2019.

Katherine Morrison, an alumna and lead donor with her late husband Russell, helped Moore (below left) and Alford cut a chocolate cake with a picture of the Robarts expansion.

Carole Moore, Katherine Morrison and Larry AlfordRegehr, who often meets with other provosts from across the continent, said U of T’s library system is the “envy” of other universities. The 44-library network, including libraries at U of T Scarborough and U of T Mississauga, is consistently ranked the best in Canada and among the top 10 in North America.

The library system owes much of its success to the vision of university leaders of the 1960s such as Blackburn and former university president Claude Bissell, Moore said.

They anticipated collection growth needs and built a library system able to support research on the same level as Harvard and Oxford Universities.

But no one could have predicted a later surge in university enrolment or the impact of the information age, she said. In her 25 years as chief librarian, Moore led a renovation of Robarts, making more space for students by moving books to the library’s massive book vault at Downsview.

Most of Robarts’s 14 floors underwent a makeover. The government documents and map room on the fifth floor became a state-of-the-art geographical information centre. Second- and third-floor reading rooms were upgraded with new furniture and lighting.

An exhibition on the first floor of Robarts tells the story of U of T Libraries, from the opening of King’s College in 1843. The modern library system dates back to 1892, after a new library was built following a fire that devastated University College, which housed the library at the time.

The next chapter in the library’s history will be written with Alford at the helm. Although libraries have changed dramatically since he became a librarian in 1978, their mission remains to support research and scholarship, he said. Their role has expanded to storing digital information so that research data can be put to new use.

U of T Libraries stores 1.5 petabytes of information (a petabyte equals a million gigabytes). One faculty member in economics has used that information to analyze micro-economic events in the 1920s, Alford said, with the goal of predicting larger economic trends in the 1930s.

“Libraries are about preserving and storing information. I think research data is the next frontier,” he said.

- photos by Geoffrey Vendeville 

Week of September 25-29, 2017

Help us celebrate UTL's 125th Birthday Party!

All UTL staff are invited to attend a celebration on October 12 in honour of donors to the Robarts Common and in recognition of our librarians and staff for their many years of dedication upon the 125th anniversary of the University of Toronto Libraries.


Our past and present Chief Librarians will be there to reminisce about the UTL system and its evolution over the years. We would like to incorporate your memories as well. Do you have fond recollections of your time with the Libraries? If you would like to share them, let us know by end of day October 5 at communications.assistant@utoronto.ca, so we can include them in a slide show at the event. Please format submissions (send as many as you like) as either photos with 2-3 sentence captions, or 4-5 sentences of text (if no photo), so we can fit them onto the slides. Entries may be lightly edited for length.

Week of September 18-22, 2017

 

Chief Librarian's Innovation Grant Recipients

The Chief Librarian’s Innovation Grant program challenges staff to test new ideas while also fostering a culture of exploration, innovation and collaboration across the Libraries. Congratulations to the following UTL colleagues for their successful grant applications:

  1. Touchscreens for the Fisher Library's Exhibition Area: John Shoesmith, Liz Ridolfo, David Fernandez, Linda Joy, John Toyonaga, Gordon Belray
  2. Database for the Indigenous Perspectives Collection at the Bora Laskin Law Library: John Bolan and Sooin Kim with colleagues in the Faculty of Law
  3. Library Staff Professional Development on Indigenous Issues and Truth and Reconciliation: Desmond Wong, Elaine Goettler, Jennifer Toews, Sara McDowell, Whitney Kemble          
  4. Website to empower self-representing litigants: Sooin Kim and John Bolan         
  5. Bringing Indigenous Languages to Life at Robarts Library: Sara McDowell, Desmond Wong and Jennifer Toews with colleagues from the Centre for Indigenous Studies and First Nations House
  6. The Toronto Film Map: Rachel Beattie, Jordan Hale, Brock Silversides     
  7. Supporting Student Wellness at Robarts Library - Light Therapy Lamps: Margaret Wall, Heather Buchansky, Ikee Gibson, Susan Gropp, Katheleen Scheaffer, Christina Tooulias-Santolin       
  8. Supporting Student Wellness at Robarts Library - Mindfulness Meditation Resources: Margaret Wall, Heather Buchansky, Ikee Gibson, Susan Gropp, Katheleen Scheaffer, Christina Tooulias-Santolin               
  9. Exploring how the library can support DH experiential learning using IIIF technologies: Rachel Di Cresce, Dickson Law with colleagues from Digital Humanities and Medieval Studies, the JHI, and the Art Museum
  10. Engaging First-Year Imaginations - Information Literacy and the Escape Room: Ben Walsh and Michelle Spence with colleagues from the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering
  11. Benchmarking Science and Engineering Collections in the Age of E-Resources: Cris Sewerin                         
  12. Robarts Artwork Proposal: Julian Mitchell, Oday Khaghani​

 

3Rs of Research: Review, Report, Reproduce

Contributed by Heather Cunningham

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above: Patricia Ayala, Research Services Librarian, Gerstein Science Information Centre; Matthew Page, Research Fellow, Monash University; and David Bailey Professor of Physics, U of T

The 3Rs of Research: Review, Report, Reproduce, held on September 14 at the Gerstein Science Information Centre, brought together a diverse international panel of speakers to discuss their research and points of view from the library, biomedicine and physics. Many headlines in editorials, articles and newspapers decry problems and issues of reproducibility of published studies across the sciences, making this a timely topic for discussion. The fact that this event sold out within 72 hours is a strong indication of the interest among the U of T community.

Patricia Ayala, Research Services Librarian at the Gerstein Science Information Centre, discussed how the library has a central role in addressing many issues of the research lifecycle. Librarians have roles as collaborators, consultants and coaches on knowledge syntheses teams which can improve clarity of reporting and lead to increased transparency and reduced research waste. Matthew Page, a Research Fellow from the School of Public Health and Preventative Medicine at Monash University, Australia, with editorial roles for PLoS Medicine, Systematic Reviews, and the Cochrane Handbook, discussed research on improving the value of published biomedical studies. Ways to improve transparency and reproducibility include online tools to help authors include sufficient detail at the writing stage, web tools to assist journal editors in automatically checking submitted manuscripts for full reporting, and online data repositories, such as Open Science Framework, through which authors can share data to improve analyses, re-analyses and error-checking, and increase collaboration. David Bailey, Professor of Physics at the University of Toronto, discussed his research on uncertainty across the sciences and biomedicine. His research aims to help decision-makers better understand the implications of scientific research, where uncertainties will always exist. 

The full audience, composed of graduate students and faculty from medicine, engineering and other disciplines, were engaged with the topic and speakers as evidenced by comments such as “Excellent talk. I found all three speakers to be very well spoken, engaging and well-versed in their field. As a graduate student, I believe that the quality of research conducted should always trump the quantity.”


Week of September 4 - 8, 2017

UTL renews partnerships to support Chinese Studies researchers 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In late August, Chief Librarian Larry Alford, Director of the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library Hana Kim, and China Studies Librarian Stephen Qiao represented the University of Toronto Libraries on a visit to Beijing, China. While there, they attended the Beijing International Book Fair, the second largest book fair in the world,  where Larry delivered a talk entitled “Publishers and Libraries: The Scholarly Ecosystem in Balance” in which he advocated for greater cooperation between libraries and publishers to support researchers now and in the future. In addition to the book fair, Larry met with the Director of the National Library of China.

The delegation also met with library leaders and administrators of the Peking University Library to celebrate the continued partnership between the two libraries to support research, teaching and learning and international cooperation between the two universities. This meeting formalized the agreement and the plans that were discussed in March in Toronto when the Libraries hosted delegates from the Peking University Library, as well as many other university library leaders and publishers from China during the 4th Sino-American Academic Library Forum for Development and Cooperation. Together the two libraries intend to work on projects that focus on resources, digitization and utilization of the library, exchange of publications, and exchange of library staff. These projects will greatly facilitate research and accessibility of materials for scholars in China, Canada and beyond. The two libraries are also keen to support each other in the development and delivery of training programs that will enhance the knowledge and skills of staff to meet the needs of the 21st century global library, particularly in materials processing, preservation and research. The U of T Libraries will also host staff from the Peking University Library as part of an exchange program.


Canada by Treaty: Negotiating Histories exhibit opens at Robarts Library

Contributed by Desmond Wong

Throughout the month of September, Robarts Library is hosting the exhibit Canada by Treaty: Negotiating Histories in the portico area in front of the revolving doors of the Fisher Library. The exhibit was curated by Department of History faculty members Heidi Bohaker and Laurie Bertram, and Nehiyawak (Cree) architecture student James Bird, with assistance from library staff, including Sara McDowell, Desmond Wong and Marcel Fortin. The exhibit draws on content created by students in Bohaker’s joint 4th year undergraduate /graduate seminar Canada by Treaty: Alliances, Title Transfers and Land Claims. This exhibit is a timely reminder that Canada is a nation built on Indigenous lands and operates under a diverse network of treaties. This is especially relevant in 2017, as it is both the 150th Anniversary of Confederation and the 140th Anniversary of the Indian Act. I would encourage all library staff to take the opportunity to visit the exhibit and learn about the various treaties that involve Toronto, Ontario and Canada. Through the exhibit, you can also learn more about the negotiation of treaties and what it means to be treaty partners and treaty people.

[further information about the exhibit] | [view a Twitter video about the exhibit]

Please feel free to contact any of the library staff involved if you have any questions regarding the subject matter of the exhibit.

Week of August 21 - 25, 2017

President Gertler's Statement on Acts of Violence and Hate in Charlottesville, Virginia

A message from Chief Librarian, Larry Alford

Dear Library Colleagues,

I am forwarding to you President Gertler’s statement today on the recent horrendous acts of violence and hate in Virginia. I join him in extending my deepest sympathies to those directly and indirectly affected by these horrible acts. Such behavior is unacceptable and cannot be tolerated in a civil and civilized society.

As President Gertler says, bigotry, hate, intolerance and violence have no place on our campus, or anywhere else. I believe we must all speak out against these horrendous acts. 

President Gertler’s statement can be found at this link: http://www.president.utoronto.ca/presidents-statement-on-acts-of-violence-and-hate-in-charlottesville-virginia                

With best regards,

Larry

Week of August 7 - 11, 2017

Innis College Library renovation update

The Innis College Library renovation is going well (please drop by to see the new paint that is up already). We have some unexpected but happy additions to the renovation process that will mean the library will look fantastic when completed, but will delay the re-opening date.

All boxes of library books will be moved from the 2nd floor lounge into the library on August 28 and Kate Johnson, the College Librarian, will be furiously shelving books with the hope to open the library on September 5, after the Labour Day weekend.                                                    

Questions? Contact Kate Johnson, College Librarian | katej.johnson@utoronto.ca

Week of July 31 - August 4, 2017

Head of the University of Alberta's Coutts Education and Physical Education Library visits UTL

Jack Leong, Desmond Wong, Katherine Koch and Monique Flaccavento at the OISE Library

UTL welcomed Katherine Koch, Head of the University of Alberta's Coutts Education and Physical Education Library, for a visit on July 28. Her visit, which was part of her research project on library services for international students, included tours of the Robarts and OISE libraries, as well as a meeting with Jack Leong, Monique Flaccavento and Desmond Wong to discuss international outreach, library collections and services for international students and indigenous communities, and recent developments in education libraries. Katherine's research report will be released in December 2017.

Week of July 24 - 28, 2017

UTL Staff Appreciation BBQ 2017

On July 13 UTL staff congregated in the Innis College Courtyard for the 16th annual Library Staff Appreciation Barbecue. Although the weather was cool that day, even the rain couldn't dampen the smiles on people's faces as they shared a meal and a laugh with their colleagues, listened to remarks from Chief Librarian Larry Alford, and hoped to hear their names called in a raffle!

Photos by Stephen Hong, Text by Lindsay Harker


2017 EAL Newsletter now available

The Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library is pleased to announce the release of issue 2017-1 of The EAL Newsletter, now available both in print and online. Print copies are available for pick-up at the reference desk of the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library. 

This semi-annual newsletter is edited and published by the East Asian Library to communicate new developments in EAL services, events and activities with the U of T community, library friends and beyond.

Some highlights from the current issue:

  • 2017 AAS/CEAL Conference and the Fourth Sino-American Academic Library Forum for Cooperation and Development held in Toronto

  • Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library’s Spring event highlights

  • Faculty interviews: Q&A with Professor Yiching Wu

We hope you enjoy the newsletter! Your comments and ideas are most welcome – please email them to lucy.gan@utoronto.ca.

The Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library Team

Week of July 17 - 21, 2017

Finding Myself in the Archive

(A postcard decorated by Olive Plowman, including two gold buffalo pins and glitter cursive which reads: “Olive C. P. July 13, 1910”. Source: The Plowman Family Postcard Collection, Special Collections, John M. Kelly Library, University of St. Michaels College.)

"Finding Myself in the Archive" was developed in partnership with the Master of Museum Studies (MMSt) at the Faculty of Information, University of Toronto and six University of Toronto libraries and archives.

Fifty-four graduate students enrolled in “Exhibitions, Interpretation and Communication” (a course developed by Prof. Irina D. Mihalache) were paired with objects at each of the archives and libraries.

They were asked to write reflections on these objects, all of which had some connection with themes of migration, movement and travel, to research their history, and try to link them to the present.

View the exhibition here.

Week of July 10 - 14, 2017

UTL Dragon Boat Team 2017

Contributed by Jack Leong

For the third year running, UTL’s dragon boat team, the Library of Conquest, participated on July 1st in the DDRA Canada Day Regatta. The races took place in the Welland International Flatwater Centre.

After just two months of weekly practices, and with many crew members new to the sport, the crew was very happy with how they had come together as a team in their races.  It has been a great and fun practicing experience sharing the boat over the last two months, and the team would like to thank you their family and friends for their support! Special thanks go to Ann Forbes Arndt and Tim MacFarlane for their superb coaching and coordination.

Week of June 26 - 30, 2017

Robarts Common Update

 

 

 

 

A message from Chief Librarian, Larry Alford:

Dear colleagues,

I am delighted to let you know that a contract has been awarded to Harbridge + Cross Limited, for the construction of the Robarts Common, which was designed by Diamond Schmitt Architects. Work will begin almost immediately. Site preparation started on Monday, June 27. We hope to open the building in time for the 2019 fall term.

Made possible by generous support from Drs. Russell and Katherine Morrison and in partnership with the University, the new five-floor building will include 1,200 seats in both large reading rooms with a variety of seating including tables, carrels, bench seating, terraced seating and soft seating, and group study rooms of various sizes and configurations. It will be connected to floors 2-5 of Robarts Library on the Huron Street side but designed to operate independently during 24/7 extended hours. The Robarts Common will be built over the existing loading dock with access to the loading dock and adjacent spaces maintained.

Among the first things you will notice in the coming weeks will be crews on the site erecting fencing and hoarding, and building tree protection barriers. Some trees will need to be removed first to accommodate construction. However, landscaping at the end of the project will include the planting of three trees for every one removed. Noisy work during the entirety of the project will be from 7:00 am to 7:00 pm, with most work happening between 7:00 am to 3:30 pm.

Many people have been involved in getting the project to this step, and I want to thank everyone involved, but especially my predecessor, Carole Moore. This project is the final step in completing her vision to restore, revitalize and expand Robarts Library as a centre for research and learning. I also want to thank Alfred Cheng who devoted enormous energy to moving the Robarts Common project forward. I want to thank Megan Campbell who has been tireless in her efforts to seek private funds for the project. Again, many others have worked on this project and will continue to work on it, and I thank them all.

Regular updates will be provided via e-mail and In the Loop as the project progresses.

With best regards,

Larry


Fisher Library Condensation Control Project: Update

The installation of new precast concrete panels on the outside of the Fisher Library is nearing completion after delays due to weather and events in the city that have required Harbord to remain fully accessible.

The remainder of the work will continue to take place on Saturdays and Sundays only, from 7 am to 7 pm. Work dates currently booked are: June 24, 25, July 8, 9, 22, 29, 30.

During this time:

  • The westbound traffic and bike lanes on Harbord Street will be closed at St. George Street

  • The westbound bike lane on Harbord Street will have detour signs posted (to direct the flow northbound on St. George Street to Sussex West, then to Huron South)

  • The eastbound traffic and bike lanes on Harbord Street will remain open

  • A no-left-turn sign will be posted for eastbound traffic on Harbord Street

  • Police Officers will be present to assist with traffic management

Questions? Please contact Margaret Wall, Library Administration: 416-978-1757 | margaret.wall@utoronto.ca


TSpace deposit support for Tri-Agency Open Access Policy compliance extended through April 2018

CIHR, SSHRC and NSERC grant recipients can comply with the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications by depositing their research to TSpace. This policy applies to all grants awarded by NSERC or SSHRC from May 1, 2015 and onward; and by CIHR from January 1, 2008 and onward.
 
Please reach out to faculty with whom you have relationships to let them know about this. The TSpace team encourages faculty to take advantage of the enhanced deposit support that has been extended through April 2018. The team will review individual publications or a body of publications, check for publisher permissions, deposit materials to TSpace, and provide authors with a permanent link to their publications.
 
Visit our First Time Users page or contact us to get started.

Scholars Portal Books redevelopment

Scholars Portal is pleased to announce the beta release of the new Scholars Portal Books platform. The redevelopment of the platform is a two-year project funded through the OCUL New Initiatives fund. The platform is backed by a new entitlements module and incorporates Scholars Portal’s long term work around migrating all books records to the BITS metadata standard.
 
We invite staff at OCUL schools to try searching, reading and downloading on the new platform, and to complete the feedback survey here: http://bit.ly/spbooksbeta
 
In the coming months, Scholars Portal staff will work to integrate concurrent-use restricted content, Shibboleth, the ACE portal, and an administrative module that will allow local e-resource staff to access title lists and usage reports. More on the two-year OCUL-funded project and the release timeline is available here: https://spotdocs.scholarsportal.info/display/sphome/Books+Redevelopment
 
The platform is in beta! There’s lots of work still to do, but we’re eager to hear the OCUL community’s feedback as we move to the next stage of development. Try out the new Scholars Portal Books platform here: https://booksbeta.scholarsportal.info.
 
In addition to the survey, questions and comments are welcome at books@scholarsportal.info.

U of T Showcase 150

In recognition of Canada 150, campus archives and special collections have come together to showcase their unique, diverse holdings within the context of 150 years of Canada's historical narrative.

With contributions from:

  • University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services
  • Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library
  • Victoria University Library Special Collections and Archives
  • University of St. Michael's College Archives

[read more and view the Showcase]

Week of June 19 - 23, 2017

Architecture Library Update

Contributed by Irene Puchalski

The Architecture, Landscape and Design Library has been renamed from the Shore + Moffat Library to the Eberhard Zeidler Library, and is now located at 1 Spadina Crescent. We are still getting our house in order and would like to welcome you more officially later this academic year.

OISE Makerspace Pop-Up Event

Contributed by Navroop Gill

On June 8 the OISE Library hosted a drop-in Makerspace Pop-up Event. The purpose of the event was to give teacher candidates an opportunity to try out maker resources from the OISE collection and consider how they might use these resources in their classrooms.

Students were given a ‘passport’ to visit 10 different stations which included activities like littleBits, K’Nex, Virtual Reality, a light up paper cat (by creating a circuit), and Makey Makey. Gerstein GSLA Chelsea Misquith operated the MADLab MakerBot printer to provide 3D printing demonstrations. There were also ‘unplugged’ options including origami, a typewriter and whiteboard tables which demonstrated the range of resources that can be used to tinker and explore.

In addition to hands-on kits, OISE Library’s print resource collection was highlighted. The collection includes books on tinkering, makerspaces, and coding for children. 

We received positive feedback from participants throughout the event and on social media. We look forward to hosting future makerspace events in the upcoming school year.

For more information on the OISE Makerspace event, please contact Navroop Gill at nk.gill@utoronto.ca.

CTV News coming to the Fisher Library

As a lead up to Canada Day, CTV has asked and has been given permission by the University to broadcast five portions of the live noon news on Tuesday, 27 June from the exhibition area of the Fisher Library. Because of the cables that will be brought into the library, and to ensure everyone’s safety, the library will be closed to new admissions that day between 11:00 am and 1:30 pm. A notice will be posted both in the building and online.

Week of June 5 - 9, 2017

UTL welcomes visitors from Shanghai and the People's Republic of China Consulate in Toronto 

Contributed by Jack Leong

On June 2, UTL welcomed the new Consul General of the People's Republic of China Consulate Office in Toronto, Mr. Wei He, and Cultural Consuls, Ms. Ning Han and Jingjing Sai. The visit included a meeting with Chief Librarian, Larry Alford, Deputy Chief Librarian, Julie Hannaford and Jack Leong, Director of the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library. Mr. He, Ms. Han and Ms. Sai expressed that they were impressed with our facilities and the unique treasures in the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library and the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library. 


On June 5, Dr. Guanghui Yang and Ms. Yuenan Zhao, Deputy Director and Director of the Secretariat, respectively, of the Fudan University Library in Shanghai also visited our libraries. Dr. Yang provided much helpful advice regarding the preservation and conservation of rare and delicate items from the Mu Collection in the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library. Dr. Yang and Ms. Zhao's visit also included a productive meeting with colleagues at ITS on digital preservation, big data, indexing and linked data for managing distributed datasets and research centers, as well as a tour of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library.

Week of May 29 - June 2, 2017

Keep@Downsview Ontario partnership finalized

A message from Larry Alford, Chief Librarian, University of Toronto Libraries

Dear colleagues,

I am delighted to announce that after several years of hard work and discussions at all levels of the university, the partnership previously known as the Downsview 5, now known as Keep@Downsview, has been formalized. The memorandum of agreement (MoA) was signed by all Universities and was officially announced May 30th. 

As you know from the presentations at town halls and other meetings, the Keep@Downsview partnership will share library preservation and storage facilities and services between the University of Toronto, University of Ottawa, Western University, McMaster University and Queen's University. This partnership is part of a larger movement in higher education for universities to collaborate to share resources and costs.

By preserving and maintaining these valuable collections, they will be available for generations to come. With demands on our space increasing while our research collections continue to grow, moving less used but very valuable research material to Downsview will increase space for study, research and collaboration. The partnership and shared facility will create exciting new opportunities for the development of new services and delivery options that will improve access to collections, including on demand digitization and electronic delivery services for journals currently only available in print.

The Keep@Downsview’s recent addition to the University of Toronto’s Downsview facility was funded, in part, through the Ministry of Training Colleges and Universities Productivity and Innovation Fund. Some capital, and all operating costs, will be shared amongst the five universities.

Many of our colleagues have dedicated countless hours to making this happen. I would like to acknowledge the work of Caitlin Tillman, Lari Langford, Marlene Van Ballegooie, Max Oxana, Julyia Borie and her students, Steve Marks, Marc Lalonde, Gordon Belray, Jesse Carliner, Alfred Cheng, Anne Dondertman, Laura Anderson, and Mark Philips and his team at Downsview. I am deeply grateful to everyone involved in making this exciting new partnership to preserve research collections for future generations a reality.

If you would like to learn more please contact contact Caitlin at caitlin.tillman@utoronto.ca.

With best regards,

Larry


Canada-Hong Kong Library team pulls together for a good cause

Contributed by Jack Leong, Director, Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library

For the third year in a row, the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library (CHKL) took part in the Orbis Plane Pull for Sight on Sunday, May 28. The sun was shining when the enthusiastic crew assembled on the tarmac. Led by Dr. Jack Leong, CHKL Director, the team members combined their strength to pull a Boeing 757 cargo plane and raise money for Orbis, an organization dedicated to training eye doctors and restoring vision worldwide.

We wish to thank everyone who came out to participate in the plane pull, as well as those who supported us with donations. A special acknowledgement goes to the Honourable Dr. Vivienne Poy, whose substantial contribution helped us raise $2,000. Thank you for your support of the team and of Orbis!

University of Toronto Libraries’ Orbis Plane Pull for Sight team.


Fisher Library & UTARMS draw 2,150 visitors for Doors Open

The Doors Open event at the Fisher Library and University of Toronto Archives on May 27 was a great success, with 2,150 visitors (up from last year's 1,648). Many people were overheard commenting on the wonderful building and the knowledgeable and welcoming staff. 

OISE Library Student Study Space Renewal Project

Contributed by Myrna Scully-Ashton - TALint Student, OISE Library

Studying at the OISE Library has become a lot more comfortable with the installation of our new furniture. This project is a continuation of our efforts to provide students with a more welcoming, collaborative and accessible study environment. As part of the OISE Library Student Study Space Renewal Project we have replaced all group study tables and chairs on our Concourse, 2nd, and 3rd Floors. Following the transfer of materials to Downsview, we were able to remove some of our shelving, and have increased the total number of seats at group study tables on the Concourse, 2nd, and 3rd Floors by 59%. Additional electrical outlets have been installed. These updates were much needed, as library seating was between 40 and 50 years old. Access to electrical outlets was also limited. The project included the addition of a wheelchair accessible study table on each of the three floors.

OISE students and faculty have responded enthusiastically to the new furniture, with particular excitement expressed about our new whiteboard tables.

Week of May 15 - 19, 2017

Fisher Library Condensation Control Project: Work continues after rain delay (Updated May 30)

The installation of new precast concrete panels on the outside of the Fisher Library is coming along after a short delay due to rainy weather. Crews have been utilizing a crane to hoist and install the new panels.

The remainder of the work will take place at the end of May and into June, on Saturdays and Sunday only, from 7 am to 7 pm (May 27, 28; June 3, 4, 10, 11, 17, 18, 24, 25 [new dates]). 

During this time:

  • The westbound traffic and bike lanes on Harbord Street will be closed at St. George Street

  • The westbound bike lane on Harbord Street will have detour signs posted (to direct the northbound flow on St. George Street to Sussex West, then to Huron South)

  • The eastbound traffic and bike lanes on Harbord Street will remain open

  • A no-left-turn sign will be posted for eastbound traffic on Harbord Street

  • Police Officers will be present to assist with traffic management

Weather permitting, this work is scheduled for completion by June 18.

Questions? Please contact Margaret Wall, Library Administration: 416-978-1757 | margaret.wall@utoronto.ca

Week of May 8 - 12, 2017

TRY+ 2017: Cultivating Connections

The thirteenth annual TRY+ (Toronto, Ryerson, York, OCAD) Library Staff Conference took place at St. Michael’s College in the University of Toronto on Tuesday, May 2. The conference provided an opportunity for all staff appointed members of the partner libraries to gather together for a day of learning, outstanding sessions and socializing with colleagues. This year, the libraries of the University of Toronto, York and Ryerson Universities welcomed OCAD University Library as a full partner.

(Photos by Stephen Hong. Left: from 'Expanding the Boundaries of Resource Discovery with Linked Data' presented by Marlene Van Ballegooie, Jennifer Browning and Bilal Khalid; Right: from 'How is Your Library Responding to the TRC Calls to Action? Part Two' presented by Jackie Esquimaux-Hamlin, Iehnhotonkwas Bonnie Jane Maracle, Jordan Hale, Whitney Kemble, Sara McDowell and Daniel Payne)


Announcing UTL Digital Scholarship Task Force

A new UTL Digital Scholarship Task Force has been convened to explore how UTL can best present our wealth of expertise in digital scholarship support to the broader university community.

UTL has a long record of supporting digital scholarship through staff expertise, outstanding collections and UTL’s leading-edge technological support of digital research. In recent years, as the needs, interests and activities of the university community in this area have grown, so too have the specialized staff and breadth of work undertaken at UTL in support of digital scholarship. However, at present, UTL’s work is carried out by staff who are dispersed across units, and our offerings are not always readily discoverable or clearly understood by our user community. The need for UTL to provide a “front door” to these services, either virtually, physically, or both, where digital scholarship services can be discovered, shaped and delivered, is now acute.

To this end, the ULT Executive Leadership Team has convened a Digital Scholarship Task Force to recommend what form these virtual and digital services should take. The task force membership is as follows:

  • Marcel Fortin, Head, Map and Data Library (Chair)
  • Adriana Balen, Manager, Capital Projects and Planning
  • Leslie Barnes, Digital Scholarship Librarian
  • Mariya Maistrovskaya, Institutional Repositories Librarian 

The task force will be engaging broadly with librarians and staff across UTL as they formulate their recommendations. The task force’s recommendations will be formed with reference to the needs of the St. George Campus community and, in particular, the needs for digital scholarship support within the humanities and social sciences. Their recommendations will consider how new spaces, physical or virtual, will interact with similar spaces on the UTM and UTSC campuses. They will also take into account existing space- and service-planning and digital scholarship initiatives across UTL and the university. The desired outcome is a plan for a digital scholarship “front door” at UTL that will promote and strengthen the coherent provision of future-facing, scalable digital scholarship services to the UofT community. The task force’s recommendations will be delivered this fall.

Please join us in thanking the members of the task force for their work in the coming months.

With best regards,

Sian Meikle, Director, Information Technology Services

Neil Romanosky, Associate Chief Librarian for Science Research and Information


First floor group study rooms at Robarts Library now bookable online 

In response to student feedback, the five group study rooms in the Information Commons on the ground floor of Robarts Library can now be booked by students online at: go.utlib.ca/bookastudyroom. 

As with the other bookable study rooms at Robarts Library, the ground floor rooms can be booked by groups of two or more students.


University of Toronto Libraries STAR Awards

We're pleased to announce that nominations are now open for the 3rd annual Staff Team Appreciation & Recognition (STAR) Awards. These awards acknowledge the extraordinary work of University of Toronto Libraries staff by recognizing notable team accomplishments that directly align with the Library's Strategic Plan.

The award for Ongoing Excellence acknowledges the unwavering, consistently excellent and collegial service teams do, year after year.

The award for Innovation recognizes a team working on a new project, service or other innovation, whether small or large.

Please consider nominating your own or another team to bring attention to the exceptional work occurring across our great libraries.

For further details, the nominations form, and other supporting documentation, visit our website at: http://library.utoronto.ca/star.

The deadline to apply is June 16, 2017. Please direct any questions you have to Erica Lenton (STAR Committee Chair), at: star.nominations@library.utoronto.ca.

We look forward to receiving your submissions!

Week of May 1 - 5, 2017

New Hires' Tea

On March 30, UTL staff gathered for a New Hires' Tea at the Fisher Library in honour of our new colleagues hired this year. The event provided an opportunity to put faces to all the new names, learn some 'fun facts' about each individual, and to officially welcome everybody to the UTL community. A great time was had by all!

Week of April 24 - 28, 2017

Dentistry Library wellness resources

Contributed by Helen He and Maria Zych

In order to help our users better manage stress, the Dentistry Library has created two resources that highlight wellness activities and services at U of T and in the surrounding community:

  • ​A new webpage lists some of the many wellness activities and services available at the University of Toronto and beyond. If you know of a wellness service or activity at the University of Toronto that we have missed, please let us know.
  • ​A new ‘Spotlight on Wellness’ information display is located in front our Service Desk. The display will be updated regularly and will feature different factors that impact stress and wellness. Our first spotlight introduces simple exercises which are short and easy to practice either at school or at home. The information on display covers short meditations, the importance of taking breaks during the day, and instructions for using progressive muscle relaxation with the meditations provided. The display also provides students with options for de-stressing and relaxing such as leisure reading, meditative colouring and yoga. Future topics to be covered will include: sleep, nutrition, mindfulness and self-care.​

Lindsay Nix, Student Library Assistant, was instrumental to the success of this project given her past work experience as a counsellor! We would also like to thank everyone who contributed to this project by either sharing their experience (Kathleen Schaeffer) or helping to set up the display (Julia Martyniuk). Also, thank you to Dr. Rayman, Director, Student Life, Faculty of Dentistry, and our student wellness officer, Diana Liu, for their input and support! 


Fisher Library Condensation Control Project: Temporary lane reduction on Harbord Street April 29 & 30

The next phase of the project to improve the thermal performance of the exterior of the Fisher Library will be the installation of new precast concrete panels over top of the insulation. 

Crews will be utilizing a crane onsite to hoist and install the new concrete panels. This work will take place from Saturday, April 29 through Thursday, May 4.

On Saturday, April 29 and Sunday, April 30, a portion of Harbord Street to be reduced to one lane from 7 am - 7 pm to accommodate the crane and other special equipment. From Monday, May 1 – Thursday, May 4, the crane and equipment will work from the construction zone on the St. George side of the Fisher Library.

Questions? Please contact Margaret Wall, Library Administration: 416-978-1757 | margaret.wall@utoronto.ca


Gerstein Science Information Centre elevators to undergo maintenance this summer

Contributed by Renata Holder

Beginning on May 1 the public elevator in the journal stacks wing will undergo modifications which will take it out of service until mid-July. It will be possible for users to access level 3 of the (5 level) journal stacks by using a ramp from 1 Below in the Sig Sam building. A retrieval service will be available for users who need assistance.

The freight elevator will undergo maintenance following completion of work on the journal stacks elevator, taking it out of service until early September. Work on the freight elevator will not impact library users. 

Week of April 3 - 7, 2017

Borrow-a-bike now available for UTL staff

As one of this year's Chief Librarian's Innovation Grants, UTL has purchased a Brompton folding bike that can be used by all library staff for short trips around the St. George campus. The bike has a telescoping seat that is easily adjustable for riders of any height so that all staff can use it. We will be providing information shortly on the sign-out system and will be working with Campus Police to provide all interested users with basic bike safety training. Further details to come.

We would like to thank Eric, Melissa, and the rest of the team at Curbside Cycle for helping us select, test ride, and put together the right bicycle for our needs.

 


U of T honoured as one of Canada's best diversity employers for 2017

U of T has been named one of Canada’s Best Diversity Employers for 2017. We have received this honour for a decade: each year since the Award’s inception. For more information on the reasons for selection, please visit U of T’s Canada's Top 100 Employer page.


iRelax, do you?

Contributed by Kathleen Scheaffer

Mindfulness practices have been empirically shown to be an effective way to reduce stress, regulate emotions and increase focus.

iRelax, a mindfulness resource area, located just past the stacks on the 4th floor of the Faculty of Information's Inforum, is here to assist you with dropping into the present moment throughout the year. iRelax offers its visitors yoga mats, meditation cushions, meditation benches, blocks, and print learning resources on a first-come, first-served basis for use throughout the Inforum. iRelax is an opportunity to learn or reinforce what you already know about mindful practices at your own speed.

By connecting our community to secular mindfulness resources, ethical and sustainable materials, and links to on-campus learning opportunities, like mindful moments, we hope to facilitate the development and/or expansion of our community’s wellness toolkits.

Come to the Inforum and get your mindfulness on!

If you have questions, comments, or suggestions, please feel free to contact Kathleen Scheaffer, kathleen.scheaffer@utoronto.ca.


Office 365 for staff and faculty

Staff and faculty at the University of Toronto will soon have access to Microsoft’s Office 365 for Education suite. Office 365 includes e-mail, calendaring, data storage, online versions of Office applications such as Word, Excel, PowerPoint, instant messaging via Skype for Business, video conferencing, and many other applications.

Following a rigorous RFP process and negotiations with Microsoft, the University of Toronto has signed an agreement with Microsoft Canada for Office 365 for Faculty and Staff. “This initiative enables U of T’s faculty and staff to join over 227,000 students and alumni already benefiting from the Office 365 suite since June 2011,” says Scott Mabury, Vice-President, University Operations.

This cloud-based collaboration suite will significantly improve the tools available to faculty, staff and students, enable greater communication, and equip them with the resources they need for teaching, research, study, and administrative services.

Office 365 for U of T will be hosted in Microsoft’s secure Canadian data centres.

Implementation

  • Student and alumni email accounts are being prepared for repatriation to the Canadian data centres beginning in late April 2017.
  • Once the migration into the Canadian data centres has been completed, preparations for the migration of faculty and staff email accounts will begin.
  • The anticipated timeline for faculty and staff account migration from UTORexchange to Office 365 will begin with a target pilot testing group in July 2017.
  • Faculty members who wish to opt out of Office 365 and remain on the existing UTORexchange service will have the opportunity to declare their intention during departmental implementation planning.
  • An implementation plan is in development and further details will be available over the coming months.

[full details]

Week of March 27 - 31, 2017

Register Now! 2017 TRY+ Library Staff Conference

Tuesday, May 2, 2017 • St. Michael’s College • University of Toronto

Visit our website at http://www.library.utoronto.ca/try2017/ to view this year’s presentations, check the schedule, and register for the conference. We look forward to a day of outstanding sessions FREE to all staff appointed members of the University of Toronto, Ryerson, York, and OCAD University Libraries.

Space is limited so register early to avoid disappointment. Registration will close at 11:59 pm on Monday, April 17, 2017.

The TRY+ Library Staff Conference is hosted by the University of St. Michael’s College in the University of Toronto.

Week of March 20 - 24, 2017

Fisher Library Condensation Control Project: Temporary lane reduction on Harbord Street - dates to be announced 

The next phase of the project to improve the thermal performance of the exterior of the Fisher Library will be the installation of new precast concrete panels over top of the insulation. 

Crews will be utilizing a crane onsite to hoist and install the new concrete panels. This will require a portion of Harbord Street to be reduced to one lane from 7 am - 7 pm, on weekends only, to accommodate special equipment. Specific dates for this work will be announced as soon as they are available. The installation will begin on the east elevation of the building and will move clockwise to the west elevation. Once complete, the new exterior will match the existing look of the building.

The renovations are now expected to be completed by June 2017.

Questions? Please contact Margaret Wall, Library Administration: 416-978-1757 | margaret.wall@utoronto.c

 

Week of March 6 - 10, 2017

Plane Pull for Sight Library Team

Contributed by Jack Leong

Dear colleagues,

Last year, some of you participated in the 2016 Orbis Plane Pull for Sight.  The event was a lot of fun, and the library team raised close to $2500. This year, we will be returning to the tarmac of the FedEx Apron at the Pearson International Airport for the 3rd time in a row, and we'd like to invite you to join us.

For those of you unfamiliar with the event and the organization, Orbis is an international charity that provides training opportunities for doctors in developing countries, supports vision and eye health, and sponsors the world's only flying eye hospital. Over the past seven years, the Plane Pull has attracted over 15,000 participants across the country and raised more than $500,000 to support Orbis’s vision saving efforts.

The Libraries have been challenged to form a team of 20 people and compete to pull a FedEx 757 cargo plane 20 feet across the tarmac in record time on Sunday, May 28!

Thanks to the generous sponsorship of the Hon. Dr. Vivienne Poy, the team's minimum fundraising amount has already been met.

In addition to the plane pull itself, there will also a host of other activities for both adults and children - music, entertainment, educational demonstrations, interactive tours, tasty food and more!

If you are interested in participating in this year's Plane Pull for Sight Team, please respond to Jack Leong (jack.leong@utoronto.ca) by Monday, March 20.


Notice of Crane Activity: Fisher Library Condensation Control Project

As you know, we have been renovating the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library to improve the thermal performance of the exterior, which will prevent condensation inside the building. Insulation has been applied to the building. The next phase of the project will see new precast concrete panels installed over top of the insulation.

Crews will be utilizing a crane onsite to hoist and install the new concrete panels. This will require a portion of Harbord Street to be reduced to one lane from 7 am - 7 pm on weekends only at some point in March to accommodate special equipment. Specific dates for this work will be announced as soon as they are available. The installation will begin on the east elevation of the building and will move clockwise to the west elevation. Once complete, the new exterior will match the existing look of the building.

Entrance to the Fisher Library during renovations

During construction, entrance to the Fisher Library will be through either the east or west staircase of Robarts Library at various times during the project. The main entrance from St. George Street to Robarts Library will be accessible at all times.

The renovations are expected to be completed by April 2017.

Questions? Please contact Margaret Wall, Library Administration: 416-978-1757 | margaret.wall@utoronto.ca

 

Week of February 27 - March 3, 2017

New seeds in the Inforum branch of the Toronto Seed Library

Contributed by Nalini Singh

Spring is in the air! A new shipment of seeds has just arrived at the Inforum branch of the Toronto Seed Library. We’ve got leafy greens, herbs, spinach, eggplant, tomatoes, radish and more!  Come get some. If you visited us at Robarts Library 1st floor last summer, note that we have moved back to our permanent home at the Faculty of Information, 140 St. George Street, 4th & 5th floors. http://uoft.me/inforum-seed-library-branch

Week of February 20 - 24, 2017

Chief Librarian's Innovation Grants – Round II

A message from Larry P. Alford, Chief Librarian, University of Toronto Libraries

Dear Colleagues,

Last year I launched a new initiative to encourage innovation and experimentation within the University of Toronto Libraries. With the success of the pilot, where nine of 13 proposals were awarded grants, I am very pleased to announce that we will once again be offering project funding through the Chief Librarian’s Innovation Grants program. 

Chief Librarian’s Innovation Grants challenge staff to test new ideas while also fostering a culture of exploration, innovation and collaboration across the Libraries. This is an opportunity for staff to apply for one-time-only (OTO) funding to work on original projects that have the potential to be transformative for the U of T Libraries and the communities that we serve. I hope that this program will inspire bold thinking, and will lead to creative partnerships with colleagues inside and outside the Libraries. I will personally be reviewing and approving the grants.

The application process:

  1. Proposals can be developed by any appointed staff member, but must have a project leader who holds an appointed position within the central libraries. There are no limits to the types of projects which can be proposed, other than that they should have clear objectives, be innovative in nature, and not require continuing funding.

  2. Submissions should be no more than two pages, and must include:

    1. A description of how the project will benefit the targeted community

    2. A workplan

    3. A budget

    4. A timeline

    5. A list of team members

    6. The name of the central libraries lead who will be responsible for managing the project

  3. While all submissions must have a central libraries project leader, projects that include the participation of faculty, non-library staff and/or students are encouraged, as is participation from staff from the faculty libraries, the libraries at UTM and UTSC, and the Federated Libraries.

  4. Funds are only for OTO costs. Continuing staff positions cannot be hired with these funds. The funds may, however, be used to hire temporary staff. 

  5. Projects funds must be spent between May 1, 2017 – April 30, 2018.

Submissions are due Thursday, March 30, 2017 by 5:00 pm. Please send your submissions to Laura Anderson (l.anderson@utoronto.ca) who will compile the applications for my review. Funding decisions will be announced in April 2017.

I look forward to receiving your applications. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Laura or me.

With best regards,

Larry


Celebrating 125 years of excellence - UTL anniversary buttons now available

 

 

Staff buttons commemorating the University of Toronto Libraries' 125th anniversary were sent out to all UTL libraries last week. If you would like additional buttons for staff at your library, please contact the Communications Office at communications.assistant@utoronto.ca with the number of additional buttons required. 

 


Submit Your 2017 TRY+ Conference Proposal! Time is Running Out!

2017 TRY+ LIBRARY STAFF CONFERENCE CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Cultivating Connections

S.R. Ranaganathan’s fifth law of library science, “The Library is a Growing Organism,” offers a compelling metaphor. TRY+ 2017 will explore how academic libraries have nurtured connections with communities by cultivating services, collections and spaces. Envisioning the library as an ecosystem allows us to learn from natural models in order to foster sustainable networks in support of knowledge creation. Cultivating connections helps libraries transplant old models and systems into new information environments, allowing the creation of fertile ecologies of learning.

About the Conference

The thirteenth annual TRY+ (Toronto, Ryerson, York, OCAD) Library Staff Conference will take place on Tuesday, May 2, 2017 at St. Michael’s College in the University of Toronto. This free, one-day conference provides an opportunity for all staff appointed members of the partner libraries to gather together for a day of learning, outstanding sessions, and socializing with colleagues. This year, the libraries of the University of Toronto, York, and Ryerson Universities welcome OCAD University Library as a full partner.

Submit a Proposal!

All staff appointed members of the University of Toronto, Ryerson, York, and OCAD University Libraries are eligible to submit presentation and poster session proposals. Current iSchool students are eligible to submit proposals for poster sessions.

Proposal forms are in Microsoft Word format. Download them from the conference website. Submit by email when completed. The deadline is Sunday, February 26, 2017.

Visit http://www.library.utoronto.ca/try2017/

The TRY+ Library Staff Conference is hosted by the University of St. Michael’s College in the University of Toronto.

Week of February 13 - 17, 2017

Bora Laskin Law Library Hosts National Research-a-thon

Contributed by Gian Medves, Interim Chief Law Librarian

On Saturday, February 4, 840 participants from all 22 law schools across the country joined together to complete over 3,000 hours of research on the legal issues related to the recent travel bans in the United States and their Canadian impact.

The aim of the event was to assist the Canadian Council for Refugees (CCR) with potential legal challenges to the Safe Third Country Agreement and related legal mandates of the CCR.

To assist students in their research here at the University of Toronto, the Bora Laskin Law Library put together a research guide on Immigration Law. It lists and links to resources on refugee law, extradition, judicial review and US immigration law. The research guide will be updated as the issues develop in the U.S. and here in Canada.

The Library has also arranged for immediate access to the Immigration Law & Policy in the U.S. collection on HeinOnline. This collection features historical documents and legislation related to immigration in the United States, as well as current hearings, debates and recent developments in immigration law. This database also includes BIA Precedent Decisions, legislative histories, law and policy titles, extradition titles, scholarly articles, an extensive bibliography and other related works.

The country-wide event was a smashing success, with over 3,000 hours of research completed and $7,000 raised for the Canadian Council for Refugees. Here at U of T, Law Librarians were on hand to answer reference questions, and social media was abuzz with posts from students documenting the process using the #Research4Refugees hashtag.

Thank you card to the Bora Laskin Law Librarians from participating students after the event. Photo by  LaskinLawLib


Response to US travel restrictions

Dear Colleagues,

I know you share my deep concern about the recent executive order by the US President to exclude from the United States travelers and refugees from seven predominantly Muslim countries. There is no justification possible for discrimination on the basis of religion and country of origin. Libraries and educational institutions are sustained by the free flow and expression of ideas and people. Excluding people because of their origin or religion strikes at the fabric of academic freedom, free thought, learning and research. An exclusion of this nature diminishes all of us.

University of Toronto departments and offices across the three campuses are speaking out against this ban and in support of our affected colleagues and students. In particular, I would like draw your attention to the statement issued by President Gertler: https://www.utoronto.ca/news/university-toronto-keeping-close-watch-impact-us-travel-restrictions, as well as the statement from Provost Regehr and Vice President Hannah-Moffat: http://memos.provost.utoronto.ca/us-travel-restrictions-pdadc-59/.

For any of our colleagues personally impacted by the travel ban, the library will do everything possible to help. I know I speak for all of us in saying that our thoughts are with our Muslim colleagues and friends who are such a vital and valued part of the library and university community. 

Sincerely yours,

Larry P. Alford

Chief Librarian

University of Toronto

Week of February 6 - 10, 2017

The Gerstein Book Stop now open - a new leisure reading collection for students and staff

In keeping with our library’s goal of promoting a culture of wellness, the Gerstein Science Information Centre is excited to unveil its first leisure reading collection and space, The Gerstein Book Stop, which opened on February 1.

This new collection consists of recently published fiction titles, similar to what you might find at a public library. We hope to offers our visitors a respite from studying and research by providing a collection and space to read and relax with books that are purely fun!

The Gerstein Book Stop is conveniently located in our lobby (right side, across from the Loans Desk). Everyone is invited to come in and browse the collection, and also borrow a book or two. Feel free to spread the word to students and faculty, as well as check out the collection yourself!

For more information, visit this page:  https://gerstein.library.utoronto.ca/content/gerstein-book-stop-leisure-reading-collection


Mourning the Quebec City shooting victims

Dear colleagues, 

I know that we all are deeply saddened by the tragic and utterly senseless deaths at a mosque in Quebec City, and our thoughts are with the family and friends of those who lost their lives. This horrible event is all the more disturbing, because a place of worship should be a safe place, a place of complete security. This sort of violence based on hate is completely unacceptable in any society, and is a threat to our very civilization. We must all speak out against racism and islamophobia whenever we witness it. 

I believe the university and the library is, at its heart, a place where we value diversity and difference and stand against hatred and bigotry in any form. All members of our communities are welcome here at the U of T Libraries, and we remain steadfast in our commitment to create inclusive and welcoming spaces.

I invite you to read the President’s Statement on the Events in Quebec City: http://www.president.utoronto.ca/statement-on-the-events-in-quebec-city

Sincerely yours,

Larry P. Alford

Chief Librarian

University of Toronto

Week of January 30 - February 3, 2017

UTL Dragon Boat Team 2017 – Call for Members!

For the third year, UTL’s Dragon Boat Team “Library of Conquest” is calling for members! Participants of all levels are welcome to join – whether you are a returning member, or new to the sport of dragon boating.

This year, we will be practicing from 7pm to 8pm on Fridays, tentatively starting on May 5 and leading up to racing at the Canada Day Regatta on July 1, 2017 (which is Canada’s 150th birthday!), on Toronto’s Centre Island.

The practice site is located on Ashbridges Bay at the Balmy Beach Canoe Club. Located at the intersection of Lakeshore Boulevard and Coxwell Avenue, it is easy to reach by car or public transit. For more information on the practice site, please see here.

Last year, we had a great time sharing the boat for over two months, filled with laughter and workouts. Our outstanding collaborative effort eventually brought the team a gold medal for the division we raced in during the Canada Day Regatta. Here’s a report on last year’s event.

To sign up for this year’s team, please fill out this form before February 15, 2017. The cost per participant is about $130, which includes boat and equipment rental, coaching and participation in the race. Our team’s 2017 webpage will be created soon. Last year’s webpage can be found here.

If you have any questions, please contact Jack Leong (jack.leong@utoronto.ca).

Week of January 23 - 27, 2017

U of T Libraries joins the Biodiversity Heritage Library

The University of Toronto Libraries is pleased to announce that we have joined the Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) as a new Member. UTL is the first Canadian library to join.

The University of Toronto Libraries system is the largest academic library in Canada. Ranked fourth among North American peer institutions by the Association of Research Libraries, the UTL system is particularly strong in the sciences and includes 10 dedicated science libraries. Among these is the Gerstein Science Information Centre, Canada’s largest standalone science and health library. Additionally, the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library holds rich collections on the history of science and medicine, including an exhaustive collection of original works by Charles Darwin. For the full list of contributing institutions and their content, including the U of T science libraries, please visit the contributor's page on the BHL's website: http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/browse/contributors.

“The University of Toronto Libraries is thrilled to become a Member of the Biodiversity Heritage Library,” asserts Neil Romanosky, UTL’s Associate Chief Librarian for Science Research and Information, and Director of the Gerstein Science Information Centre. “Given the rapid rate of extinction of species across the globe, we see membership in BHL as an important opportunity to support the search for knowledge by preserving our wealth of historic biodiversity materials and sharing them more widely.”

As a BHL Member, the University of Toronto Libraries will enhance BHL’s collection by contributing rare and unique material from its holdings of over 12 million print volumes. As the host of an Internet Archive (IA) scanning center, the UTL has already digitized a large portion of its collection. Over 3.3 million pages of natural history literature from UTL are currently available in BHL.

“The University of Toronto Libraries and BHL share a commitment to open access and the promotion of digital scholarship through global partnerships and the development of innovative tools and technology,” affirms BHL Program Director Martin R. Kalfatovic. “We look forward to the expertise and leadership that UTL will bring to the BHL consortium as we work together to build our online collection, enhance our services, and empower researchers around the world through free access to biodiversity knowledge.”

About the Biodiversity Heritage Library

BHL is a consortium of major natural history, botanical and research libraries that seek to contribute to the global “biodiversity commons” by digitizing and providing free and open access to biodiversity literature and archives from across the globe. For more information, visit the Biodiversity Heritage Library website: www.biodiversitylibrary.org.

Recent visitors to UTL

Contributed by Jack Leong

(Left: Professor Seamus Ross and Jack Leong with the Anhui Provincial Archives delegation; Right: MP Arnold Chan, Jack Leong, visiting professor Kui-wai Li, and Jean Yip)

The University of Toronto Libraries received the following international and government visitors recently:

Jan 10, 2017  - Kevin O’Donovan, Acquisition Manager, London School of Economics and Political Science Library

Jan 16, 2017 - Anhui Provincial Archives Delegation, led by Deputy Director-General Qianlong Cheng

Jan 17, 2017 - Angharad Roberts, Information Specialist, University of Leicester, United Kingdom

Jan 18, 2017 – Member of Parliament Arnold Chan and his wife Jean Yip

These visitors were amazed by our collections, facilities and services. They exchanged ideas and knowledge with our colleagues regarding collection development, digital initiatives, data management, outreach and possible collaboration in training information professionals.

Protecting treasured books - City News reports on the Fisher Library condensation control project

We have been renovating the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library to improve the thermal performance of the exterior, which will prevent condensation inside the building. Insulation has been applied to the east side of the building. Work is now progressing to the west side. Once complete, the new exterior will match the existing look of the building.

City News went behind the scenes this week to find out more about this project to protect the rare books contained within.

[watch the clip]

Entrance to the Fisher Library during renovations

During construction, entrance to the Fisher Library will be through either the east or west staircase of Robarts Library at various times during the project. Work has now moved to the west side of the building and the east staircase has re-opened. The west staircase is now closed temporarily. The main entrance from St. George Street to Robarts Library will be accessible at all times.

The renovations are expected to be completed by April 2017.

Questions? Please contact Margaret Wall, Library Administration: 416-978-1757 | margaret.wall@utoronto.ca

University of Toronto Libraries Undergraduate Research Prize now entering its second year

Contributed by Heather Buchansky

The University of Toronto Libraries is seeking submissions for this year's University of Toronto Libraries Undergraduate Research Prize. The six prizes, each worth $1000, will be awarded to current undergraduate students enrolled at the University of Toronto during the 2016-17 academic year. Entry deadline is April 15, 2017.

The Undergraduate Research Prize provides students with the opportunity to:

  • reflect on their information-seeking experience

  • showcase their research to an audience beyond the classroom

  • promote scholarship excellence at the undergraduate level at the University of Toronto

Last year, 50 submissions were received, with the winning submissions uploaded to TSpace.

If you are teaching any undergraduate courses and/or are consulting with undergraduate students that have demonstrated effective and innovative use of information sources in their research assignments, please encourage them to apply for this prize.

More information, including how to apply, can be found at: http://go.utlib.ca/libprize 

Please note: a letter of support is also required from the course instructor.

Launching the Behind the Scenes Video Series at UTL

Contributed by Jesse Carliner and Heather Buchansky

A new playlist has been added to the UTL YouTube channel - Behind the Scenes at University of Toronto Libraries. To launch the series, the first video was added last week. “The Journey of the Book” describes how a book gets from the mailroom to the shelf. This idea was suggested by patrons, staff, and the U of T media relations committee when asked what they would like to know about the libraries.

The format of the video was inspired by narrated photo slideshows commonly seen in media outlets such as The New York Times. This video was created by Jesse Carliner and Heather Buchansky, and narrated by Houman Behzadi. The script and photos were developed with Alastair Boyd in the Cataloguing Department, and Alexa Evans and Hasmik Torossian in the Collection Development Department.

The video was promoted on Twitter with a Tweet thread highlighting key photos from the video with captions and a link to the full photo. The Tweet has been viewed almost 7,500 times. The video will be be promoted on the library website and in an FAQ. Please feel free to share and embed the video where relevant to your users.

If you or your library or department are interested in creating your own ‘Behind the Scenes’ video, please contact either Jesse Carliner (jesse.carliner@utoronto.ca) or Heather Buchansky (heather.buchansky@utoronto.ca), who can help get you started.

Week of January 16 - 20, 2017

Final Report of the Steering Committee of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

Contributed by Desmond Wong, Outreach Librarian, OISE Library

The Final Report of the Steering Committee of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission for the University of Toronto was released last Friday. This Report has many implications for the University, and has a specific section on the Calls To Action as related to the University of Toronto Library System. This Report will guide many University policies moving forward. It would be beneficial to read the Report as it has implications to the work of librarians across the System.

I would especially like to draw your attention to the pages of the report relating to the Library System, on page 19, 110 and 112.

Week of January 9 - 13, 2017

Dentistry Library celebrates Ontario Dental Association's 150th anniversary

Contributed by Maria Buda

In addition to Canada's 150th birthday, 2017 marks the 150th anniversary of the Ontario Dental Association (ODA). A display featuring the founders of the ODA is available online. A physical display is also set up at the Dentistry Library featuring a selection of dental books and topics of interest in 1867. Learn about the efforts of the dentists who established the ODA and created the first dental legislation in North America, an Act Respecting Dentistry (1868). The Act enabled dentists in Ontario to regulate the profession and open a dental school in 1875, the Royal College of Dental Surgeons, which later became the Faculty of Dentistry at U of T.

Dr. Kui-Wai Li joins the Canada-Hong Kong Library as Visiting Professor 

Contributed by Jack Leong, Director, Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library

I am very pleased to announce that Dr. Kui-Wai Li has joined the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library and the Asian Institute at the Munk School of Global Affairs as Visiting Professor from today to June 30, 2017. As a macro-economist, Dr. Li obtained his undergraduate and postgraduate qualifications from the United Kingdom, the Netherlands and the United States. In addition to his long service in the City University of Hong Kong, Dr. Li has taught in Nigeria, Switzerland and Lithuania, and previously visited numerous universities, including Yale University, Tokyo University and the University of Toronto. His specialities include Asian economics, political economy, development economics, globalization and financial crisis, and monetary economics. Dr. Li has published a number of academic papers and authored several books. During his visiting professorship, he will work on his forthcoming book from Elsevier entitled “Redefining Capitalism in Global Economic Development”.

Week of January 2 - 6, 2017

U of T Libraries turns 125 this year!       

As part of the celebrations, we have created an anniversary e-mail signature template for use by UTL employees. The logo was designed collaboratively by Amanda Wagner, Maureen Morin and Gordon Belray, who designed the icon. The icon depicts the first library building at the University of Toronto which opened for use in 1892. That original structure is part of the Gerstein Science and Information Centre where library users can still study in the original reading room.

[download the e-mail signature template] For the password, see the January 3, 2017 issue of the In the Loop e-mail digest, or e-mail margaret.wall@utoronto.ca or jesse.carliner@utoronto.ca.

We have lots of exciting things planned to celebrate our 125th anniversary, both online and off. Stay tuned!


Robarts Library now offers extended weekend hours for research support through the Ask Us service

In response to increased demand for research and library support at Robarts Library, the Reference and Research Services Department will be extending the hours of its 2nd floor Ask Us service on Saturdays and Sundays from 11 am - 5 pm during the regular academic year.  

This change comes as part of our ongoing commitment to user-centred, evidence-based service design. Use of the Ask Us service, which offers high quality, on the spot user support as part of a continuum of service for in-building users, has increased dramatically over last year at this time when research support was offered on the 4th floor. Statistics show that we are also now reaching many more students – our primary in-person community. An additional benefit of the 2nd floor location and our use of Slack has been increased interactions and knowledge sharing between iStaff, graduate student staff, public service staff and librarians.


The Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library releases the winter issue of the EAL Newsletter

Contributed by Lucy Gan

The Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library is happy to present the winter issue of the EAL Newsletter (Iss. 2, Vol. 16, 2016)!

Features include:

  • EAL Fall Event Highlights
  • Towards the Future of the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library -- An Interview with Hana Kim, Director of the EAL
  • Tracing the Roots of the Mu Collection
  • Notable Acquisitions
  • Library and Staff Activities

[Download the entire issue]

Week of December 12 - 16, 2016

Government Information Day 2016

Contributed by Margaret Wall

Over 130 information professionals representing a broad spectrum of public, legal, academic, media, government and other special libraries and archives, gathered at the University of Toronto for the fourth annual Government Information Day on December 9.

The conference was initiated in 2013 by Government Information Librarian Sam-chin Li, and has since been held at the University of Ottawa, the University of Waterloo, and now again in Toronto.  

At the time of the inaugural conference, access to government information was under threat due to the planned closure of the print Depository Services Program and pending migration of all government department websites to one central site, resulting in the potential loss to the public of many government documents.

The government information community quickly organized itself to address these challenges and has accomplished much in the intervening years as a result, including UTL-led web archiving and digitization initiatives, and the creation at UTL of a registry of digitized government information.

Since its creation, Government Information Day has been a forum for engaging with colleagues about these issues and sparking collaborative projects which help ensure government information is accessible for generations to come. This year’s conference featured updates on many of these projects, as well as thought-provoking presentations which delved into some of the ethical issues surrounding access to information.

Keynote speaker Dr. Ann Cavoukian spoke about challenges for privacy created by the internet and other advances in information communications technology. Toronto Star reporter Jim Rankin used several interesting examples of stories made possible by Freedom of Information requests to illustrate how Access to Information legislation helps the media serve the public good. Amanda Wakaruk, Copyright Librarian at the University of Alberta, spoke about the advantages and disadvantages of keeping government information out of the public domain in terms of copyright.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Left to right: Dr. Ann Cavoukian; audience members

University of Toronto PhD student Tanya Whyte took the audience through the new Linked Parliamentary Data Project (LiPaD), which provides access to the Hansard from 1901 forward. Sam-chin Li provided an update on the LOCKSS (Lots of Copies Keep Stuff Safe) program, which protects government information through distributed archives at 10 partner sites across Canada, and a project to provide access by title to the digitized Sessional Papers of Canada from 1901 through 1925 - a significant time-saver for researchers. Federal and provincial government representatives shared updates about Open Government initiatives to be more open in the way information is shared. Rolla Haddad and Jamila Hastick of the Library of Parliament illuminated the process for tracking down government motions online. Margaret Wall presented an update on the new Registry of Canadian Government Information Digitization Projects she created with support from ITS, which will streamline access to digitized government documents. As well, 26 conference attendees participated in a special tour of the Fisher Library led by PJ Carefoote, which highlighted historical government documents and provided a sneak peak at the upcoming 150 year anniversary exhibit.

With special thanks to Julie Hannaford for giving welcoming remarks at the event and to Debbie Green for giving the closing remarks. 

Photo credit: Jesse Carliner

Organizing committee: Kyla Everall (lead), Sam-chin Li, Nich Worby, Margaret Wall

Special thanks to: Maureen Morin, Jesse Carliner, Lindsay Harker, Karine Bourgeois

Reminder: TCard services for students moving to Koffler Centre in January

Beginning January 2, TCard Services for students will be permanently located on the first floor of the Koffler Student Services Centre (214 College Street), in what will be the newly-renovated area that houses the Academic Success Centre, Career Centre and Housing Services. 

TCard services for staff and faculty will be provided at the Reader Registration desk at Robarts Library during service hours (Monday - Saturday, 9 am - 5 pm) or by contacting Reader Registration at 416-978-7694 or reader.reg@utoronto.ca

For central libraries, the issuance of staff ID cards/keys will move to Reader Registration. Supervisors or Department Heads will submit requests to Ikee Gibson to have the card access profiles set up. He will inform Reader Registration when the card is ready for the photo and printing. 

The physical move of the TCard Office from Robarts Library to the Koffler Centre will take place on December 19. A TCard kiosk will operate on the second floor of Robarts Library on December 19 and 20.  

Faculty and staff who have questions about TCard Services are encouraged to contact Arlene Clement, Director, Housing & TCard Services, at arlene.clement.utoronto.ca, or Ursula Shail, Manager of TCard Services, at ursula.shail@utoronto.ca.

Portal help support services over the holiday break

The U of T Holiday Break begins Wednesday December 21st. Very limited Portal Support services for the portal.help@utoronto.ca email address will be available on the following days:
               
Dec 21st, 22nd, 27th, 28th, 29th and 30th.

Portal Help staff will not be on site during the break. Staff will check and respond to emails only periodically on the days mentioned above. They will not be able to provide full support services including course, grade and content retrieval, and manual instructor enrolment requests. Please be aware that Portal Help staff cannot manually enrol people in Portal courses. For example, instructors who are requesting access to a course website in advance of formally being hired and/or placed inside ROSI must be processed by the Business Officer or by HR in their department or division.

An Instructor Guide is available on the Portal Information website with instructions on accessing Portal courses, common course tasks, troubleshooting issues and support resources.

Instructors who are putting together their course materials can refer to the Organize Your Course guide. This guide provides instructors and course staff with additional tips and tricks to help customize the appearance of their course, organize course materials and declutter, while creating a clean, easy-to-navigate course site that is engaging for students.

Full Portal Help support services will resume Monday January 2nd, 2017.

The ITS System Status webpage provides an overview of current service status messages and scheduled maintenance for U of T systems and services including supported educational technologies in the Academic Toolbox (e.g., Portal (Blackboard), Remark Office and Turnitin). Subscribe by email to receive updates.

Week of December 5 - 9, 2016

2016 PJRC Update now available

Contributed by Ksenya Kiebuzinski

The Petro Jacyk Central & East European Resource Centre’s annual newsletter, the PJRC Update, has just been published. Read about the exhibition Crime and Punishment at 150: Global Contexts, plus take an armchair literary-musical tour of Toronto’s Eastern European landmarks, discover drama and intrigue in Siberia, and learn about the University of Toronto Libraries’ Stalin-era archival resources.

[read the full newsletter]

Week of November 28 - December 1, 2016

Announcing the Fisher Library's summer seminar series

The Fisher Library is excited to announce a new educational initiative beginning next June: a summer seminar series. Directed at information professionals, scholars and students in Canadian institutions, the Fisher's summer seminar series reflects the library's commitment to foster the search for knowledge through our collections and expertise in special collections. As Canada’s largest rare book library, we hope this is the first step in the road to building a stronger sense of community among special collection libraries and archives in Canada. The Fisher is grateful for the Chief Librarian’s Innovation Grant it received, which enabled it to initiate the series.

The first seminar the library is offering is the History and Identification of Book Illustration. The three-day seminar will address the most notable techniques of book illustrations, including woodcuts, engravings, etchings, stipple, aquatints, mezzotints, lithography, wood engravings and steel engravings, among other processes developed before 1860. Divided into short lectures, hands-on sessions, demonstrations from local artists and collection displays, the seminar will be led by Dr. Rowan Watson, Senior Curator Emeritus at the National Art Library in the Victoria and Albert Museum.

The seminar will take place from June 5-7, 2017, to coincide with the end of the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences (May 27-June 2, 2017). Applications are open to librarians, archivists, scholars, antiquarian booksellers and graduate students in Canada, with preference given to applicants whose work and/or research will benefit from attending the seminar. Registration costs will be covered for accepted applicants, which includes the registration fee, course materials and lunch during the three days. Successful applicants are expected to cover their own transportation and accommodation costs.

Applicants are asked to submit an application form (click link to download) and a Curriculum Vitae of no more than three pages by Tuesday, January 31, 2017. For further information please contact David Fernández at david.fernandez@utoronto.ca.

[Download the call for applications form]

Week of November 21 - 25, 2016

Bond collection on display at UTM's Finance Learning Centre 

Contributed by Helen Kula

Most students today experience finance and the capital markets as purely digital phenomena – numbers on a screen continuously updating in real-time. However, thanks to a generous donation from a UTM finance professor, students at UTM now have the opportunity to experience a key financial instrument – a bond – in its original, analog, paper-based format.

On Thursday, November 10, the Li Koon Chun Finance Learning Centre (FLC) unveiled a display of early 20th century bond certificates taken from a collection donated to the UTM Library by Professor Louis Florence. 

These certificates date from the period 1909 to 1918 and were issued by various municipalities located in post-World War I Germany. Acquired under unknown circumstances by Professor Florence’s grandfather after he immigrated to Canada in 1920, these were passed down through the Florence family until their donation to the library.

A selection of bonds from this collection has been mounted behind the teaching podium within the FLC. There, they will serve as a teaching resource to supplement and enhance the teaching about fixed income and more broadly, finance, at UTM. 

These bonds were unveiled at a reception hosted by the UTM Library and the Department of Management to acknowledge the donation. The reception included both Professor Florence and members of his extended family as well as faculty, students and staff from both the Library and the Institute for Management and Innovation. 


Open House at the Fisher Library

Contributed by John Shoesmith

The Fisher Library hosted a steady stream of staff and other visitors this past Thursday when it held its first-ever Open House. The event highlighted the Fisher’s acquisitions from the past year, both purchases and those received via donation. Approximately 35 items, all selected and captioned by Fisher staff, were on display. The materials spanned the centuries – from the William Caxton-translated Golden Legend, published in England in 1507, through to recently published fine press books – and included books, photographs, manuscripts and other archival material. The open house was meant to demonstrate the breadth and depth of the Fisher’s collections. The library plans to hold another open house next year.

TCard services for students moving to Koffler Centre in January

Beginning January 2, TCard Services for students will be permanently located on the first floor of the Koffler Student Services Centre (214 College Street), in what will be the newly-renovated area that houses the Academic Success Centre, Career Centre and Housing Services. TCard services for staff and faculty be provided at the Reader Registration desk at Robarts Library. 

The physical move of the TCard Office from Robarts Library to the Koffler Centre will take place on December 19.
A TCard kiosk will operate on the second floor of Robarts Library on December 19 and 20.  

Faculty and staff who have questions about TCard Services are encouraged to contact Arlene Clement, Director, Housing & TCard Services, at arlene.clement.utoronto.ca, or Ursula Shail, Manager of TCard Services, at ursula.shail@utoronto.ca.

Week of November 14 - 18, 2016

Chinese university administrators visit UTL 

Contributed by Jack Leong

University of Toronto Libraries welcomed 22 senior university administrators from China who were attending an education workshop at OISE on November 9. The delegates surveyed the facilities and services at Robarts Library and toured the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library and the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library. In addition to our comprehensive, unique and special resources, they were very impressed with our efficient online and inter-library loan services.


Fisher Library condensation control project

Renovation of the existing exterior cladding system at the Thomas Fisher Library will begin this week, for expected completion at the end of March. These critical repairs will stop the condensation, leaks and water seepage in the building, protecting its unique and valuable collections which include some of Canada’s greatest cultural and historical treasures.

The work will involve over-cladding of the existing cast-in-place concrete walls with insulation and new pre-cast concrete panels to improve the thermal performance of the exterior. Once complete, the new over-cladding will match the existing look of the building.

Entrance to the Fisher Library during the project

During construction, entrance to the Fisher Library will be through either the east or west staircase at various times during the project. Signage will be posted and communications will go out regarding these changes as they occur. The main floor entrance will be accessible at all times.

On Wednesday, September 16, hoarding will go up on the southeast side of the building, including the southeast exterior staircase (facing St. George Street). The hoarding will make the southeast emergency exits from the 2nd floor of Robarts Library temporarily unavailable. Signage will be placed to alert library users to this temporary restriction.

Progress updates

Updates will go out as the project progresses. We thank everyone for your patience while we complete this essential work to protect the irreplaceable collections housed at the Fisher Library.

Questions? Please contact Glen Morales, Business Manager, Finance & Administration, 416-946-7035 | g.morales@utoronto.ca


Help shape the new staff intranet

Contributed by Lisa Gayhart

In collaboration with staff across the library system, ITS is developing a new staff intranet. The new intranet will provide a central place for UTL's official documents and internal services, continue to support central library workflows and selected system-wide workflows, and provide readily accessible communication and collaboration tools for staff system wide. Learn more about the project.

Get involved

We are building the intranet based on your needs: how you want to interact with it on a regular basis, the types of content included, and how to manage the intranet as it grows. 

In-person workshops

We'll talk about your current use of the staff intranet, gain an understanding of your needs in a staff intranet, and brainstorm solutions for the future.

UTM - November 18

Robarts Library – November 23

Gerstein Library – November 30

UTSC - TBD

Survey

A feedback survey is open now! Please take a couple minutes to provide your input on the current and future intranet.

Contact

Please contact the project team for more information: intranet@library.utoronto.ca

Week of October 31 - November 4, 2016

Help Us Build A New Staff Intranet

Contributed by Lisa Gayhart

In collaboration with staff across the library system, ITS is developing a new staff intranet. The new intranet will provide a central place for UTL's official documents and internal services, continue to support central library workflows and selected system-wide workflows, and provide readily accessible communication and collaboration tools for staff system wide.

Survey - open now

To help us understand how you use the current intranet, and what you would like in the new version, please take our short survey. It's anonymous, and will take less than 10 minutes to complete. Open until November 14.

In person workshops - coming soon

We are planning in person workshops on all three campuses to raise awareness about the project, and speak to you and learn what you need in a new intranet. Dates will be circulated to your campus group shortly.

Learn more

To learn more about the project, including how you can get involved, visit our project area in Confluence (no log in required). 

Food for fines in stylized print

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Food for Fines 2016

From November 21–25 we will waive $2 of library fines in exchange for a non-perishable food item (maximum $20 waived). Even those without fines can donate!  

Most needed items include: baby food, canned fruits, canned fish, plain beans (no sauce), canned vegetables, juice boxes salad dressings and condiments.

The following libraries will waive fines for participating libraries and will collect food:

  • Criminology Library
  • Engineering and Computer Science Library
  • Gerstein Science Information Centre
  • Graham Library, Trinity College
  • Inforum
  • Law Library
  • Music Library
  • OISE Library
  • Robarts Library
  • UTM Library
  • UTSC Library

The U of T Food and Clothing Bank operates year round and is open to all University of Toronto students. Students can register for the service by bringing in a print-out of their current timetable from ROSI and their TCard. The Food and Clothing Bank is open on Fridays between 12–3 pm at the U of T Multi-Faith Centre, 569 Spadina (between Willcocks and College). http://uoft.me/familiesinneed

Fisher Library condensation control project

Renovation of the existing exterior cladding system at Thomas Fisher Library will take place beginning this fall, with expected completion at the end of March. This work will involve over-cladding of the existing cast-in-place concrete walls with new precast concrete panels to improve the thermal performance of the exterior. During construction, entrances into Fisher will be made accessible through either the east or west staircases during different times in the project.  The main floor entrance will be accessible at all times.

Questions? Please contact Glen Morales, Business Manager, Finance & Administration, 416-946-7035 | g.morales@utoronto.ca

Week of October 24 - 28, 2016

STAR Award winners

Contributed by Tim Neufeldt

The second annual Staff Team Appreciation and Recognition (STAR) Awards reception was held earlier this month. Ten teams were nominated for their outstanding work at the University of Toronto Libraries. The quality of the nominations was impressive and the committee had a very difficult job in selecting the finalists. Thank you to all the participants! This years’ winners are the UTSC Hackathon Team (Innovation Award category) and TSpace Team (Ongoing Excellence category). Pictures will be posted to the STAR website shortly.

 

Photos, left to right: Hackathon team (Matt Gertler, Bill Chau, Kim Pham; Missing: Stephanie Perpick, Cheryl Bain); T-Space team (Mariya Maistrovskaya, Courtney Bodi, Sean Xiao Zhao, Stephanie Orfano, Graham Stewart, Gordon Belray, Steve Marks, Steve Baroti; Missing: Leslie Barnes, Bobby Glushko, Christopher Crebolder, ​Teodora Naydenova, Lillian Rigling, Andy Wagner)

Week of October 17 - 21, 2016

Call for Nominations: 2016-17 Staff Team Appreciation and Recognition (STAR) Awards Committee

In 2014, Larry established the “Staff Team Appreciation and Recognition (STAR) Awards”.  These awards recognize the outstanding work of library staff, and are separate and complementary to the University’s “Excellence Through Innovation Award.”  These awards align with our strategic goals of:

  • Cultivating a positive, transparent and responsive organization able to deliver excellent services that communicate the value of the library and its many outstanding employees;
  • fostering a culture of innovation and experimentation, and encouraging staff to adopt an evidence-based practice;
  • embracing a diversity of ideas, languages and skills that will enhance our ability to deliver excellent services;  and
  • promoting continuous professional growth and learning at all staff levels.

We now have had two years’ of awards with some terrific nominations and winners. It is now time to establish a new committee who will put out a call for nominations for the 2016-17 awards and select new winners in the ‘Innovation’ and ‘Ongoing Excellence’ categories.

I hope that you will consider nominating yourself or a colleague to serve on this important committee, which will report to me.  Membership will be broadly representative, and members are asked to serve for a one year term.

If you wish to volunteer, please email Lesley Falkner (lesley.falkner@utoronto.ca) by Friday, November 18th. Please include in the subject line of the email the following:  Staff Team Appreciation and Recognition Committee. 

Thank you everyone,

Julie Hannaford

Deputy Chief Librarian

Chief Librarian’s Innovation Grants

Congratulations to our colleagues listed below, who are the recipients of the Chief Librarian's Innovation Grants. The grants listed have either been approved or tentatively approved. 

Serendipity and the Research Process: Leveraging Linked Data to Enable New Pathways for Resource Discovery

  • Marlene Van Ballegooie & Bilal Khalid

Web-Based E-Records Transfer Portal

  • Tys Klumpenhouwer, Emily Sommers, Steve Marks

Preserving the Music o' Canada: Acquisition and Digital Preservation of Our Recorded Heritage, Phase 1

  • Houman Behzadi & Steve Marks

Online open-access peer review search strategy tool

  • Heather Cunningham & Maria Buda

Family Study Space

  • Jesse Carliner, Ikee Gibson, Kyla Everall & Francesca Dobbin

University of Toronto Libraries Collaborative Usability Lab

  • Lisa Gayhart

Fisher Library Seminar: Introduction to Book Illustration

  • David Fernandez, Deborah Whiteman, P.J. Carefoote, Liz Ridolfo & Chris Young

The full student experience

  • Ikee Gibson

A simple solution to increased productivity

  • Ikee Gibson

Important safety information

Dear University of Toronto faculty, staff and students,

We have learned that specific threats have been made in social media against some individual members of the trans community at the University of Toronto.

We condemn these threats. We are working closely with University of Toronto Campus Police, Toronto Police Service, and the U of T Community Safety Office to support the individuals who have received these threats. The situation is being actively monitored.

The University of Toronto is proud of our diverse community and supports a safe environment for all of our members. As expressed in our Statement on Prohibited Discrimination and Discriminatory Harassment, we deplore the targeting of individuals and communities on the basis of gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, religion, race or any other ground of prohibited discrimination.

Cheryl Regehr

Vice-President & Provost

Kelly Hannah-Moffat

Vice-President, Human Resources & Equity

If you or anyone you know has safety concerns, please visit http://safety.utoronto.ca/ or contact:

Campus Police (Emergency Number)

St George and UTSC: 416-978-2222
UTM: 905-569-4333

Community Safety Office (Tri-campus)

416-978-1485

http://www.communitysafety.utoronto.ca

Additional Resources:

Sexual & Gender Diversity Office (Tri-campus)

416-946-5624

sgdo@utoronto.ca

http://sgdo.utoronto.ca/

Anti-Racism & Cultural Diversity Office (Tri-campus)

416-978-1259

antiracism@utoronto.ca

http://www.antiracism.utoronto.ca

UTM Equity & Diversity Office

905-569-4916

edo.utm@utoronto.ca

http://www.utm.utoronto.ca/edo

UTSC Equity & Diversity Office

416-208-2241
edo@utsc.utoronto.ca

http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/edo


UTL celebrates 150th anniversary of Dostoevsky novel

Contributed by Ksenya Kiebuzinski

The PJRC, together with the Department of Russian at the University of Bristol, the British Association of Slavonic and East European Studies 19th-century Study Group, the Cambridge University Library, and the Vancity Theatre (Vancouver), are taking part in a Connection Grant from the Social Science and Humanities Research council of Canada to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the publication of Fyodor M. Dostoevsky’s novel Crime and Punishment. The events, organized by Professors Katherine Bowers (UBC) and Kate Holland (U of T), are taking place online and on-site in various locations across Canada and the United Kingdom, with the UTL’s contribution being an exhibition at Robarts examining the novel’s influence across the globe. Visit the display on the 1st floor through 30 November 2016, or virtually at http://blogs.ubc.ca/cp150/.


CIRHR Library newsletter gets new look

Contributed by Vicki Skelton

We have recently updated the IR/HR Library’s weekly e-publication, PWR: work&labour news&research (formerly the Perry Work Report).  Below is an abbreviated copy of our newsletter which is free to academics, students, and non-profits. We have a new banner in honour of the Centre for Industrial Relations & Human Resources' 50thanniversary, and a new distribution system using MailChimp, also used by the University of Toronto Bulletin & News. This publication is based upon our social media accounts — our Twitter account and our tumblr: work&labour news&research.

We have a mailing list of over 1,000 alumni, practitioners, academics and academic organizations such as the Canadian Industrial Relations Association. We received a request this month from Johanna Weststar, Associate Professor, Dept. of Management & Organizational Studies at Western University, for permission to forward the PWR:work&labour news&research to  3000 business students.  We are also distributed by Lancaster House (legal publisher) via its Collective Bargaining newsletter. If anyone in the University of Toronto community wishes to subscribe please send us an email at: cirhr.library@utoronto.ca.  The sample below does not include the content, just the titles – please contact us if you want to read more!


 

 

 

 

 

View this email in your browser


Announcements:

We are launching the 15th year of the Perry Work Report with a new banner and logo celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Centre and the 40th anniversary of the MIRHR Program.
 
For years, PWR has been an affectionate nickname for the Perry Work Report, named after founding editor Elizabeth Perry, 2002 – 2006.  Vicki Skelton, CIRHR Librarian, has been the editor since January 2007, joined by two exceptional Faculty of Information students, Melissa Wawrzkiewicz (2012 – 2015) and Caitlin MacLeod (2015 – current).  In these recent years we have developed our online presence on tumblr as work&labour news&research, and on the CIRHR Library Twitter accountWe are now in the process of upgrading our tumblr and making it more accessible as a database of current IR/HR news and research. We will keep you posted.
 
With a new updated name that reflects our online presence the PWR: work&labour news&research will continue to keep students, alumni, academics and practitioners up-to-date with research and news in industrial relations and human resource management locally and globally.

Best from your editors: Vicki Skelton & Caitlin MacLeod


PWR: work&labour news&research

Nip and tuck: circulation desk gets a lift to serve you better

Contributed by Sheril Hook

The Kelly Library's new height-adjustable circulation desk is not only stylish but is accessible to library patrons and staff alike. Don't believe us? Watch a video of the desk in action here.


UTL collaborates with the Toronto Public Library to Offer MAP passes to students

The Toronto Public Library is expanding its popular MAP program to include U of T and Ryerson students who are 18 and over.

The program is a partnership between the Toronto Public Library, the University of Toronto and Ryerson University, and is sponsored by Sun Life Financial. Passes were donated to the program by the Art Gallery of Ontario, Bata Shoe Museum, City of Toronto Historic Sites and the Textile Museum of Canada.

Students can request a MAP booklet at the OISE, Engineering & Computer Science, Gerstein, UTSC, UTM and Robarts libraries and take it into one of five participating TPL branches to ‘sign out’ their MAP pass to one of the four venues. Each Student MAP pass, which can be used until April 30, is good for two people. The booklets will be handed out at the participating U of T libraries from October 18 to January 31 or until they run out.

We are excited to be participating in this pilot project, which will allow students to explore the diverse cultural landscape of our city for free.

Week of October 3 - 7, 2016

U of T Libraries in action: Annual Report 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 2016 Annual Report is now online, featuring a dynamic illustration of Robarts Library by illustrator, Jason Loo.

Innovation and collaboration are behind our efforts to put our Strategic Plan 2013-2018 (updated) priorities into action this past year. What have we all been up to? Some highlights are:

  • The Gerstein Science Information Centre has introduced a new Research and Innovation Service, which will improve our ability to deliver services, while fully aligning library activities with other research and innovation functions across the University.
  • Music librarians Suzanne Meyers Sawa, James Mason and Houman Behzadi discovered a long-lost violin concerto by Norwegian composer, Johan Halvorsen, inside the papers of Canadian violinist, Kathleen Parlow.
  • UTL has made strides to empower student scholars by launching an array of new services and programs tailored to their unique needs, including opportunities for funding and the implementation of the iStaff team, who assist their peers as they navigate Robarts.
  • Linked data is expected to cause a seismic shift in libraries as dramatic as the conversion from the card catalogue to the MARC record. UTL is partnering with various other universities and the Canadian Linked Data Initiative in order to implement linked open data and adapt to changes in metadata standards.

A limited number of print copies are available in the Library Administration office. Contact Communications Librarian, Jesse Carliner, to request copies. 

Help stop campus theft

According to the Campus Community Police: 

“Theft is the number one reported crime on campus and an increasingly high percentage of theft is involving property left unattended and in a public space. Thieves walk our buildings carefully waiting for unsuspecting and unassuming individuals to leave their laptops unattended while they quickly step aside to use the washroom or grab some lunch. Then, in seconds, the thief moves in and your laptop is history.” 

Students may not realize how quickly a theft can occur in our busy downtown location. Please help raise awareness of the importance of never leaving valuables unattended in the libraries or other buildings on campus, even for a moment.

Download posters, tabletop tent cards and web graphics for use in your library.

Week of September 26 - 30, 2016

U of T Libraries welcomes new and returning TALint students

Contributed by Lindsay Harker

On September 22, a reception was held to welcome new and returning participants in the Toronto Academic Libraries Internship, or TALint program. Wendy Duff, Dean of the iSchool, Larry Alford, Chief Librarian and Julie Hannaford, Deputy Chief Librarian, gave remarks at the reception.

The TALint program provides “interns the opportunity to not only enhance the quality of their learning, but also strengthen the profession by creating future leaders who will meet the complexities inherent in the libraries, archives and records management fields”, according to Duff.

The event was attended by TALint supervisors and students, members of the UTL and iSchool administrations. It was a night full of pleasant conversation and networking.

Pilot project aims to reduce cigarette butt litter outside of Robarts Library

Beginning this week, the security team at Robarts Library will be equipped with a stock of pocket ashtrays for distribution to people smoking on library grounds. We hope this pilot initiative, which originated from a staff proposal, will help to reduce cigarette butt litter in the vicinity of the building. 

Professor of Information Science from Brazilian university visits UTL

Contributed by Jack Leong

The Libraries hosted a visit from Lígia Maria Moreira Dumont, full professor at the School of Information Science (Escola de Ciência da Informação - ECI), Federal University of Minas Gerais, on September 2. Professor Dumont was impressed with our collections and facilities, which she visited during a tour of Robarts Library and the Fisher Library. Professor Dumont also met with Professor Wendy Duff, Dean of the iSchool, during her time with us and had a preview of the Inforum, the newly renovated facility for students at the Faculty of Information.

Week of September 12 - 16, 2016

Fisher manuscript takes on new significance with discovery of H.M.S. Terror

Avast! Did ye hear the news? The H.M.S. Terror has been discovered in Nunavut’s aptly-named Terror Bay! The doomed expedition of Sir John Franklin, including the Terror and Erebus, was abandoned 168 years ago, and the vessels have been locked in the ice ever since. According to John Geiger: "After the discovery of HMS Erebus two years ago, the Terror remained the largest missing piece of the puzzle. Together, these discoveries have the potential to alter forever our understanding of the Franklin expedition's disastrous end.” (CBC)

If you want to learn more, the Fisher Library has you covered with Owen Stanley's Journal of a Voyage for the Discovery of the Northwest Passage in H. M. S. Terror from 1836. Stanley’s beautiful drawings will transport you back to the days when the Terror lived up to its name, just a few short years before its last fateful voyage. 

 

 

Photo credit: fisherlibrary

Week of September 5 - 9, 2016

UTL Strategic Plan 2016 Update

Charting our Future is now updated and ready for your review. Sian and Julie would like to thank the committee who worked on the five pillars to refresh the language, ensuring that our plan is current and reflects our direction. We also would like to particularly thank Laura for her leadership through the process and Maureen for working her usual magic on the design. We hope that you all enjoy reading it. Please let us know if you have any feedback – it is most welcome.

 

No cash payments at Robarts Library service desks as of September 1 

Effective Thursday, September 1, 2016, all Robarts Library service desks are cashless locations, with the exception of the Reader Registration desk. Amex, MasterCard, VISA and debit cards will be accepted at service desks which process financial transactions.

The cash-to-card machines on the first and second floors will continue to accept cash.

New Ask Us Service at Robarts Library

Starting today, a new Robarts Library initiative will be launched: the Ask Us service. It will be mobile and based on the 2nd floor of Robarts Library. All services currently offered at the 4th floor Reference Desk will be provided by Ask Us staff on the 2nd floor. Phone help for users will continue as usual. The Ask Us service will have the same hours as the 4th floor service this past academic year and maintain the same level of service and staffing. As an extension of the same service system as the iStaff, all Ask Us staff will wear the blue “I” vest during desk shifts. The Robarts Reference service philosophy remains the same: high quality, on the spot user support.
 
We are launching this new service in response to demonstrated user needs, including knowledge gained from the first year of the iStaff program and in anticipation of a change in the flow of traffic through the building, when we open the Robarts Common.
 
We welcome your thoughts on this exciting new initiative. Please contact Debbie Green or Lari Langford.

Week of August 22 - 26, 2016

Audio Tour of Reading Revolution Exhibition Now Available

An audio guide of the Fisher Library's current exhibition, Reading Revolution: Art and Literacy During China's Cultural Revolution, narrated by the curators is now available for download or streaming on both SoundCloud and iTunes.

Lead curator Jenny Purtle, with assistance from co-curator Liz Ridolfo, takes us through the exhibition case by case, exploring the posters in each case along with highlighting some favourite items in the cases.

The exhibition uses the 50th anniversary of the Cultural Revolution to explore the importance of reading during this period, examining how propaganda posters and other artifacts of the Cultural Revolution represented the writings of Chairman Mao, how these posters and artifacts popularized a culture of Mao’s books, and how, in turn, text-heavy propaganda posters, artifacts representing books, and the large-scale printing of books of Mao Zedong Thought (Mao Zedong sixiang) created a context for increased literacy.

The audio tour can be streamed or downloaded from the Fisher's SoundCloud site (click on link to access the playlist) or from the Fisher's iTunes channel. There is also a video on YouTube, narrated by Purtle, which looks at the broader themes of the exhibition.

The exhibition continues until September 30. Watch this space for a special curator-led tour for UTL staff in September.

Week of August 15 - 19, 2016

University of Toronto Libraries in top 5 in latest ARL rankings

The University of Toronto Libraries are again in the top 5 in the recently released Association of Research Libraries (ARL) annual Library Investment Index, commonly referred to as the annual ranking. This year the Libraries were ranked 4th, falling from 3rd place in the previous year.  This drop in ranking is a result of the decline in the value of the Canadian dollar and was not unexpected.  ARL determines rank by converting the libraries’ expenditures to US dollars based on the average exchange rate over the year. This in no way reflects negatively on the support the libraries receives from the University of Toronto in comparison to the other ARL top 10 libraries or on the work of library staff whose continued dedication and excellence make this a world class library system. In particular, it is thanks to the astute work of the Collection Development department that even with the weak Canadian dollar, they ensured that the Libraries would acquire the resources that are critical to research and discovery. The Libraries remain well positioned in the rankings with only Harvard, Yale, and now Columbia ahead of us. 

 

Cycling for Libraries visits UTL

On August 10, 2016, University of Toronto Libraries welcomed participants of Cycling for Libraries, an international cycling conference for librarians and library lovers. It was started in Europe in 2011 to advocate for libraries and increase awareness of the value of library services and resources. UTL was the last stop of the group’s 2016 seven day tour in Ontario, Canada. The group had a guided tour of Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, enjoyed refreshments and networked with UTL librarians and staff, and toured around Robarts Library. The cycling librarians were impressed by UTL’s extensive collection and the technologies available for students and researchers.

 

 

Fisher Library's Brutalist architecture featured in award-winning short film

Architect Emily Cheng's short film Mass Times Acceleration (97 seconds, 2015) features the stunning Brutalist architecture of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, part of the Robarts Library complex of three Brutalist buildings. The film takes a unique inverted perspective on the Fisher Library, reminiscent of the approach to the Death Star in Star Wars VI. Ms. Cheng offers a fresh look at an iconic University of Toronto building, that she describes as "aesthetically risky and initially hated" but that "decades later the building has evolved into a celebrated icon of Brutalist style." 

The short has been screened in Canada and Australia and has been well received, winning the Audience Choice Award at the 2015 Australian National Architecture Conference in Melbourne and Honorable Mention at the ArchiShorts 2016 Short Film Competition in Winnipeg. 

View and learn more about the film 

Lost concerto continues to find new adventures

What an adventure! What began with the chance discovery of a long thought lost violin concerto by the Norwegian composer Johan Halvorsen, followed by a chance meeting at a reception in New York City with the Norwegian president of the International Musicological Society (IMS), came to a happy conclusion when a trio of music librarians, Houman Behzadi, James Mason, and Suzanne Meyers Sawa attended the IMS annual conference in July in Stavanger, Norway, held at the Department of Music and Dance of the University of Stavanger. The conference, "Music as Art, Artefact and Fact: Music Research in the 21st Century," featured two events on July 4 related to the Halvorsen concerto.  The first, a panel dedicated to the concerto, and moderated by Suzanne, featured three papers related to Kathleen Parlow (1890-1963), the Canadian violinist to whom the concerto had been dedicated, and who gave it four known performances, in Holland and Norway in 1909 and 1910.  James described the discovery of the concerto, and the technical aspects of organizing the digitization of the Kathleen Parlow archival collection.  Houman's paper featured the physical preservation measures used in preparation for long-term care of the archive. 

Suzanne read a paper by the long-time Parlow scholar Andrew Homzy, Professor Emeritus from Concordia, on Parlow's first recording session for Gramophone, in the summer of 1909. The three also curated an exhibition at the Stavanger Concert House devoted to Parlow's relations with Norway, which complimented the performance of the concerto that featured the Norwegian soloist Henning Kraggerud. This second event on July 4, truly the highlight of the conference,  included a presentation of a fine facsimile edition of the Music Library copy of the concerto score, made by UTL colleagues Maureen Morin and Linda Joy. 

Top photo: Violinist Henning Kraggerud discussing performance practice issues related to the publication of the concerto's critical edition

Bottom photo: Members of the Halvorsen-Parlow panel along with Dean Don McLean showcasing the facsimile of the concerto

Week of August 8 - 12, 2016

New Scan & Deliver Service: Faculty, staff, and grad students can request print journal articles

Gerstein, Robarts and UTM have launched a “Scan & Deliver” pilot. U of T faculty, staff, and graduate students may request articles from print journals at these libraries to be scanned and delivered to their desktops via email.  
 
To submit a request
  • Locate the journal title in the library catalogue and click “Options” then “Request.” 
  • For items in the periodical stacks at Gerstein, Robarts, or UTM, the option "Request Scan & Deliver (PILOT for Faculty, Staff, Graduate Students only)” will appear. Click  this option, then click “Continue.”
  • Log in with your UTORid and password.
  • Provide the citation information including volume, issue, and page numbers. 
Once submitted, our staff will locate the item and, if it’s available, scan and email to you. You will receive an email confirmation. If an item is already available electronically, our staff will direct you to the link to access it.
 
We welcome any comments or questions about this service. Please contact elena.springall@utoronto.ca (Gerstein),  susan.stone@utoronto.ca (Robarts), or alison.campbell.a@utoronto.ca (UTM).

Week of August 1 - 5, 2016

Engineering and Computer Science Library Reopens After Renovations

The Engineering & Computer Science Library (ECSL) recently reopened after renovations to increase and improve student study spaces.

During the academic year the ECSL is  bustling with engineering students and study space can be in high demand. Taking advantage of University of Toronto Libraries’ Downsview long term storage facility, ECSL transferred some of its lesser used materials to  allow for the addition of 58 light and airy new study carrels and easier access to relevant reference materials (standards, handbooks and dictionaries).

“Study space is at a real premium” explains Acting ECSL Head Cristina Sewerin, “and engineering students often bring their own devices to the library, but haven’t had the

 space to use them or the means to power or recharge them.” Students can now take advantage of individual task lighting, and recharge phones and laptops using the handy electrical and USB outlets at each carrel. 

As well, students can relax and refresh between classes on some of our innovative new lounge chairs. The improvements pay homage to this beautiful architectural space in Sandford Fleming Building and reveal the inset wood shelving and paneling of the reference semi-rotunda. 

ECSL staff would also like to take this opportunity to thank Cris Sewerin for her vision and tireless effort to make this wonderful renovation happen! Cris, congratulations on creating an open, updated, clean and beautiful space for our patrons. We know this wouldn’t have been possible without you!

UTL welcomes international visitors from Taiwan and Beijing

On July 18. Mr. Alvin Cheng from the National Taiwan University visited Robarts, Fisher, the Data Centre in ITS and the East Asian Library. His visit deepened the collaboration between UTL and NTU library established in May this year with Larry Alford’s visit to Taiwan. On July 26, Vice President of Beijing Foreign Studies University Professor Jia Dezhong, Professor Liu Chen, Professor Geng Liping and two students from their university participating in UofT’s exchange program met with Chief Librarian Larry Alford and colleagues. This visit facilitated the gift-and-exchange between the East Asian Library and BFS University Press, one of the largest publication houses in China.

Scholars Portal Service Update: Accessible Content ePortal (ACE)

This week, the Accessible Content ePortal (ACE) service passed a major milestone.  With the support of their digitization partner, Internet Archive Canada, as well as our 18 participating universities and 22 colleges, they have grown their collection of accessible books for Ontario academic library users with print disabilities to over 10,000 titles. 
 
ACE supports the research needs of verified students and faculty with print disabilities.  The service began as an OCUL pilot project in 2013, and became a core Scholars Portal service the following year.  ACE service was extended to the Ontario Colleges Library Service (OCLS) in 2015.  This initiative has enabled participating institutions to meet their Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) obligations by facilitating and coordinating user requests for accessible formats of library holdings. Offering access to a centralized and standardized production centre via Internet Archive Canada, participating schools are able to access quality digitized materials in five accessible formats.
 
Eliminating the duplication of labour and offering participants a way to retain digitized material, this repository has empowered its users with the immediacy of access to thousands of accessible texts, fostering the process of serendipitous discovery and learning. By building a shared repository, OCUL has enabled each participant to also access materials which were not requested by their institution, but which are found in the local library holdings. The opportunity to continue making library collections accessible by anticipating requests for these materials demonstrates future-forward interest in sustainability and progress towards removing barriers to access for Ontario students and researchers.  
 
For more information, please see the ACE LibGuide
For questions or comments, please contact Sabina Pagotto

The East Asian Library's July 2016 Newsletter is now available

The Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library is pleased to release the latest issue of The EAL Newsletter.

In the current issue, you will find:
o   Partnership with the North American Taiwan Studies Association: The 22nd NATSA Annual Conference
o   Celebrate Asian Heritage 2016
o   NK News and NK Pro: Specialized Sites Offering DPRK News and Analysis, Research Tools and Unique Data Sets
o   Notable Acquisitions
o   Internet Resources Highlights
 
Past issues of the newsletter are accessible online, and the library also makes print copies of the current issue available at the EAL reference desk.

St George TCard Office Moving January 2, 2017

The TCard Office (for students) will be moving to the Koffler Student Services Centre as of January 2, 2017.  Until that time, students will continue to obtain their TCard from the Robarts Library location.
 
Faculty and staff will continue to be issued TCards at the Library Reader Registration Service Desk on the ground floor at Robarts Library, as well as at the TCard Office.
 
Please direct all questions to Ursula Shail, Manager of the TCard Office, (416) 946 8203

Food Services Transition

Aramark’s contract with the University ended on July 31, and the University began its self-op on August 1. Food service resumes on Tuesday with new food offerings, and the intent is to provide full service during the month of August. As they transition, your patience is appreciated.

Reminder to Beware of Phishing and Other Suspicious Emails

ITS would like to remind library staff to practice vigilance when encountering unfamiliar or suspicious emails. Phishing attacks and other forms of email fraud often present themselves as support messages prompting users to click on a link or enter a password to retain access to mail or other technical services. These messages are intended to manipulate users into downloading malware or providing their credentials to malicious organizations.
 
UofT and other legitimate organizations will never send requests for passwords or other personal information via email. If you receive a message requesting your user name or password to any accounts, do not provide it. If the message provides a link to a website, do not click on it. Instead, you should delete these messages.
 
For more information on identifying and avoiding email fraud, see the Information Commons Help Desk article here.
 
If you require help identifying a message as fraudulent, or if you have any other questions or concerns regarding email fraud, please feel welcome to contact us at itshelp@library.utoronto.ca.
 
Thank you and Regards,
Information Technology Services

Week of July 25 - 29, 2016

Research data management practices: a Canadian view

Anticipated changes to Tri-Agency (NSERC, SSHRC and CIHR) funding policies regarding research data management (RDM) have been prompting librarians at Canadian academic institutions to better understand faculty and researchers’ practices and attitudes surrounding RDM.  A survey of sciences and engineering faculty and researchers recently completed at five Canadian universities, including U of T, is helping to provide insight into these current practices and attitudes.    The information gathered could be used to determine what library and institutional support the faculty and researchers might require if changes to the funding policies were made.  The survey was created at U of T by librarians Cristina Sewerin, Dylanne Dearborn, Angela Henshilwood, Michelle Spence and Tracy Zahradnik, and so far has been implemented at U of T, Queen’s University, University of Alberta, University of British Columbia and University of Waterloo. Results from these five schools were recently presented at a couple of conferences:
 
  • paper presented at IATUL 2016 Conference in Halifax
  • poster presented at IASSIST 2016 Conference in Bergen
 
A report on the U of T results is also available.
 
Some highlights* from the multi-school results:
  • In this paper & poster, 780 responses from the five universities are included: Queen’s (400); U of A (128); U of T (95); UBC (94); and Waterloo (63).
  • Long tail of data - 46.0% of the respondents indicated they needed <50 GB per project. On the other end of storage spectrum, 1.9% used over 500TB per project
  • Both text and numerical data count - 63.8% indicated that they used or generated numerical data (e.g. CSV, MAT, XLS, SPSS), while 60.9% indicated they used or generated text (e.g. TXT, DOC, PDF, RTF, HTML, XML), which quite interesting since we have surveyed science and engineering disciplines only at this stage.
  • Privacy issues - When asked where they store their research data from their current projects, 60.9% of the respondents stated they used a computer hard drive (i.e. local hard drive). Encouragingly, 59.6% indicated that they used an external data repository (e.g. Protein Data Bank, Cambridge Structural Database, GitHub, Dryad, Figshare), indicating that at least some researchers are already using data repositories.
  • Compute Canada infrastructure - Surprisingly, only 6.5% used a grid/high performance computing (HPC) centre for their storage needs
  • Metadata needs - When asked if there was sufficient documentation and description for their data, only 38.5% of the respondents said "yes", while 61.5% responded "no" or "not sure," indicating that this may be an area that researchers require guidance or assistance.
  • Sharing data - Interestingly, when asked with whom they would be willing to share data with, only 3.5% of the respondents responded “nobody”.
  • When asked about the benefits they saw to sharing their data, only 11.4% of the respondents indicated they saw no benefit.
  • DMPs Help - Of the 358 respondents who identified at least one of the Tri-Agencies (CIHR, SSHRC, NSERC) as a funding source, 82.9% said they would need or want assistance with drafting a data management plan as part of a grant application.
  • The services that respondents wanted the most included: 72.1% showed a level of interest in personalized consultation on data management practices for specific research groups or projects; 79.5% showed a level of interest in communication and information about funding requirements and journal requirements regarding research data; and 73.5% showed a level of interest in data storage and backup during active research projects.
  • We also found that Data security may be an issue for some researchers, as noted by the percentage of researchers indicating they use flash or USB drives and laptop computers to store data
  • The most common method of ​data ​sharing that respondents currently use is to share by personal request only    
 
Four additional institutions - University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Dalhousie University, University of Ottawa, and McGill University - expect to run their survey iterations for science and engineering researchers later this year. The nine institutions are also currently adapting the survey instrument to use on their respective health and medical sciences populations as well as social science and humanities researcher populations.
 
*with thanks to Eugene Barsky of UBC for compiling these highlights.

U of T Archives launches YouTube Channel

The University of Toronto Archives and Records Management Services has launched a YouTube channel to feature and promote audiovisual material on U of T and Canadian history.

The channel currently features 19 videos, including the 1939 Royal Visit to Hart House, Varsity Life (a U of T promotional film, circa 1923), the construction of Robarts Library, and interviews with Margaret Avison, Robertson Davies, and Hugh MacLennan. The channel also includes a 1968 video of René Lévesque speaking with students at Scarborough College, as part of the French Canada Today series. Digitization of this material will help expand its use and research value to a wider audience, as well as help preserve the original film and tape by reducing our need to access them. Read more on the UTARMS wesite. 

UTL launches Undergraduate Research Prize

 
This year, the University of Toronto Libraries launched the Undergraduate Research Prize. This prize was created to provide students with an opportunity to reflect on their information-seeking experience, showcase their research to an audience beyond the classroom, and promote scholarship excellence at the undergraduate level at the University of Toronto.
 
In its first year, 50 submissions were received from across all three campuses, and from various faculties. A reviewing panel composed of faculty and librarians deliberated over the entries to award six students and two honourable mentions with this year’s prize.
 
In addition to challenging students to reflect upon their information-seeking behaviour for a class assignment, the UTL Undergraduate Research Prize also allowed faculty reviewers to get a glimpse of students’ work beyond their own disciplines. One faculty reviewer, Professor David Roberts in the Urban Studies Program at Innis College, notes: “Reading through the applications and supporting documents has inspired me to reconsider the ways in which I support my undergraduates in their research and has exposed me to even more of the amazing supports available through our library system than the ones I was already familiar with.”
 
The winning students’ entries, including reflective essays and original assignments, will be uploaded into the institutional repository over the summer, so watch TSpace!
 
 
 
 
 L-R: Vivian Ying Szeto, 3rd place winner in Year 3 / 4 category, Sami Semmar, 2nd place winner in Year 1 / 2 category, Sami Ul Haq, 3rd place winner in Year 1 /2 category (Photo credit Nelly Cancilla)

Week of July 4 - 8, 2016

In the Loop on two week hiatus

The In the Loop weekly newsletter will be taking a break for the next two weeks. Look out for a super edition on July 26th! 

ARL Library Liaison Institute article ranks as third most read on C&RL News 2016

An article co-authored by Rita Vine on the partnership efforts of U of T, Cornell, Columbia, and the Association of Research Libraries is the third most read article on the College and Research Libraries News site so far in 2016. The article is entitled ARL Library Liaison Institute: What we learned about needs and opportunities for reskilling and explores information collected at the day-and-half institute about what liaisons value in their work, and how they see their jobs changing as a result of new research practices.

UTL's Dragon Boat team wins gold

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
For the second year running, UTL’s dragon boat team, the Library of Conquest, participated on July 1st in the DDRA Canada Day Regatta at Toronto’s Centre Island. The team braved the day’s fast-changing weather and occasional downpour to complete two races in the morning, and after a close and hard-fought race, the crew emerged victorious, winning a gold medal for their division.  Click here for the full story.

Week of June 27 - July 1, 2016

Centre for Industrial Relations and Human Resources celebrates 50th Anniversary

On June 17, 2016, the Centre for Industrial Relations and Human Resources  celebrated the Centre’s 50th anniversary, alongside the 40th anniversary of the Masters of Industrial Relations & Human Resources program (MIRHR). This was also the 30th anniversary of the PhD and the Employment Relations undergraduate program (Woodsworth College). Over 120 alumni, former faculty and friends came together for a mixture of insight, fun and emotion. Several videos were created for The Face of Work: A Peoples' History of CIRHR, 1965 -- 2015, part of the CIRHR's 50th Anniversary Celebration.
 
The videos features CIRHR photographs, alongside publications and other documents depicting the history of work and labour, dating from the era of one of the CIRHR's six directors: John Crispo (1965-1975), Noah Meltz (1975-1985), Morley Gunderson (1985-1997), Frank Reid (1997-2009), Anil Verma (2009-2015) and Rafael Gomez (2015- ).
 
The final video covers the history of the CIRHR from 1965 to the present, presenting an overview of the six directors' eras, A Peoples' History of CIRHR, 1965 -- 2015 (3:16 min), by Monica Hypher, Library Technician.
 

Engineering & Computer Science Library now reopening July 18

The improvements to study spaces at the Engineering & Computer Science Library are going well. There have been some small delays with a few items, and the reopening date has therefore been moved back two weeks to Monday July 18.
 
Library staff are doing their best to minimize disruption and inconvenience to our users, however, some ECSL services continue to be suspended during this period. Details are available here.
  
We are very excited about the benefits to our students and we look forward to showing off the improved space! Stay tuned. In the meantime, please don’t hesitate to get in touch if you have any questions. We thank you for your patience while we make these improvements!

 

Fisher Rare Book Library Elevator Modernization

On Saturday June 25 a crane lift was conducted off of Harbord Avenue to facilitate work on modernizing the elevator in the rare book library. 

 

Student2Scholar now part of ACRL's PRIMO Database

Having met the selection criteria, Student2Scholar, a collaborative project from Queen's, Western, and U of T, has been accepted to the ACRL's PRIMO (Peer-Reviewed Instructional Materials Online) Database. 

Student2Scholar was launched in the fall of 2015, and is a series of 10 self-paced, interactive, openly-available online modules designed for graduate students in the social sciences. Modules help students develop their critical thinking, organization, research, and communication skills, enabling them to participate more actively and confidently in their communities of research. The learning experience is intended to be flexible: students may complete the entire series or most relevant modules and activities at point of need.

 

Week of June 20 - 24, 2016

Anne Dondertman celebrates her retirement with Fisher Fête 

A large crowd of donors, friends and supporters (we could not have fit any more people in the room if we tried) came to the Fisher Library on June 14th to say farewell to Anne Dondertman, Director of the Fisher Library and Associate Chief Librarian of Special Collections, who retires on June 30. Michael Walsh, Chair of the Fisher Steering Committee and one of our most generous donors, expressed great pride about his strong relationship with Anne and his association with the Fisher. He spoke eloquently about the importance of Anne’s legacy and her profound impact on the success of the Libraries. (He also made sure to mention Anne’s passion for gardening and vintage beer labels.) It was a wonderful evening for everyone, and Anne very graciously posed for many, many photos.  What a perfect way to send off one of our most admired and respected library leaders.

Week of June 13 - 17, 2016

UTL team participates in Orbis Plane Pull for Sight

On Sunday, June 12, for the second year running, the University of Toronto Libraries fielded a team to participate in the 2016 Orbis Plane Pull for Sight.  Led by Dr. Jack Leong, director of the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library, the team members combined their strength to pull a Boeing 757 cargo plane and raise money for Orbis, an organization dedicated to training eye doctors and restoring vision worldwide.

 
We wish to thank everyone who came out to participate in the plane pull, as well as those who supported us with donations.  A special mention goes to Hon. Dr. Vivienne Poy, whose substantial contribution helped us raise $2,417.  Thank you!
 
 

University Archivist wins national and provincial awards

Loryl MacDonald, U of T’s University Archivist, was honoured with two prestigious awards this conference season, recognizing her incredible contributions to the archival community, both at the provincial and federal levels.

On May 13th, Loryl was awarded the Alexander Fraser Award by the Archives Association of Ontario (AAO). The Fraser award is given to individuals who have contributed in a significant way to the advancement of the archival community in Ontario.

Then, on June 3rd, Loryl won the Member Recognition Award from the Association of Canadian Archivists (ACA), the profession’s national association. This award honours ACA members who have made and continue to make significant contribution to the association and the development of the archival profession, and to recognize, celebrate and encourage the professional achievements, contributions and excellence of ACA members in the field of archival practice. 

[Read more]

Week of June 6 - 10, 2016

U of T Provost Cheryl Regehr named to Board of Directors of Center for Research Libraries

Our Provost and Vice-President Cheryl Regehr was recently named to the Board of Directors for the Center for Research Libraries (CRL).  The Center for Research Libraries (CRL) is an international consortium of university, college, and independent research libraries. Founded in 1949, CRL supports original research and inspired teaching in the humanities, sciences, and social sciences by preserving and making available to scholars a wealth of rare and uncommon primary source materials from all world regions. CRL is based in Chicago, Illinois, and is governed by a Board of Directors drawn from the library, research and higher education communities.

We are very pleased that Cheryl will be contributing her valuable expertise as a scholar and administrator to CRL.

 
 

Week of May 30 - June 3

The Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library opens its doors for Doors Open Toronto

The Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library participated in Doors Open once again this year, on Saturday May 28th. More than 1650 visitors came to see the gorgeous library and highlights from the Rare Books and University Archives’ collections, including this month’s display case on the planning, construction, and early days of the building. Visitors also had the opportunity to view the exhibit “‘So long lives this’: A Celebration of Shakespeare’s Life and Works” on its closing day. One couple was overheard remarking that it was “the best Doors Open event” they had ever attended.
 
Staff also displayed material related to this year’s Doors Open theme: "Re-used, Re-visited and Revised: the adaptive re-use of buildings throughout Toronto's architectural history."
 
The Archives displayed maps, architectural drawings, photographs and more on University College and its restoration after the 1890 fire; the many observatories on campus, including the buildings now occupied by the Munk School of Global Affairs and U of T Students’ Union; the varied uses of 1 Spadina Cres., the future home of The Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design; and the ways in which campus spaces were adapted and re-used during WWI. The Rare Book Department displayed an Antiphonal book (Florence, after 1400) with twenty-one illuminations added to chant scores by a later hand; two illustrated editions of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley’s Frankenstein (1831, 1934); an outstanding example of Medieval MS waste in Old French with partial text of the Arthurian legend used as pastedown in a 16th century book; two engravings of the rotating bookwheel, one of the most iconic reading artefacts of the Renaissance; one scrapbook kept by a worker for the Bata Shoe Company; one manuscript recipe book; and archival and ephemeral material relating to Rochdale College in Toronto.
 
Library and Archives staff thoroughly enjoyed talking with the public about what we do, what we collect, and how they can access our resources.

Week of May 23 - 27

Archives, Academics...and Rock Stars

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo Credit: Paul Till

Last week the Media Commons and the Friends of the Libraries Lecture Series collaborated on a fascinating panel discussion about the importance of preserving popular music in Canada. The star-studded panel, that packed Innis Townhall almost to capacity, included Rush guitarist Alex Lifeson, The Parachute Club lead singer Lorraine Segato, academic and musicologist Rob Bowman, and music journalist Martin Melhuish and was moderated by television producer and personality Denise Donlon.  The panel was a rousing conversation about the need to keep the valuable records of the Canadian music scene safe and preserve them for future generations to learn from them. Media Commons Director Brock Silversides started the panel with some excellent contextual information about the various different facets of the Canadian music scene – from musicians to promoters to record labels to studios – whose archival records can tell the history of popular music in Canada and then explained the challenges of preserving these records. The panelists expanded upon these words by telling their own stories of using archives or, in the case of the musicians, recognizing the need for their documents to be kept safe in Canadian archival repositories.

Along the way the audience was treated to lots of great stories about Rush and Queen Street West in the 1980s from Lifeson and Segato respectively. The panelists also had some very positive words about the Media Commons Media Archive and their mission to preserve records relating to Canadian popular music. The talk concluded with Director of the Master of Information Program Alan Galey offering some thoughts about the importance of archives in general. Overall, the night was a huge success and generated lots of great conversations amongst the audience and panelists at the reception that followed the panel in the beautiful MacLean Hunter Room of the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library.

U of T Libraries showcase collections during the Ancient Abbeys of Brittany Project Colloquium 

Researchers from across Europe and North America gathered at the University of Toronto Mississauga and the University of Toronto on May 5th and 6th, as part of the Ancient Abbeys of Brittany Project Colloquium.

 
Sponsored by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), the conference brought together scholars from Canada, France, England, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Russia and the Vatican to explore the themes of “Monasteries, convergences, exchanges and confrontations in the West of Europe in the Middle Ages”.
 
University of Toronto Libraries have been collaborating closely with the conference organizers and welcomed participants of the Colloquium during a well-attended book exhibit on May 6th at the Blackburn room, Robarts Library. Several medieval manuscripts from the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library as well as materials related to the topic of monastic culture in Medieval Europe from the Robarts Library collection were on display.
 
​The book exhibit was organized and curated by Robarts Librarians Juliya Borie, Miguel Torrens and Fisher Librarians David Fernández and P.J. Carefoote.
 
For highlights of the resources featured in the exhibit, please see: http://guides.library.utoronto.ca/aabpdisplay

Name change alert! Instruction in Library Use Committee is now Library Teaching & Learning

The Instruction in Library Use (ILU) committee is pleased to announce that its members have agreed it’s time for a new name! The group has chosen Library Teaching & Learning Committee (LTLC). They feel this new name reflects a more contemporary approach to information literacy instruction within the larger scope of teaching and learning at the university. Please expect to see this new name in communications about the committee from now on. 
 
The new email list address for the committee is “LTLCOMMITTEE-L@listserv.utoronto.ca”. 
 
If you previously subscribed to “ILU-COMMITTEE-L@listserv.utoronto.ca” you have already been migrated to the new listserv but if you would like to be removed or added please email  angela.henshilwood@utoronto.ca.

Week of May 16 - 20

OISE Library celebrates OISE's 50th Anniversary

Contributed by Jillian Harkness, photos by Marcos Armstrong

May 9th, the OISE Library helped to celebrate OISE’s 50th anniversary by taking part in the R.W.B. Jackson lecture and reception. To mark OISE’s impressive milestone, this year’s Jackson lecture was a panel discussion, moderated by TVO’s Steve Paikin and featuring OISE faculty experts Carol Campbell, Sherene Razack, Jean-Paul Restoule and Michael Skolnik. The theme for the evening was a discussion of how OISE will impact the next 50 years of education. The panel voiced their hopes for an increased dedication to social justice and diversity, a greater focus on indigenous education, and a revitalized post-secondary system.
 
Before the panel, the reception in the OISE Library treated guests to several library-curated exhibits and activities. Planned and executed by Monique Flaccavento, TALint students Bridgette Kelly and Jillian Harkness, and GSLA Marcos Armstrong, the exhibits focused on the theme “50things” in honour of the big anniversary. “50things” showcased OISE Library collections through displays of 50 OISE Press books, 50 Ontario Ministry of Education approved textbooks, 50 Orbit magazines, 50 “Pop-Fem” lectures (by prominent feminist OISE scholars), and 50 puppets.
 In honour of the iconic OISE building, “50things” included a photo exhibit of 50 unique

OISE chairs as well as an activity which invited guests to build an OISE-inspired brutalist structure from 50 wooden blocks or coloured cubes from the Library’s Curriculum Resources Collection. The OISE mission was also emphasized through an engaging display that offered guests an apple in exchange for a wish for social justice education. Finally, not forgetting the importance of fun, the “50things” displays also included 50 balloon animals and, in celebration of 50 springs at OISE, 50 colourful tulips. The well-attended and well-received event was a great way to celebrate OISE’s 50 year legacy and set a strong foundation for the 50 years to come.

 

Seed Library at Robarts Library just in time for planting season! 

ATTENTION ALL GARDENERS:  
Interested in free Detroit Dark Red beet seeds?  How about some Super Sioux tomatoes, Waldman’s dark green lettuce, or warty pumpkins?   The Inforum branch of the Toronto Seed Library, temporarily located on the 1st floor of Robarts library (Room 1017),  is open to ANYONE.    We have all kinds of vegetable and some flower seeds for the ‘borrowing’.  In the fall, ‘return’ some seeds that you’ve saved from your harvest.  That’s the seed library model!  We are open Mondays-Thursdays 10-5:30pm, and Fridays from 10-5pm. Learn more about seed libraries at http://uoft.me/inforum-seed-library-branch   OISE & New College libraries also maintain branches of the Toronto Seed Library.

Impactful Biomedical Research: Achieving Quality and Transparency, May 12th, Gerstein Science Information Centre

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
From left to right: Erica Lenton, Laure Perrier, Heather Colquhoun, Patricia Ayala, Shona Kirtley, Heather Cunningham
 
Impactful Biomedical Research: Achieving Quality and Transparency, a colloquium spear-headed by Patricia Ayala and held within the Gerstein Science Information Centre, generated much interest from its audience of faculty, graduate students, and researchers across the health sciences.  Speaking to these issues of research reproducibility and transparency were Shona Kirtley, Knowledge and Information Manager from the EQUATOR Network, University of Oxford, Laure Perrier, Research Data Management Librarian, and Heather Colquhoun, Assistant Professor, Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto. There is much conversation in the disciplines of health sciences regarding issues of research waste, quality, and reproducibility.The Lancet produced an entire issue dedicated to these issues:  http://www.thelancet.com/series/research
 
Shona Kirtley gave examples of the need to increase the quality of medical research, and how adherence to established guidelines and protocols, collected and discoverable from the EQUATOR Network website, can reduce research waste.  Laure followed with examples of unnecessary reproduction of medical research where studies continued to be funded and undertaken, wasting precious resources, time and funding to determine the effectiveness of an intervention which had already been established as effective. Heather Colquhoun, a recognized expert on scoping review methodology and part of an international team to establish scoping review protocol, discussed the rationale for conducting a scoping review.
 
Comments from attendees:
 
“This seminar has made me reflect on the skills librarians have in accessing information”
 
“I’ve always used librarians in the past for evidence syntheses and will continue to do so”
 
“Very informative and beneficial. Are there more events like this scheduled in the future? Keep me informed please!”
 
Have you visited the EQUATOR Network? Take a look at all their invaluable work and mission in Enhancing the Quality of Transparency of Health Research www.equator-network.org
 
For additional information or questions:
 
Ana Patricia Ayala - anap.ayala@utoronto.ca
 

Week of May 9 - 13

Twelfth Annual TRY Library Staff Conference 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From left to right: UTL Chief Librarian Larry Alford; TRY Conference Committee Co-chairs Dave Hagelaar and Maureen Morin; Dr. Guy Berthiaume, Librarian and Archivist of Canada; Melinda Commanda, Aboriginal Liaison Advisor in the Aboriginal Liaison Program, Statistics Canada.

On Tuesday May 3, staff from the libraries of the University of Toronto, Ryerson University, York University, and OCAD U enjoyed a day of exceptional presentations and posters, sharing ideas and information at the twelfth annual TRY Library Staff Conference.

Hosted by St. Michael’s College in the University of Toronto, the TRY Conference is organized by a team of volunteers from the partner libraries and led by co-chairs Dave Hagelaar (Kelly Library, St. Michael’s College) and Maureen Morin (UTL). This year OCAD U joined the committee and the conference as a guest partner.

Dr. Guy Berthiaume, Librarian and Archivist of Canada, delivered the keynote address, TRY saving the world: one library at a time!, to an attentive audience. Among other things, we learned that when it was formed, the Public Archives of Canada was part of the Department of Agriculture.

Melinda Commanda came to us from Statistics Canada in Sudbury, where she is an Aboriginal Liaison Advisor in the Aboriginal Liaison Program. During her presentation she shared highlights from the 2011 National Household Survey, explaining in detail how information about aboriginal communities is collected and organized. She also discussed changes to the 2016 Census, which had arrived at most of our homes the day before—very timely!

Both of these presentations, as well as some from library staff, are available from the conference website. Visit  www.library.utoronto.ca/try2016 and look under Presentation Materials.

This year we set a record for presenters and guests: 309. We also suspect that a few might not have signed the walk-in list, thereby increasing our numbers somewhat.

Feedback about the presentations and the posters was overwhelmingly positive. Once again our staff delivered inventive and engaging new content, a clear testament to their dedication to their work in support of their communities.

Renovations at the Engineering & Computer Science Library

The Engineering & Computer Science Library (ECSL) will be undergoing renovations starting this Monday, May 9. The library is scheduled to reopen on July 3. During this time, the library will not be open to the public and the physical collection will not be accessible to anyone. If you are helping a patron who is looking for an item from the ECSL please let them know that they should try to find a copy at another U of T library or, if ECSL has the only U of T copy, then they can request it via interlibrary loan.
 
ECSL staff will be available to help with reference and research questions over email, phone and patrons can still make appointments for in-person help. Also, physical course reserves will still be available, students just need to contact us in the following ways to arrange to pick them up:
 
Phone: 416-978-6494
 
Here is an FAQ page with more information about the services that are available during our closure:http://engineering.library.utoronto.ca/content/library-renovations-are-coming
 
If you have questions, please call 416-978-6494 or email engineering.library@utoronto.ca.

LIBQUAL Prize Ceremony

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The University of Toronto Libraries recently ran another instance of the LibQUAL+ survey. The survey was administered through email invitations sent to a sample of students, faculty and staff affiliated with the St. George campus. To encourage participation, survey respondents were offered the chance to enter their name into a raffle which took place in early April. Three winners were selected with the first prize, an iPad, going to Joanna Greer, a 3rd year undergraduate student majoring in Biology.  The second prize, a gift certificate to the UofT bookstore was awarded to Anthony Salerno, a Masters student in Medical Biophysics. The 3rd prize, another gift certificate, was awarded to Maureen Barry, an associate professor and director of the undergraduate program in the Lawrence S Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing.
 
Two of the three winners met  the Chief Librarian at the Fisher Rare Books Library on April 15 to receive their prizes (see photo). Stay tuned for results of the 2016 LibQUAL+ survey, coming this summer.

Week of May 2 - 6

3rd Annual UTM Celebration of Books

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
From left to right: authors Barbara Murck; Erin Tolley; Alan Walks; Mohan Matthen; Brent Wood; Kevin Coleman, posing with their books.
Photo credit: Blake Eligh, Communications Officer, Office of Advancement
 
Last week U of T Mississauga faculty members, staff and students came out to fête UTM authors at its Celebration of Books
 
The 3rd annual UTM Celebration of Books was held on Wednesday, April 27, with a great turnout and diverse mix of attendees.   The celebration was bookended with warm welcome remarks from Shelley Hawrychuk, Associate Librarian, Collections & Scholarship and UTM Deputy Chief Librarian, who spoke about the importance of the event and of books as a culmination of research and scholarship, and Bryan Stewart, UTM’s Vice-Principal, Research, who gave closing remarks, thanking everyone for attending, encouraging them to spread the word about the event, and to come again next year.
 
Six authors from a range of departments at U of T Mississauga came out to talk about their books and the process for their efforts, and 15 books in total were showcased for attendees to view as they mingled with colleagues.
 
The UTM authors who spoke were Mohan Matthen from the Department of Philosophy, Barb Murck and Alan Walks from the Department of Geography, Erin Tolley from the Department of Political Science, Kevin Coleman from the Department of Historical Studies, and Brent Wood from the Department of English and Drama.
 
For a full list of the books featured in the 2016 Celebration of Books, please see:http://guides.library.utoronto.ca/celebration_of_books_2016

Week of April 25 - 29

Media Commons celebrates National Canadian Film Day 

This past Wednesday the Media Commons celebrated the third annual National Canadian Film Day. There were two free screenings: Clement Virgo’s film Poor Boy’s Game and the Heritage Minutes from Historica Canada. The Media Commons Media Archive holds archival collections for both Clement Virgo’s company Conquering Lion Pictures and Historica Canada’s materials relating to the Heritage Minutes and both screenings also featured some treasures from those collections from props and costumes to production elements.  Additionally, the Media Commons celebrated through their social media feeds with a reference service where followers could tweet or facebook the name of an international film and would get a recommendation for a similar Canadian film.  Overall, it was a great success!

Celebrating Shakespeare at 400 at the Fisher

The Fisher Library opened its doors for a rare and special Saturday on April 23 for visitors to view the current exhibition ‘So Long Lives This’: Celebrating Shakespeare, 1616-2016. The date was significant: it was exactly 400 years ago – April 23, 1616 – when William Shakespeare died. The day is also celebrated as UNESCO World Book Day. The day was a successful one as almost 300 people came through the Fisher's revolving doors. Tours of the exhibition were led by lead curator Scott Schofield and the iSchool's Alan Galey (photo at left). There will be one more opportunity for visitors to view the exhibition on a Saturday when the Fisher will be open on May 28 for Doors Open Toronto. It will be the final day of the exhibition.

Alan Galey will also be leading a tour of the exhibition for UTL Staff on Wednesday May 18 from noon to 1 pm. More information to come!

Week of April 18 - 22

OISE Collection now accessible to patrons 

The shelving at OISE library has been repaired, and regular access to the collections has been restored. It is no longer necessary to advise patrons to use other libraries or to have them fill out the OISE Library Book Concierge request form. 
 
If you have any questions, please contact Monique Flaccavento:monique.flaccavento@utoronto.ca

Week of April 11 - 15

The Li Koon Chun Finance Learning Centre’s 2nd Annual IMI Finance Competition

Bull markets, bear markets! The 2nd Annual IMI Finance Competition wrapped this past March 16th in a closing ceremony with over 100 attendees, including competition participants, industry representatives, judges, VIPs, and representatives of various student groups. 

Sponsored by the Finance Learning Centre (FLC), in collaboration with UTM’s three main undergraduate management and economics student societies, the IMI Finance Competition’s goal was to provide hands-on, experiential learning in trading and investing for all UTM undergraduate students.  Participants each started the competition on November 17th with $100,000 in virtual funds with which to design and execute a trading strategy.  Students then spent the next five months virtually trading stocks.

At the close of the competition, the twenty participants with the biggest increase in their portfolio’s value were invited to submit brief presentations outlining their investment strategy. Five individuals were then selected to present before a panel of judges at a closing ceremony held in the atrium of the Innovation Complex.  Three winners were awarded cash prizes of $1000, $500 and $250, with additional plaques bestowed to participants in such categories as ‘Most Honest Trader’ and ‘Wolf of Bay Street’. 

This year’s competition saw a significant increase in the number of active traders from the previous year and in overall engagement, due in part to two new, easy-to-use trading platforms and a focus on communication before and during the competition.  New sponsors and contributions from both Institute for Management & Innovation (IMI) and the UTM Library also helped increase the value of the total prize package offered to winners.

The FLC was delighted to partner with students groups to offer this event – and looks forward to continuing to build on the success of this year’s Competition in 2016-17.  Special thanks are owed to Lab Manager Andrew Graham who worked closely with student group executives to manage this event from its planning stage through to the closing ceremonies.

Try out the Communications Checklist – Events, Initiatives, and Projects

A new checklist has been created to provide information and access to the tools and communications avenues that the University of Toronto Libraries is able to provide to support marketing and promotions of your library events, initiatives, and projects – it is broken out into actions to taken Before, During, and After your event has passed. Each section is sorted by the notice required for each task.

For any questions or feedback, please contact Acting Communications Librarian, Jesse Carliner, (416) 946-3803.

Final exam “unstudy” spots at Robarts and Gerstein!

Logo and image for "unstudy spots"

From April 14-29, unwind with colouring, origami, puzzles, and more, at Robarts Library and Gerstein Science Information Centre. Colour in Gerstein or Robarts! Fold your way to relaxation with origami! Find your peace with puzzles! For Robarts Library, look for the table by the TCard office, second floor. At Gerstein, the unstudy station is in the lobby. Share your creations on Instagram or Twitter and mention @uoftlibraries or @gersteinlibrary for a chance to be featured! 

Contact Heather Buchansky (Robarts) or Vincci Lui (Gerstein) with any questions.

TSpace launches assisted deposit for Tri-Agency Open Access Policy compliance

CIHR, SSHRC, and NSERC grant recipients can comply with the new Tri-Agency Open Access Policy for Publications by submitting a copy of their publications to the U of T research repository, TSpace.  This policy applies to all grants awarded by NSERC or SSHRC from May 1, 2015 and onward; and by CIHR from January 1, 2008 and onward.

This summer, the TSpace team is offering additional assistance by processing and depositing grant-funded research on behalf of the authors. The TSpace team will review individual publications or a body of publications, check for publisher permissions, deposit materials to TSpace, and provide authors with a permanent link to their publications. 

Visit our First Time Users page to get started. 

The pilot program will be in service from April 2016 through August 2016.

New Fisher Flickr Set: Canadian bookplates

The Fisher Library possesses an extensive bookplate collection dating from the eighteenth to the twentieth century, referencing prominent figures and institutions in Canadian history. Reaching across Canada as well as the United Kingdom, the ex-libris collection comprises a wide range of owners. Provenance for some bookplates include prime ministers, military commanders, universities, libraries, private businesses and journalistic groups. The collection also offers a wide range of styles, representing a great variety in bookplate artistry. Some of the styles consist of armorial, pictorial, printed, emblematic, and hand-written bookplates. Many ex-libris have extraordinary artwork by notable artists like J.E.H. MacDonald and Francis Adams, while others possess witty rhymes, elegant mottos and family crests.

Some of these bookplates, with examples below, are now available through an album on the Fisher's Flickr stream. These are just a sampling of the collection as there are more than 1,000 bookplates are available in the library’s physical collection.

A finding aid of the collection can be found by clicking on the link. Some examples can be seen below (click on the image for a larger view), while the rest of the set can be accessed here.

Student intern Selin Kahramanoglu was responsible for preparing the finding aid for the collection and for curating the set of images on Flickr.

Week of April 4 - 8

35 years of Degrassi event exhorts audience to "just do it"

Linda and Stefan of Degrassi at event in beside 300 episodes cakeA diverse, multi-generational audience of Friends of the Libraries members, donors, students, and fans were treated to a delightful talk at Innis Town Hall on March 31st by Linda Schuyler and Stefan ‘Snake’ Brogren on 35 Years of Degrassi: Sexual Awakening, Peer Pressure & Bad Hair Days. This engaging conversation between two long-time friends and colleagues ran the gamut from Linda’s early DIY approach to creating television for young people, to how they developed the diverse and compelling stories that teens love about Degrassi, and continue to relate to so strongly.

Interspersed with clips from Degrassi’s most iconic episodes and groundbreaking storylines, Linda and Stefan’s relaxed and revealing chat gave the audience a rare inside look into the challenges and joys of working on the various incarnations of Degrassi, and the immensely collaborative process behind developing a successful television series.  It was a treat for an audience to hear a series creator (along with a beloved cast member and director) discuss one of the most important and enduring series in the history of Canadian television. Degrassi’s recent move to Netflix even further solidifies its role as a formative and relevant franchise, one which continues to honour young people’s experiences by telling their stories honestly.

Linda Schuyler is not only a Canadian television legend, she is also one of the Libraries’ most dedicated supporters and friends. Her generosity in establishing the Linda Schuyler Digitization Fund for Preservation and Access ensures that students and researchers will be able to access important media collections for years to come.

The evening concluded with a wonderful Q&A session, which made it abundantly clear to both audience and guest speakers what a positive impact Degrassi had and continues to have on teens’ lives. Linda Schuyler’s advice to a fan who was interested in pursuing her creative passion was simple but powerful: ‘just do it.’ Linda became a teacher ‘by default’, but soon afterward discovered her calling as a producer, and harnessed her energies to become an innovator in a genre that didn’t really exist before she created it. That passion and persistence resulted in a lifelong career and has impacted literally millions of lives over the years.

Listen to Linda. Grab that dusty film gear from the storeroom and figure out how to use it. Create the art or tell the story you feel like no one is making or telling. Just do it.

Enhanced equipment loans at Robarts Library

Additional equipment has been added to the stock of items that can be borrowed from the 4th floor Course Reserves Loan Desk.  

In addition to portable phone chargers (also works for tablets) and laptop security cables, the library now offers noise-cancelling headphones, USB keys, and PC laptop chargers (we're getting Mac chargers but they are not in yet).

If you have any questions about this service, email Megan Lee, Senior Access Services Associate.

Collection access during OISE Library shelf repairs

It has been discovered that some of the shelving in the OISE Library is in need of repairs. During this time, certain areas of the stacks will not be accessible to users or staff. Please advise patrons to visit other libraries if there are other copies of a title in the library system. If the only copy of a title is at OISE Library, OISE Library staff will retrieve the item for the patron, if it is safe for them to do so. If it is not safe to retrieve the item, OISE Library staff will advise the patron to place an ILL request. Please have the patron fill out the OISE Library Book Concierge request form: https://oise.library.utoronto.ca/content/book-concierge

If you have any questions, please contact Monique Flaccavento: monique.flaccavento@utoronto.ca

43 New study carrels installed in Kelly Library

Study carrels at Kelly Library“The John M. Kelly library is delighted to announce the creation of forty-three new individual study spaces on our third floor.  Ranged along the north and east walls, with a view of the changing seasons, the long birch tables have frosted glass panels for privacy and electrical outlets for power, all amidst silence for inspired study.

The project came about in response to our survey of students in the fall of 2015. They asked for additional individual study areas and, with contributions from the Friends of the John M. Kelly Library, PwC, USMC staff members, alumni and friends, we were able to create these new workspaces and improve the comfort of the library for students and staff.”

[Read more]

Register for TRY 2016: The Responsive Library

Image to promote "The Responsive Library" - TRY 2016Tuesday, May 3, 2016 | University of Toronto | St. Michael's College

Visit our website at www.library.utoronto.ca/try2016 to view this year's presentations, check the schedule and register for the conference. We look forward to a day of outstanding sessions FREE to all staff appointed members.

This conference provides an opportunity for all members of the University of Toronto, Ryerson University, York University, and OCAD University library communities to gather together for a day of learning and socializing with colleagues. 

Space is limited, so register early to avoid disappointment! Registration will close at 6 pm on Monday, April 25.

Week of March 28 - April 1

U of T Libraries a partner in sustainability

Highlights from the 2015-2016 Sustainability Yearbook show a glimpse into environmental efforts on the St. George campus over the last year. And, U of T Libraries is glad to be recognized for efforts toward greening the campus, and the city.

Yet again, Gerstein Science Information Centre retains its status as a certified green office, along with other select departments such as Student Life. Also noted, in the info centre is the Green Beet Cafe, home to local, sustainable, and vegetarian options.

Many of the libraries have been involved in projects to reduce emissions, now saving thousands of tons of emissions from being released into the air.

Chart of emission reductions for projects on St. George campus   Green Beet

Congrats to all involved, and check out the full 2015 - 2015 Sustainability Yearbook for more inspiration.

 

Temporary move of the Inforum (Faculty of Information Library) to Robarts

On April 4, the Faculty of Information Inforum staff, services, and collections are taking up temporary residence in Robarts, while the Inforum is renovated. This temporary arrangement is expected to last until the Fall of 2016.

The Inforum Course Reserves Service desk, for circulation of print course readings and of technology loaned to Faculty of Information students, is located in the former Digital Studio space adjacent to Robarts ILL services (Room 1017).  

 

The hours of opening are:

Monday to Thursday: 10:00 am to 5:30 pm

Friday: 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

Weekends and holidays: Closed 

 

The phone number for the Inforum remains the same: (416) 978-7060

 

The circulating collection and the non-circulating periodicals are shelved on the 13th floor, in the yellow shelves immediately adjacent to the 13th floor sorting shelves.  Signs are posted on the 13th floor to lead users to these materials. Although these materials are shelved according to the Dewey decimal classification system, they will circulate as Robarts holdings in order that all borrowers may use the Robarts Loan Services Desk during Robarts opening hours, or the self-charge machines, and the Robarts book return.   

External visitors who wish to use the Inforum collection, but who do not have a TCard or other valid stack access ID, will need to contact the Inforum Service desk to have material retrieved. The retrieved material will be placed at the Robarts Loan Services Desk for pick-up and in-house use, as the hours of opening are longer.

Books will automatically circulate according to Robarts Library circulation policies. Fines will be paid at the Robarts Loan Services Desk, if being paid in person. 

Reference services will be provided to the Inforum community in the 1st floor space.

Inforum staff will be based in several locations in the Robarts building, including Rooms 1008, 1016, and on the 6th floor. Phone numbers for the Inforum staff remain the same as posted in the Staff Directory or University e-phonebook.

Week of March 21 - 25

LGBTQ Film Series - collaborative, educational, and lively

Contributed by Rachel E. Beattie, Assistant Media Archivist, Media Commons

This past Thursday, March 10th saw the successful completion (and great turnout) to the LGBTQ Film Series held at the Media Commons. This free-of-charge series is a monthly educational film series sponsored by U of T Libraries, the U of T Sexual & Gender Diversity Office, and a rotating group of student organizations, campus offices, and university departments. The series showcases films within the U of T Libraries collection that focus on the lives of LGBTQ people in Canada and internationally. This season, the group screened: Appropriate Behaviour, Tongues Untied, Flag Wars, Queers in the Kingdom, Two Spirits, and Fiction and Other Truths: a film about Jane Rule.  These films covered a breadth of topics, such as bi-visibility, racism, gentrification, intersectionality, religion, queer Indigenous people, and queer advocacy.

The organizing committee for the screenings is Jesse Carliner (Reference & Research Services / Chief Librarian's Office), Sara McDowell (Reference & Research Services / Collection Development), Allison Burgess (Sexual & Gender Diversity Office), Rachel E. Beattie (Media Commons), and Jordan Hale (Map and Data Library).  Each screening had additional partners based on the group that collaborated with the library. Gorgeous posters promoting each month’s films were created by UTL’s graphic designer, Maureen Morin.

The series was a huge success with large turnouts even during busy times of the year (like last week!). The screenings were followed by lively educational discussions with experts on the topic, or, in the case of Fiction and Other Truths, the filmmaker Lynne Fernie, that helped students to think and to talk about some of the issues raised in the screening. These discussions really allowed the students to participate in the screening and they had a lot to say about each film.  

We hope to do it all again next year, so if you would like to participate, or to suggest films for next year’s screening series, please contact Jesse Carliner, Acting Communications and Reference Librarian.

 

Bella the Therapy Dog is back March 29 to April 21!

Paws for a Study Break returns for the spring exam season!

From Tuesday, March 29 - Thursday, April 21, come by the Gerstein Library to play and de-stress with Bella the St. John Ambulance therapy dog.

Full schedule and latest updates about Bella's visits:  

http://gerstein.library.utoronto.ca/content/bella-therapy-dog-visits


Remember to share all your posts on Twitter/Instagram with the tag #BellaAtGerstein!

Photo of Bella the Therapy Dog

Week of March 14 -18

Visiting Systems Librarian, Kosuke Tanabe, shares e-resource insights

Visiting Librarian Kosuke Tanabe in front of windows looking out of Gerstein Kosuke Tanabe, Systems Librarian at the prestigious National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), located in Tsukuba-city, Japan, has made Toronto and UTL home for the last two months, gaining and sharing insights into e-resource management. Just this month, NIMS was ranked by Thomson Reuters as the world's 18th most innovative research institution. Kosuke shared more about this experience at a presentation at Gerstein Science Information Centre this Monday.

Coming from a system of 3 libraries at each of their 3 campuses (some of these libraries are unattended, with video phone service available), Kosuke has jumped into the complexity that is the 44-library system of UTL.

Much of Kosuke's time at UTL has been spent addressing the value of  Compendex and Scopus (used at both institutions), databases which have nearly 100% overlap of source content, but which may provide very different sets of results and very different records. Questions like these are pressing as libraries seek cost-savings in collections management.

Assessing usage and features of both, Kosuke has engaged in using tools such as SCOT (Serials Collections Overlap Tool) from Scholars Portal, analyzing title lists from journals, and calculating searching and viewing statistics.

Back at NIMS, Kosuke will continue to work on this perennial issue, addressing further access-log-based usage statistics, determining overall usage and determining relevant user groups to the respective resources.

Finding time to also shadow librarians and create connections at the Engineering & Computer Science Library, and taking an English language class, Kosuke has had a busy two months. Experiencing a different culture and work environment, Kosuke shared an interest in how diversity and equity is expressed and supported at UTL - something that he finds compelling and necessary for NIMS to look into, especially with the number of international researchers who find their way to NIMS.

Now available at the U of T Archives: The Roxana Ng fonds

Contributed by Karen Suurtamm, Archivist, UTARMS

Pieces from the Roxana Ng FondsThe University of Toronto Archives is pleased to announce that the Roxana Ng fonds is now available to researchers. Professor Roxana Ng (1951-2013) was a Professor at OISE whose research and activism focused on issues facing immigrant women and garment workers, especially in the Canadian context. The first woman of colour to hold a tenure track position at OISE, Professor Ng was also a key researcher in critical pedagogy, decolonizing pedagogy, and embodied learning.

Professor Ng was a true activist-scholar, and worked closely with countless organizations to support and fight for the rights of immigrant women and homeworkers across Canada. In particular, Professor Ng was a key member of the Homeworkers Association (HWA), who organized training, support, and social events for homeworkers, particularly those in the garment industry.

At more than 50 boxes, Professor Ng’s archive documents the work and life of an inspiring scholar and community member. The papers include articles, research notes, subject files, meeting minutes, public education material, and photographs.

The finding aid for the Roxana Ng fonds can be found here: https://utarms.library.utoronto.ca/roxana-ng-fonds

Week of March 7 - 11

UTL hosts Archives Unleashed web archive hackathon

On March 3rd through 5th, Robarts Library hosted the Archives Unleashed: Web Archive Hackathon. The event was made possible with the generous support of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the National Science Foundation, the University of Waterloo, University of Toronto Libraries, Rutgers University, the University of Québec en Outaouais, the Internet Archive, Library and Archives Canada, and Compute Canada.

The event brought together 45 researchers from across Canada, the United States, and Europe to collaboratively develop new open-source tools and approaches to web archive analysis. Attendees assembled into teams and created innovative tools for analyzing datasets as diverse as 10 years’ worth of web crawls of Canadian Political Party and Political Interest Group sites to Twitter data about Donald Trump.

The next installment of Archives Unleashed will be hosted at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. The call for proposals closes on March 15th.

The organizers would like to express their gratitude to library staff that made this event a success. Check Twitter for the hashtag #hackarchives for more information about the hackathon projects.

 

U of T Scarborough Library supports student hackathon for financial literacy

The winner of last weekend's UTSC Hackathon

 

On Family Day weekend, the U of T Scarborough Library brought students together to find ways to make it easier for families to manage money.

The average Canadian household has debt of $60,000, according to Statistics Canada data from 2012. This debt is only increasing and there is concern that financial literacy is slipping. These issues were the basis of this year's UTSC Hackathon: #FinanceHacksThe event was sponsored by the UTSC Library, The Hub, and the Departments of Management and Computer and Mathematical Sciences (CMS), Xignite Inc., and DBRS Inc.

 

“There is growing concern that the average Canadian doesn’t have the financial knowledge to make important decisions about their finances whether it's saving for university, how to manage student debt or spend that money that you’re making, how to invest for retirement, or how to plan for old age,” says Stephanie Perpick, liaison librarian to the Department of Management.

Read the full article

Week of February 22 - 26

Yuki Suzuki heartened by five-month visit at UTL

Visiting Librarian Yuki Suzuki nears the end of her five-month visit to UTL, but not without a new network of colleagues, a dozen of which attended her presentation on Friday, February 19, to hear what she had learned through a wide assortment of visiting activities. Yuki expressed a very deep and sincere thanks, saying how “all inspired very much”. If you haven’t had a chance to meet Yuki, or to say goodbye, Yuki will be at UTL until Monday, February 29.

Yuki comes from Keio University, one of the largest universities in Japan, where she is currently with the Circulation and Interlibrary Loan Department, Shonan Fujisawa Media Center. The goal of her visit has been to share and gain knowledge for both institutions. Yuki interacted with Cataloguing, the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library, Collections Development, and Access & Information, along with having time to see a handful of other libraries, like TPL. Other visits were arranged from the ALA Midwinter Meeting in Boston to the Harvard-Yenching Library, and the Ontario Library Association Super Conference.

Photo of Group at Yuki Suzuki's presentationYuki has been UTL’s 8th visitor on exchange, and the visits have all been well-received and enjoyed. Yuki’s time with the libraries was ambitious given her scope of learning, a necessity when, in Japanese libraries such as hers, there is a reshuffle of roles every few years. Some experience was hands-on, such as with the Music Library and cataloguing Japanese materials, other topics were broader, like assessment and collaboration. Yuki remarked at how there are no specialist roles at Keio University like our Assessment or User Experience Librarians.

Yuki was also surprised to see the extent of collaboration that UTL engages in, in spite of its many resources. The experience in Japan is somewhat different. Around 800 universities in Japan, most of which are small, private institutions depend on collaboration, such as inter-library loans.

Yuki provided information on Keio University, including such initiatives as setting up a new LSP, and piloting e-books. Digital initiatives is something that Keio University would be very interested to gain greater expertise and guidance on.

Questions followed the presentation from library colleagues curious about how knowledge is captured and transferred in the day-to-day life of librarians in Japan, and at Keio University, given the role reshuffle that occurs every few years. Yuki responded that lots of notes have to be recorded all of the time, and more additional notes whenever the reshuffle does happen.

Yuki, true to character, spoke highly of her time at UTL, appreciating “warm hearts even in cold winter”.

 

Browsing library "shelves"

The Shelf BImage of catalogue record and new "Browse Shelf" buttonrowse beta application offers library users a way of browsing catalogue items as they appear on the actual library shelf. The default shows all library items on the shelf, but can be filtered to individual libraries. Previous / Next buttons move users along the shelf by call number and are hyperlinked to the item record in the library catalogue. Title, author, publication/date, status, format, library location, and call number are displayed for each record. Group records are ungrouped from the catalogue search and each holding is given an entry as it would appear on the shelf.

To access Shelf Browse, simply perform a catalogue search at http://search.library.utoronto.ca and click the Browse Shelf button next to any holding, launching the application in a new tab.

 

Give a second life to your old pens

The University of Toronto Students’ Union Sustainability Commission wants to help you give a second life to your used writing instruments. All pens collected by this pen drive will be dropped off with companies that can recycle or upcycle these used writing instruments.

Find the donation box now on the desk at the first floor stack entrance.

Image source: John Hain, Pixabay

Week of February 15 - 19

Victoria University Library acquires innovative William Blake plates

In December 2015, Victoria University Library acquired five plates from the first issue, first printing of William Blake’s Songs of Innocence. Songs was printed by the author and printer William Blake and his wife Catherine Blake in London between 1789 and 1790 and is considered innovative for its representation of Blake’s poetic text within an artistic framework. With this significant acquisition, Victoria University Library joins the ranks of academic libraries at Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard, and Yale, who also own versions of Blake’s earliest printing efforts. This new acquisition is part of the G.E.Bentley: Blake Collection at the E.J. Pratt Library.

Learning when you want it with archived webinars

Have you missed a recent webinar? Check out the archive of past webinars. Email Gail Nichol for access. 

In the archive. Click on 2016 to see the most recent ones. E.g. Going Out of Bounds with Reference Services or Innovative Instructional Partnerships for Librarians and Writing Faculty.

Remember that many of the webinars are only archived for one year, so take a look at 2015 while you still can.

This initiative is organized and promoted by the Staff Development Committee. Contact Gail Nichol for any questions.

Week of February 8 - 12

Law Library collection returns to Bora Laskin

The Law Library collection that is currently shelved at Robarts Library will move this week to its renewed space at the Bora Laskin Law Library. Upgraded with current technology and research tools, the library space includes an information commons, quiet areas for reading, and research and group study rooms.

Catalogue records will also be updated this week to reflect the change. The collections will be accessible as of February 22nd.

HVAC replacement at Gerstein

Work has begun on the replacement of two HVAC units at Gerstein Science Information Centre and will run to April 4th. During this time, this HVAC work will require the shutdown of two units. This replacement work is being done now, since the conditions are more optimal - in winter time, the humidity and temperature can be controlled. During spring or summer, the humidity and temperature would not be controllable.
 

Starting Monday, February 8, these staff and public areas MAY be affected:

  • Wallace Room
  • Access & Info area and Short Term Loans area
  • Gerstein Reading Room
  •  2nd Floor Librarian and GSLA offices, group study rooms, graduate study carrels, Miriam Ticoll’s Health Science Information Consortium of Toronto office, and washrooms
     

What does this mean for library staff and patrons:

  • Affected areas should not lose heat, will be maintained at a comfortable level, and can remain occupied
  • There will be temporary solutions in place to maintain airflow, but there may be occasions when affected areas may get stuffier than usual
  • All work will be confined to mechanical areas, and every effort will be made to keep noise and disruption to a minimum. Noisy work will take place before 9:00 am
  • Workers will be using the main stairwell to the second floor, but efforts will be made to keep the area as clear as possible for staff and the public
     

If you have any questions or concerns about this project, please ask Renata Holder.

If patrons have any feedback or questions, please direct them to ask.gerstein@utoronto.ca.

A news announcement to the public will be posted next week on the Gerstein Library website.

Week of February 1 - 5

Tempo of China: photo exhibition reflects China's modern, diverse, and vibrant nature

One special attendee immersed in the photos on exhibit

The opening ceremony of the "Tempo of China" photo exhibition took place at the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library, on January 27. In his remarks, Consul General Xue Bing highlighted the exhibits’ depiction of China in the 21st century as a modern, diverse, and vibrant country – in contrast to the commonly held belief and representation of China as an ancient civilization. In addition to sponsoring the photo exhibition, the Consulate of the People’s Republic of China in Toronto also generously donated various books on contemporary China to the university community. See the China Daily’s news report on this event.

The event was attended by Mr. Xue Bing, Consul General of the People’s Republic of China in Toronto, Ms. Judith Wolfson, Vice-President, University Relations, University of Toronto, Mr. Larry Alford, Chief Librarian of the University of Toronto Libraries, Mr. Justin Poy, founding advisory committee member of the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library, Mr. Godwin Chan, Councilor, Ward 6, Town of Richmond Hill, Dr. Jack Leong, Director of the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library, as well as members of the community and the media.

The “Tempo of China” photo exhibition is open to the public at the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library and the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library, both located on the 8th floor of Robarts Library, until February 19.

Launch of French Renaissance Paleography website

Image of renaissance text

Composition de toutes sortes de feux artificiels, Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, MSS 03105

The Information Technology Services Department (ITS) at the U of T Libraries has launched French Renaissance Paleography, a website that provides scholars and students the opportunity to practice paleography.

Paleography, the study of handwriting, prompts scholarly investigations into the details of medieval and early modern life that were recorded by hand rather than in print. The website provides a set of pedagogical paleography tools and provides access to over 100 manuscripts. Curated mainly from the Newberry Library collection, the site also includes manuscripts from the collections of the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Huntington Library, the Morgan Library & Museum, and UTL’s very own Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library.

Supported by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, this three-year collaborative project was led by the Newberry Library, in partnership with the Saint Louis University, Iter: Gateway to the Middle Ages & Renaissance, and the University of Toronto Libraries. The Paleography site is hosted by ITS, and built using the Islandora platform (Drupal, Fedora), and T-PEN software.

We invite you to visit the site and share your feedback. Get started with a quick introduction to tools and resources available to you.

ITS wishes to extend thanks to all those who worked on the project and especially our wonderful collaborators at the Newberry, SLU, and Iter.

Robarts library patron elevators resume regular service

Post-renovation, the Robarts library patron elevators will now serve:

P1, P2, P3 - floors 1, 4, 9 - 13 (Stacks)

P4 - floors 2, 7, 8, 14

P5 - floors 1 - 5

Thank you for your patience throughout these changes. Please direct any questions to Acting Communications Librarian, Jesse Carliner: (416) 978-1757

Week of January 25 - 29

Retired magazine collection put into digital Orbit

Contributed by Jillian Harkness

Photo of Orbit magazine at 20 yearsThe OISE Library is excited to announce that Orbit: OISE’s Magazine for Schools, an OISE publication which ran from 1969 - 2008, has been fully digitized and is now openly-accessible on the Internet Archive. The magazine features practical articles stemming from the research of many OISE faculty and is a record of the Institute's long-standing relationship with the education community.

The project was initiated in response to a request from OISE Dean, Glen Jones, and digitization was coordinated by OISE TALint student Jillian Harkness, in collaboration Monique Flaccavento, Lari Langford, Bobby Glushko, and staff at the Internet Archive.

As one of two publications to evolve out of the Ontario Journal of Education Research, Orbit was designed to link the research of OISE to the everyday practice of Ontario teachers. Hugh Oliver, founding editor of Orbit, notes that in the early years, Orbit not only explored new ideas in education but also played a role in public relations for OISE, at a time when the Institute was newly-founded and still establishing its relationship with the community.

Early articles featured interviews with Northrop Frye and Paulo Freire, reports on experimental education from open plan schools to non-graded systems, as well as critical discussions of educational theory. A long-running series of back covers profiled various public schools from around Ontario through photos and short write ups. Early issues came with teacher aids, including audio records, projector slides, text "masks" for reading comprehension, as well as teaching resources that could be ordered “from the community” which included organizations like the Ontario Department of Lands and Forests and the Aluminium Company of Canada.

                                      Row of Orbit magazine covers

Popularity continued through the 1990s, under editor, Heather Berkeley, and during this time, Orbit played a crucial role in facilitating conversations around the educational reforms of the era. Themed issues took on challenging topics of the time, including safe schools, gender and schooling, and anti-racist education, and special inserts offered practical solutions for incorporating these ideas into work in the classroom. In 2008, after a very successful and almost 40-year run, Orbit was retired; however, as Berkeley wrote in the magazine’s final issue, its struggle to “cross the practice/research divide” lives on at OISE. The newly-digitized collection of Orbit, now available openly online, preserves the ideas and enthusiasm behind this goal, and will serve to inspire current and future generations of teachers, researchers, and the wider educational community.

Entrepid new listserv at UTL

Entrepreneurship is fast-growing at U of T, and the library is playing a key role in supporting that growth. To stay on top of ongoing entrepreneurship activities at UTL, entrepreneurship librarian Carey Toane started the EntrepidLibrary-L listserv last fall.

The libraries’ suite of relevant workshops and resources continues to grow and develop; however, the focus of the list has now shifted to include building a network of colleagues beyond the library who are engaged with entrepreneurship on campus and in the broader community.

“We often have calls for entrepreneurs’ participation in events such as speaking, networking or mentoring opportunities, or to attend workshops and conference livestreams,” says Toane.

“To be able to reach these people collectively would be a huge benefit in terms of spreading awareness of the various entrepreneurship activities the library is involved in.”

Student in suit shaking hands with woman in blue blouse at a student expoSubscribe by sending an e-mail to listserv@listserv.utoronto.ca. In the body of the message, include this line, completed with your name: subscribe entrepidlibrary-l firstname lastname

  • Post information about relevant resources and upcoming events (e.g. workshops or training open to the university community, reviews of new resources, articles, blog posts, free web tools, calls for funding, exciting research, webinars, and professional development activities)
  • As a new member, introduce yourself, so we can get to know one another, and pass on this invitation to anyone who might be interested.

Stratford Shakespeare Festival actors panel underlines impact of original text

Contributed by Alexandra Kordoski

On January 19th, the Friends of the Fisher Library were treated to a unique evening at the library with three Stratford Shakespeare Festival actors. Seana McKenna, Graham Abbey, and Johnathan Goad joined Noam Lior of the University of Toronto’s Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies for a panel discussion, lead by English professor Scott

Schofield of Western University. The discussion weighed heavily on the First Folio of Shakespeare’s plays, printed in 1623 – the only Canadian copy of which resides in the Fisher Library. The actors recounted how the first printed text informed their training and development as actors, while providing insight into the complex process of translating Shakespeare’s work ‘from the page to the stage.’ Particularly compelling were the actors’ examples of situations where a single piece of punctuation in the original text could be interpreted in different ways and result in entirely different stage performances.

The event brought together actors, theatre historians and textual scholars, and highlighted that the text of the First Folio – printed over three hundred years ago – is still a vital part of contemporary theatre. The panel took place in conjunction with the Fisher Library’s upcoming exhibition marking the four hundredth anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, ‘So long lives this’: Celebrating Shakespeare 1616-2016, curated by Scott Schofield, Peter Blayney, Alan Galey, and Marjorie Rubright.

LibQUAL+ survey: valuable information to plan future library services

From the LibQual Coordinating Group

The University of Toronto Libraries will once again be participating in the LibQUAL+ survey. The 2016 survey will launch on Monday, February 1st, and remain open for several weeks.

LibQUAL+ is a survey developed by the Association of Research Libraries that measures user perceptions and expectations of library service quality in three dimensions:

·         Affect of Service – customer services provided by library staff

·         Information Control – library resources and collections

·         Library as Place – library spaces, facilities, and amenities 

UTL previously participated in the survey in 2007, 2010, and 2013, so we will have the ability to compare this year’s results to past outcomes.

-

The survey will be administered via e-mail invitations that will be sent to undergraduate and graduate students, as well as faculty and staff members.  Library staff are not included in the sample population and are asked not to complete the survey if they receive an invitation.

Users who have questions or are having difficulty in accessing or completing the survey may also contact the following for assistance:

St. George affiliated users:  libqual.utl@utoronto.ca

UTM affiliated users: libqual-utm-l@listserv.utoronto.ca

UTSC affiliated users: matthew.gertler@utoronto.ca

Additional information about the survey is available in the Survey FAQ.

Please relay this information to your student staff who work in public service areas of the library.

Communications @ UTL refresh of promotional and event support pages

Your Communications team at UTL has recently updated both information pages and forms to request promotional and event support in the libraries. Find these updated pages in the Communications and Marketing Support: University of Toronto Libraries LibGuide, under Promotional and Event Support.

UTL Branded Items:

Photos are now available of all UTL Branded items that can be booked for your events at UTL. Please use the new form to book all UTL Branded items. This also includes any UTL publications you may need.

UTL Branded Gifts:

Photos are also available of gifts that are given to visitors and speakers. Please use the new form to request gifts for your UTL events and for your visitors.

 

Promotional Support:

Please use the new form to request promotional support for your event, program, or services.

With all requests, please allow for at least one week's notice so that we may best assist you with your promotion and event needs.

If you have any questions or feedback on these updated pages and forms, please contact UTL Communications Assistant, Christopher Piché.

 

Week of January 18 - 22

UTL Library staff edit over 50 articles in Wikipedia Edit-a-thon

On Friday, January 15, the University of Toronto Libraries were official participants in a Wikipedia library outreach initiative to celebrate the 15th anniversary of Wikipedia. The campaign, called #1Lib1Ref, was described as a global “micro-contributions drive” with the goal of engaging professionals working in the research, library, and cultural sectors to improve the quality of Wikipedia articles. Information professionals were asked to contribute one reference for one article. The libraries participated in the initiative by holding a Wikipedia edit-a-thon where staff members edited over 50 articles, contributing high quality open access resources to relevant Wikipedia articles. Resources added to Wikipedia articles included web archive collections and digitized document collections. Since Wikipedia articles are the starting point for research by many of our users, we are providing an additional access point to our collections by including UTL resources on Wikipedia articles.

Stephanie Pegg, Digital Curation intern in the Information Technology Services department and Abigail Sparling, a TALint library assistant in the Reference and Research Services Department (Robarts Library) filled a spreadsheet with digital resources and suggested articles. Librarians Kelli Babcock and Eveline Houtman co-hosted the event and helped participants navigate the Wikipedia platform. Some U of T staff members worked independently and tweeted about the event.

If you would like to find about more about this event or how you can get involved with promoting access to UTL digital collections through Wikipedia, please email Acting Communications Librarian Jesse Carliner, jesse.carliner@utoronto.ca

Letters of Stalin's daughter, Svetlana Alliluyeva, acquired by Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library

Adapted from U of T News article - [Read full article]

The tragic life of Josef Stalin’s daughter, Svetlana Alliluyeva, who defected from the Soviet Union but always remained in the shadow of one of history’s most reviled figures is the subject of the award-winning book Stalin’s Daughter, written by U of T professor emeritus Rosemary Sullivan. “It’s a moving book,” says Anne Dondertman, Associate Librarian for Special Collections. “You read it and you realize this person had a lot to deal with in her life and she never really found peace. And now we have a part of that story here”. Thanks to Sullivan, Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library has acquired letters used in the book that were written by Alliluyeva in the final years of her life to her best friend, Mary Burkett. 

Several hundred letters − some typed, some handwritten, a few with doodles and photographs − offer a rare glimpse into the woman who shocked the world in 1967 when she stepped into the American Embassy in India to defect to the United States. With Burkett, a British art historian and adventurer, Alliluyeva was able to open up and talk about her childhood in the Kremlin, offer a glimpse into her politically astute mind and feel free to both denounce Stalin and criticize Russian President Vladimir Putin. 

Sullivan, who had used the letters during the course of her research, was alerted by a friend when Burkett’s possessions and collections from her 14th Century manor – including the letters – went up for auction. Negotiating by telephone during some tense moments on behalf of the library, Sullivan was able to acquire the letters for about $2,000, using funds from the Joan Randall Endowment Fund at the Fisher Library. 

Sullivan had first come across Burkett when she was researching her book, and Alliluyeva’s daughter suggested Sullivan speak to her mother’s pen pal. Burkett and Alliluyeva had met in 1995 and bonded over felt art. Burkett, a champion of the arts was considered a world authority on the art of felt making. The letters run from 1995 to 2011, the year of Alliluyeva’s death. 

The letters will be available to the public as part of a collection of archives of Sullivan’s research papers, correspondence and early manuscripts.

Weeks of January 4 - 15

Librarians at Faculty of Music Library discover lost violin concerto

The Faculty of Music Library has discovered Norwegian composer Johan Halvorsen’s violin concerto that was believed lost for over a century. Violinist Henning Kraggerud will perform the 21st-century premiere of the concerto under the direction of Bjarte Engeset in Stavenger, Norway in July 2016 as part of the International Musicological Society's annual conference.

Halvorsen (1864-1935) dedicated his violin concerto to the world-renowned Canadian violinist Kathleen Parlow (1890-1963). Parlow gave its first performance on August 14, 1909 in Scheveningen, Holland. Later that year, she gave two more performances of the concerto with the Nationaltheatret Orchestra in Oslo (then Christiania) under the baton of the composer himself. It is believed that there have been no further performances of the concerto since.

Following her successful career as a soloist, Parlow continued her involvement with the violin as a teacher and chamber musician. She lived in Toronto from 1941 to the end of her life in 1963. Throughout this period, she was involved in the chamber music scene of the city and taught many distinguished Canadian violinists.

Parlow's papers, including her correspondences, photographs and music scores, were donated to the Faculty of Music Library but the Halvorsen violin concerto was separated from the rest of the collection and housed in the library’s performance collection. 

As part of the digital humanities initiative at UTL, Houman Behzadi, Music Collection Development Librarian engaged in discussion with Suzanne Meyers Sawa, Acting Head Librarian of the Music Library to determine good archival collections candidates for the initiative, and it was clear that the Parlow collection was a front-runner. Houman is working on UTL's ongoing project to digitize archival collections, and is now completing the revamped Parlow collection. Suzanne had already begun work on the Parlow collection several years earlier. The idea of the Parlow collection was pitched to Chief Librarian, Larry Alford, and his support for and vision for projects such as this, and the securing of funding, made it possible to address the collection at this point.

Moving forward on the project, Librarian James Mason was reorganizing a vast digital database when he was working in the lower depths of the library basement and came across four records that contained the name Parlow in the performance collection database. Contacting Houman after he thought he might be onto something of interest, James retrieved all related items to go through one by one. It was upon going through these items that the Halvorsen concerto emerged.

“We are delighted that the Halvorsen violin concerto has been found,” says Acting Head Librarian, Suzanne Meyers Sawa. "We are so happy to be a part of the restoration of this work to the repertoire, and we look forward to participating in the symposium next summer where we will hear the piece performed for the first time in more than a century!" Scholars have continued to inquire into the existence of Halvorsen’s violin concerto, and this discovery has made the digitization of this archive all the more significant.

Houman and Suzanne share that successes such as these have been by way of collaborative processes and would also like to recognize the hard work done by work study students from the iSchool, Timothy Perry and Lelland Reed.

Timely release of Library Liaison Institute final report 

Hot off the press is the  final report of the pilot Library Liaison Institute held at Cornell University in June 2015.  Over 50 librarians from Cornell, Columbia and U of T met to consider future models for structuring liaison work, and to discuss ways to measure the impact of liaison work on fulfilling the mission of the university. The report  describes the event in detail and shares observations and recommendations.  
 
The report's release is well timed to UTL's current effort to reimagine faculty engagement and liaison work, which began in 2014 with a series of librarian and faculty focus groups, followed by the external review report in May 2015.  These reports are available at https://librarians.library.utoronto.ca/?p=970.
 
A working group has now been formed to provide advice and guidance to put ideas and recommendations into actions. Thank you to Allison Bell, Angela Henshilwood, Courtney Lundrigan, Dan D'Agostino, Eveline Houtman, and Stephanie Perpick for participating.  
 
You can stay updated on the group's bi-weekly meetings, plans and activities by logging into Confluence and following the Liaison Future Directions space.  Your comments, suggestions and questions are welcomed!

The East Asian Library's December 2015 Newsletter is now available

The latest issue of the EAL Newsletter features engaging articles on topics such as:

  • Speaking Chinese to See the World: The Library as Transnational Network
  • Jack Howard - A Celebration of a Career in Commemoration of his Retirement 
  • U of T Welcomes author Mitsuyo Kakuta
  • Running Man at U of T  

U of T Libraries establishes new Undergraduate Research Prize

The University of Toronto Libraries has recently established the University of Toronto Libraries Undergraduate Research Prize. These prizes (six winners of up to $1000 per prize) will be awarded to current undergraduate students enrolled at the University of Toronto during the 2015-16 academic year. Entry deadline is April 30, 2016.

The Undergraduate Research Prize provides students with the opportunity to:

  • reflect on their information-seeking experience
  • showcase their research to an audience beyond the classroom
  • promote scholarship excellence at the undergraduate level at the University of Toronto

If you know any undergraduate students that have demonstrated effective and innovative use of information sources in their research assignments, please encourage them to apply for this prize.

More information, including how to apply, can be found at: http://go.utlib.ca/libprize 
Please note: a letter of support is also required from the course instructor.

Phone chargers now available for loan at Robarts Library

Starting this week, Robarts Library will offer portable phone chargers (also works for tablets) for loan at the 4th floor Course Reserves Loan Desk.  Laptop security cables will also be available for loan. Over the next couple of months, additional equipment will be added to this new service. Keep an eye out for updates as new equipment is made available for borrowing. 

If you have any questions about the new service, please contact Perry Hall.

Week of December 14 - 18

Drop off your old textbooks at Gerstein and help other students

The U of T Libraries is partnering with Textbooks for Change, a social venture that provides affordable and accessible educational material to students locally and abroad.  Postsecondary textbook donations are either sent to universities in Africa, or sold at a lower price to North American students with the proceeds being used to fund student-led impact initiatives.

Starting on December 15, students can drop off their donations in the Textbooks for Change bin located in the lobby of the Gerstein Library.

Painting donation enriches library collection on art and Chinese Canadian artists

From Left to right: Kathy Chan, Mimi Yeung, Neville Poy, Dickson Wu, Jack Leong, and Stephen Siu, with the just-unveiled painting.

On the morning of December 11, 2015, the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library welcomed around 30 guests to celebrate painter Dickson Wu (伍鐵生) and his generous donation of a Chinese watercolor and ink painting.

A brief ceremony was held, in which remarks were offered by Jack Leong, Director of the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library; Mr. Dickson Wu, the painter and Honorary Life Chairman of the Chinese Brush Art Association of Canada; Mrs. Mimi Yeung (吳美梨), President of the Chinese Brush Art Association of Canada; Kathy Chan, Director of the Hong Kong Economic & Trade Office (Toronto); Dr. Neville Poy; and Stephen Siu, President of the Yee Hong Community Foundation.  After the speeches, the painting was formally unveiled, and guests invited to partake of some light refreshments.

Mr Wu explained his inspiration for the painting:

“It is a mere drop of water that makes me realize that any elaborate system of rivers, waterfalls, cataracts, etc. actually originate from one source of their own.  Then they all flow out in different directions, to follow their destiny.  But being water, it finds its own level and eventually it all flows into the wide, wide ocean.  The deeper philosophy behind this appeals to me: life, by which I mean all forms of life, not just human life, begins and ends in the same way. There is nothing unique about the beginning or the end.  It is the lifespan, the period in between the beginning and the final end, that counts most, and it is worth every while that we should live life to the fullest.”

 With the latest addition to the Library’s art collection through Mr. Wu’s donation, we are continuing to enrich the library’s collection on art and Chinese Canadian artists.

UTL Partners with Textbooks for Change

 

U of T Libraries has partnered with Textbooks for Change, a social venture that provides affordable and accessible educational materials to students both locally and abroad. Through this partnership, a secure donation box will now be placed at Gerstein Library.

Donations from staff and students alike will support the goals of Textbooks for Change, a non-profit which repurposes used textbooks to create social impact and improve the educational landscape for students around the world.

 

This is done by:

  • Donating thousands of post-secondary textbooks to African universities annually.
  • Selling affordable used textbooks to North American students and using proceeds to help fund student-led impact initiatives.
  • Diverting thousands of textbooks from landfills by recycling them efficiently.

For further information

New online learning modules for graduate students launched

Western University, the University of Toronto, and Queen's University are pleased to announce the release of Student2Scholar, a series of 10 self-paced, interactive, openly-available online modules designed for graduate students in the social sciences.

Modules will help students develop their critical thinking, organization, research, and communication skills, enabling them to participate more actively and confidently in their communities of research. The learning experience is intended to be flexible: students may complete the entire series or most relevant modules and activities at point of need. Module design is closely aligned with the Association of College & Research Libraries' Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education and the Ontario Universities Council on Quality Assurance's Graduate Degree Level Expectations.

Visit Student2Scholar or eCampus Contario in the coming weeks. All content has been made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 International License.

Production of the modules was funded in 2014-2015 by the Council of Ontario Universities’ Ontario Online Initiatives Shared Online Course Fund. University of Toronto Chief Librarian, Larry Alford, expressed his thanks for the funding, “We are grateful to the Council of Ontario Universities’ Ontario Online Initiatives for the funding of this project.” He then praised the project saying, “The Student2Scholar online learning modules are a great example of the kind of scalable and sustainable instruction tools that libraries are building to support teaching and learning. Student2Scholar will be able to reach more students than is possible with in-person library instruction.”

If you have any questions about the project, please contact Monique Flaccavento or Jenaya Webb, members of the tri-institutional Student2Scholar development team.

Learn more.

Retirement Party for Carla Hagstrom

On December 4 at the Gallery Grill in Hart House, Carla Hagstrom celebrated her retirement with colleagues and friends, both new and old. During her 35-year career at UTL, Carla worked in Robarts Reference, Cataloguing and ITS departments, and most recently as the Coordinator for Instruction and Periodicals Librarian at Gerstein. During her career at UTL, Carla had the opportunity to travel to Ethiopia several times to provide outreach, mentorship and training with the Toronto Addis Ababa Academic Collaboration (TAAAC) with the Faculty of Medicine. We wish Carla continued success and happiness in her retirement.

    

Week of December 7 - 11

The University of Toronto Archives celebrates its 50th anniversary

On November 10, the University of Toronto Archives held a reception to celebrate its golden anniversary. The event brought together over 125 individuals - archival donors, researchers, University officers, UTL colleagues, and former staff - who have supported the Archives over the years. We were especially honoured that former Chief Librarian Robert Blackburn, who in 1962 first proposed a University Archives, was in attendance. UTL Chief Librarian Larry Alford welcomed guests and provided a history of the University Archives. Dr. Bruce Kidd, Vice-President U of T and Principal UTSC, spoke about the University Archives’ vital role in the academic community and its impact on his students and his own research. And, of course, there were cake and magnets.

The archives officially opened in January 1965 within the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, with Helen Miles as the first University Archivist. When the University Archives moved into the Fisher Rare Book Library in 1972, it had 1,500 metres of materials. Today, the University Archives houses over 11,400 metres of archival records. It is now the largest University archives in Canada. The collection includes: over 300,000 photographs; 39,000 print items; as well as thousands of audio/visual recordings, architectural drawings, and student records. The Archives also has the private papers of more than 1000 individuals and groups affiliated with the University of Toronto such as Harold Innis, Claude Bissell, Ursula Franklin, and C.B. Macpherson, to name a few.

For further information about our history, see Harold Averill’s The University of Toronto Archives: a potted history

For 50th anniversary magnets, come visit us in our reading room on the 4th floor of the Fisher Library and take one for yourself and a friend.

UTL Town Hall builds excitement at half-way mark for "Charting Our Future"

More than 100 colleagues gathered in-person and via webcast for the most recent UTL Town Hall which highlighted some exciting initiatives taking place at UTL. 

Juliya Borie, Liz Ridolfo, and Caitlin Tillman talked about how linked data will impact libraries. They outlined the steps that UTL and our Canadian partners are taking to ensure the high-quality metadata describing our collections are part of the growing web of data. Linked data presents an exciting opportunity, and the team welcomes anyone who has an interest to contact them.

Kyla Everall talked about the Robarts iStaff, an initiative of the Access & Information and Reference & Research Services departments. In their first months in action, the iStaff have had a positive impact on the student experience in Robarts, and have helped improve our understanding of the service needs of users. Kyla and Debbie Green would be delighted to share further information with anyone who has an interest in this service.

As UTL marks the halfway point in “Charting our Future,” the central libraries’ strategic plan, Sian Meikle focused on some key pressure points. Lisa Gayhart and Caitlin Tillman joined the conversation to talk about the impact of the plan, and next steps.  As a living document, Julie Hannaford invited colleagues to continue contributing to the evolution of the plan.

Larry talked about the impact of the falling Canadian dollar, and provided an update on Robarts Common. He also shared that he regularly hears praise about the Libraries, including in his recent meeting with President Gertler, and he offered his sincere thanks to all staff for their contributions in delivering the services on which the University depends.

Food for Fines supports student and local food banks

Thank you to everyone involved in making this year's Food for Fines drive a success!

A few fun facts:

The amount of fines that were waived totaled $2594.75.

The  amount of food collected was:

  • OISE – 57 items

  • Music – 16 items

  • Robarts – 4 library boxes

  • Criminology – 5 cans

  • FIS – 42 items

  • UTM – 1246 items

  • UTSC – 247 items = 6 boxes= 98 kg

The food donated on the downtown campus was collected by the University of Toronto Students' Union. UTM's and UTSC’s collections were donated to local food banks.

Week of November 30 - December 4

U of T Archives welcomes students in the Discovering Indigenous Health History program

Within U of T Archives, students set up at various desks with archival documents; Karen Suurtamm, Archivist assisting 2 students

On Sunday, November 22, the U of T Archives opened its doors to a group of high school students participating in the Discovering Indigenous Health History program. Organized through the Faculty of Medicine, the program is an opportunity for students to work with medical historians in preparing a meaningful and interesting scholarly project related to the local history of Indigenous health. The program consists of a series of monthly workshops running from September 2015 to May 2016. By the end of the project, each student produces a piece of edited writing based on his or her original research that will be showcased at the Indigenous Health Conference: Towards Health and Reconciliation. The U of T Archives was proud to be part of this program, offering a workshop on archival research, and an opportunity for the students to explore some of our holdings relating to Indigenous health history.  It was a fantastic opportunity to introduce a group of young, enthusiastic scholars to the great research potential archives have to offer.

3 students inspect a folder of documents together; female student to the far right immersed in the document she is holding   Group of students at table, poring over boxes of documents in intimate setting

AODA 10th Anniversary Accessibility Champion, Katya Pereyaslavska

AMCTO Award to Kata PereyselayskaCongratulations to Katya Pereyselavska, Scholars Portal’s Accessibility Librarian, who has been named an AODA 10th Anniversary Champion Award recipient. Katya is recognized for her outstanding leadership, passion, and commitment to the promotion and awareness of accessibility, and her encouragement of accessibility and inclusiveness in the community.

The award was presented by AMCTO, with the support of the Government of Ontario, in a ceremony on November 26 at Toronto City Hall in celebration of 10 years of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA).

Katya leads a number of key accessibility initiatives for OCUL and Scholars Portal including the Accessible Content E-Portal (ACE) and OCUL’s Report on Accessible Media (ROAM). She is also an advocate for inclusiveness in libraries and library services across Ontario, Canada, and internationally, through her role as ARL Visiting Program Officer.  

For more information about the award visit the AMCTO website.

Week of November 23 - 27

Paws for a Study Break! Bella the therapy dog returns

Paws for a Study Break is back for the fall exam season!

Photos of Bella the Therapy DogBella, the St. John Ambulance therapy dog, is back to help you relax, take a break and relieve a bit of stress.  

Bella will be visiting on Tuesdays and Thursdays from November 17 - December 17.

Remember to share all your posts on Twitter/Instagram with the tag #BellaAtGerstein !

For the full schedule and updates about Bella's visit, visit:  https://gerstein.library.utoronto.ca/content/bella-therapy-dog-visits

 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Get Inspired by the libraries: U of T Libraries  Annual Report 2015

Cover of the 2015 Annual Report

The 2015 Annual Report is now online.

Innovation and collaboration are behind our efforts to put our Strategic Plan 2013-2018 priorities into action this past year. What have we all been up to? Some highlights are:

  • We developed a new, user-centered library website, informed by user experience research and input from library staff from across our three campuses.
  • Our Digital Preservation Librarian, in partnership with the Thomas Fisher Rare Books Library, used leading-edge digital forensics techniques and tools to provide access to, and preserve, author papers stored on obsolete floppy disks and hardware. 
  • We are also building new educational and technical services to address the challenges of the digital scholarship revolution, including the complex and evolving requirements of research data management.

A limited number of print copies are also available in the Library Administration office. Contact Acting Communications Librarian, Jesse Carliner, to request copies. 

20th anniversary of the Women's Human Rights Resources Programme (WHRR)

Headshot of Susan Barker Headshot of Rebecca Cook Headshot of Oosterveld

On Thursday, November 12, an eager group of students, faculty, and librarians gathered to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Women's Human Rights Resources Programme (WHRR), an event organized by Susan Barker from Bora Laskin Law Library.

The WHRR collects, organizes, and disseminates information on women's human rights law to facilitate research, teaching, and collaboration. The website was created in 1995 by Professor Rebecca Cook and Ann Rae, former Chief Librarian of the Bora Laskin Law Library, and now has a global reach, with individuals from 90 countries visiting the site so far this year.

The forum began with Susan Barker, current manager of the website, who has worked with the WHRR site since its inception. Tracing through the history of the WHRR, Susan concluded her remarks by thanking the many past and current volunteer contributors: students at the Faculty, alumni, community members.

Professor Valerie Oosterveld, Associate Dean at the University of Western Ontario’s Faculty of Law followed, as the forum’s speaker for the evening. Her 1995 bibliography with Professor Cook, A Select Bibliography of Women's Human Rights, was the basis for the WHRR.

Mingling at Wine and Cheese

Professor Oosterveld’s speech, titled, “Women's Human Rights in International Criminal Tribunals: The Real Story”, outlined the kinds of sexual and gender-based crimes that are committed during armed conflict and how proceedings at the international criminal tribunals have uncovered previously misunderstood patterns and motivations for them. She also spoke of the growing acceptance of these crimes as discrete crimes that should and can be prosecuted and not as unfortunate consequences of conflict.

While Professor Oosterveld described the difficulties international criminal courts have in prosecuting sexual and gender-based crimes, she also spoke of the strides these courts have taken in recent years. For example, the International Criminal Court has recently committed to integrating a gender perspective and analysis into all of its work, paying particular attention to sexual and gender-based crimes in line with statutory provisions.

After a lively question and answer period, the forum concluded with a wine and cheese reception.

New Post on U of T Librarians Blog

Putting ourselves in their shoes: What really matters to our community?

"On October 13, thirty library staff members gathered in the Blackburn Room to explore our communities’ needs from their perspective.  The event was structured about the concept of Value Proposition Design, a way for businesses and other organizations to develop service and communication strategies that resonate with their clientele."

Read more about results of the day and takeaways.

Week of November 16 - 20

Petro Jacyk Resource Centre’s Fall 2015 newsletter now available

PJRC update No. 8 (Fall 2015) is chockfull of articles to catch your interest for a late night fall read.

Contents include:

  • Glenn Goluska's Imprimerie Dromadaire: Russian Influences
  • Ventures in East-Central European and Russian Copyright
  • Casting Type or Type Casting

Read more at: http://tinyurl.com/p49xvjy

Week of November 9 - 13

Cherry trees cared for in preparation of Robarts Common construction

In preparation for the construction work, arborists will relocate or replace 32 cherry trees currently on the site. Autumn is the best time to replant the trees, as they are dormant at this time. Seventeen healthy trees will be relocated, while fifteen failed trees will be replaced by trees of equivalent size. Twenty-three of the fifty-five cherry trees will be unaffected by the construction. At the end of construction, there will be the same number of cherry trees on the site.

In the new landscape, the cherry trees will have improved spacing which will benefit their overall health, as they are currently crowded and are competing for space and light. The new landscaping plan will also locate some cherry trees around areas of exterior seating and create an enhanced experience of their blooms.

The local community, the City of Toronto, and the Japanese consulate who originally donated the trees, have been consulted extensively about the plan.

If patrons have additional questions or concerns, or if you receive any media enquiries, please refer them to Acting Communications Librarian, Jesse Carliner.

Project for the Study of Dissidence and Samizdat provides access to rare Soviet materials

Photo: Maiakovsky Square, Moscow, July 26, 2014. Collection of the Research Program “History of Dissidence in the USSR”. (“Memorial” Society). Photo by A. A. Kirziuk. ITS at UTL is pleased to announce the release of the “Project for the Study of Dissidence and Samizdat” (PSDS), a digital collection of rare Soviet samizdat materials by U of T Assistant Professor, Ann Komaromi. The site includes access to the database of Soviet samizdat periodicals, electronic editions of selected samizdat journals, illustrated timelines of dissident movements, and interviews with activists. Professor Komaromi's project seeks to make rare Soviet samizdat materials more widely available, and to provoke questions about the trajectories of groups and individuals within the varied field of Soviet dissidence and nonconformist culture. 

We invite you to browse the site and offer any feedback that you might have: https://samizdatcollections.library.utoronto.ca. This digital collection is part of the library’s Collections U of T repository.

Photo: Maiakovsky Square, Moscow, July 26, 2014. Collection of the Research Program “History of Dissidence in the USSR”. (“Memorial” Society). Photo by A. A. Kirziuk.

Week of November 2 - 6

"Vic in China" online photographic exhibition launched

The "Vic in China" photographic exhibition honours Victoria University graduates who worked as missionaries, educators, and medical practitioners in China from the late 1890s through the 1940s. The photographs have been generously digitized by the families of Victoria alumni. 

The exhibition is a work in progress. We will continue to add to the page as we receive additional photos and stories from families of Victoria graduates who traveled to Szechuan, China as missionaries. We have designed the web site as a scrapbook to allow for such additions.

This has been a significant project for the library, carried out over two years. Librarian Alison Girling contributed diligent and wide-ranging research and curation of the project. Abe Lam, Web and Digitization Specialist, was assisted by librarian Agatha Barc in the design of the site. Grigory Matoussov, a Systems assistant also provided assistance to Abe, and librarian Karen Wishart has given us some much needed guidance in this project. 

The exhibition is available at http://library.vicu.utoronto.ca/exhibitions/vic_in_china/.

Toronto Public Libraries attracts 191 new members through joint UTL & TPL initiative

This year, Robarts Library and the Toronto Public Library undertook a joint initiative to promote TPL card registration and TPL electronic collections. TPL sought to gauge the U of T community's interest in registering for a Toronto Public Library card and in using TPL's electronic leisure reading material. UTL hoped to measure the interest in electronic leisure reading material by the U of T community and promote online English language learning materials to our large number of international students.

A TPL table was created with banners, devices to demonstrate material use, promotional material, a laptop for card registration and TPL staff to discuss collections and devices, set-up on the 2nd floor of Robarts Library for 5 afternoons from October 19th to 23rd.

The result was that 614 in-person contacts were made and 191 TPL cards issued. Contacts were excited to learn they could download material to their devices (unlike electronic material in the UTL collections). It also indicates interest in electronic leisure reading material that is downloadable by students and staff at U of T.

Week of October 26 - 30

Current and aspiring student journal editors gain direction at Student Journal Forum

Presenter at student journal forum, contemplating as she refers to the projection screen Two presenters interact at the podium

On Thursday, October 22, University of Toronto Libraries hosted a Student Journal Forum. This day-long event brought together current and aspiring student journal editors at U of T. The forum was filled with short talks on the journal process, and included presentations from librarians, faculty members, and student journal editors.

Richard Carter, Graeme Slaght, and Mariya Maistrovskaya presented on the peer review process, copyright and open access, and electronic journal publishing with Open Journal System, respectively. Professor Mark Kingwell spoke about his own insights on the editorial process from his experience as a writer, columnist, and editor. Two student journals, University of Toronto Medical Journal and Camera Stylo gave talks on best practices for sustaining journals, and journal production and design. A portion of the afternoon was set aside for current student journal editors to network with their peers, and showcase their own journals through a "show and tell". Loryl MacDonald and Barbara Edwards from the U of T Archives were also present to help journals be properly preserved and archived.

Students who completed the feedback survey stated they were either satisfied or very satisfied with their overall experience at the Forum, and all those surveyed would attend a similar event in the future. Many students said they left the Forum with a lot of great ideas from both the presentations and each other. Students who were thinking about starting a journal were grateful to receive some direction and to be connected with resources and services on how to get started.

Thank you to all those who helped spread the word about the Student Journal Forum, and to Caeleigh Moffat (TALint student, Faculty & Student Engagement) for providing background research for the event.

The interest in and attendance at this event demonstrated the real need for continued library involvement in this area, so we will continue to build on other ways to support and share resources related to student journal publishing. If you have any questions about this initiative, please contact one of the committee members.

UTL Student Journal Forum Committee:

Agatha Barc, Reader Services and Instruction Librarian, Victoria University Library
Heather Buchansky, Student Engagement Librarian, UTL
Mariya Maistrovskaya, Institutional Repositories Librarian, UTL
Graeme Slaght, Copyright Outreach Librarian, UTL

Open for Collaboration: University of Toronto Libraries organizes Alternate Reality Game for Open Access Week 2015

Open Robarts image in black and white, words "Veritas to Enter" streaming from above Robarts towerFrom October 19th to 23rd, the University of Toronto Libraries hosted UofT’s first Alternate Reality Game for Open Access Week 2015. UTL’s Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office collaborated with local writer Mark Foo and artist David Oxley to create a plot and artifacts that would transport players to another reality.  The ARG focuses on a conspiracy theory regarding the staff at Robarts Library, where, according to a group of concerned citizens, there is something strange happening and they want to know what. Players begin by working with this group of investigators as their agent. The group can’t search themselves because they have been banned from Robarts for being disruptive.

As the player becomes more involved in the game, they discover there is actually something amiss. In fact, the Vayika, an ancient, world-spanning group dedicated to spreading and preserving knowledge is operating within UofT.  The Vayika themselves have planted clues for the investigators as a means of recruiting new members to help oppose a third group who seek knowledge as a means of power. Winners of the game can choose to join the Vayika and become protectors of knowledge, join the Kambre as part of the Conspiracy theorist group, or join the Danand as a default if they do neither, a group that seeks to maintain the status quo. 

The game involves a number of departments at UTL including the Media Commons, the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, Course Reserves, and ITS and combined in-person and online elements including websites, puzzles, email addresses, and social media accounts. Players interacted with game masters to progress through the levels and obtain the prize of a 3D printer file of the Vayika or Kambre sigils. Online, there were 47 winners and 20 in-person winners who wrote their names in the Vayika ledger.

The level of interest for the ARG exceeded our expectations, and even more so after being picked up by BoingBoing.com. This promotion resulted in website traffic and individuals playing the game remotely. From Monday to Friday, the Open Robarts website attracted 2,677 visitors from all over the world and 10,552 page views. Players interacted with the game through page comments, direct emails to game masters, and through social media.

Some comments included:

There were some very cool things in Robarts! I found a notebook, a bookmark and a tablet. I am pleased to say that I have gone really deep and become a member of Vayika. I even got a[n] amulet that I can print out! I'll use it to help Kambre in any way that I can.”

“'Knowledge creates power. Power requires responsibility.' Great work, @OpenRobarts. Now to find a 3D printer. #openaccess

@OpenRobarts following the trail online. Nice work to everyone involved. Wish I could be there IRL. Very straightforward and rewarding.”

The Open Robarts ARG will continue until October 30th.

UTARMS sets precedent in university retention schedule for high risk records

The University of Toronto Archives and Records Management services has been working with the University of Toronto’s Office of Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) to develop new records retention schedules for high risk records. A records schedule provides information on how long records must be retained, the reason for their retention (legal, operational, fiscal, or historical), and their final disposition. This month, Records Archivist, Tys Klumpenhouwer, received the final sign off from Environmental Health and Safety on 7 new records retention schedules. Developing the schedules was a 2 year-long process that involved understanding the nuances of legislation pertaining to biohazards, nuclear safety, waste disposal, and other issues relating to the administration of the health and safety, and environmental programs across campus.

 

According to EHS, the U of T is the first Canadian university to have such detailed schedules and these will serve as precedent for other universities. Of course, the Archives had to celebrate the event with a cake.

 

Week of October 19 - 23

University of Toronto Libraries Supports Green Champions

Lisa Gayhart, User Experience Librarian at Robarts, has enlisted to become one of U of T's Green Champions. Part of "It's Greener Here", the on-the-ground outreach face of the Sustainability Office at U of T, the program is engaging more than 1800 people across campus.

And, every one of them has taken the Pledge, committing to reduce their environmental impact.

Being green isn't always easy, that's why the Sustainability Office has created the Green Champions Blog! Here you can connect with key staff, students and faculty from the St. George campus who are blogging about the successes and challenges of living a more sustainable lifestyle - including our very own Lisa. Check out Lisa's blog starting later this week.

 

 


Join the Conversation
Get tips on how to take your actions to the next level and follow the Green Champions' journeys! If you just so happen to get inspired, by following the journey of Green Champions, like Lisa,  create your own pledge, and let us know! Or, apply to be a Green Champion!

Follow along with the U of T Sustainability office:
FacebookTwitter and Instagram, and posting using the hashtag #greeneruoft.

 

Updated Library Resources for Faculty now online

Perhaps you've been looking for the updated Library Resources for Faculty, a valuable resource for librarians at UTL. A fresh edition for 2015-2016 can now be found online, with relevant updates to support our faculty.

Within these pages you will find an abundance of information about how library staff can support research and teaching, whether through classroom visits, the creation of research guides for student assignments or assistance archiving recorded lectures on the Libraries’ media server; securing copyright clearance for course readings through our syllabus service; or help tracking down a difficult-to-find resource.

If you prefer a paper copy, please contact Communications Assistant, Christopher Piché, at commuications.assistant@utoronto.ca.

 

Week of October 12 - 16

UTL Chief Librarian Larry Alford elected president of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL)

Congratulations to Chief Librarian Larry Alford, who began a one-year term as president of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) on Wednesday, October 7, 2015, during the Association’s Fall 2015 Meeting in Washington, DC.

About the Association of Research Libraries

The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) is a nonprofit organization of 124 research libraries in the US and Canada. ARL’s mission is to influence the changing environment of scholarly communication and the public policies that affect research libraries and the diverse communities they serve. ARL pursues this mission by advancing the goals of its member research libraries, providing leadership in public and information policy to the scholarly and higher education communities, fostering the exchange of ideas and expertise, facilitating the emergence of new roles for research libraries, and shaping a future environment that leverages its interests with those of allied organizations. ARL is on the web at http://www.arl.org/.   

Copyright in Canada Conference 2015 draws copyright experts from around the country

On Friday, October 2nd, The Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office, in partnership with the Bora Laskin Law Library, organized a national conference on the state of the nation three years after the Copyright Pentalogy and the Copyright Modernization Act. The conference brought together academics, practitioners, students, and librarians and examined the effects of the Pentalogy and the Act, while serving as a forum for discussion on the future of copyright.

The day’s event was introduced by UTL Chief Librarian Larry Alford, and showcased thought-provoking dialogues about issues such as fair dealing in educational institutions, the future of copyright, and various topics related to Canada’s Copyright Board. Speakers included former Supreme Court Justice, The Honourable Ian Binnie, the Honourable Justice Roger T. Hughes, as well as a diverse set of academics and advocates that featured representatives from SOCAN (The Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada) and Access Copyright. The varying perspectives of speakers and attendees gave a comprehensive view of the current state of copyright in Canada as well as of existing and potential issues that will affect educational institutions, collective agencies, and legislation in the future.

The Copyright in Canada Conference generated significant activity online, specifically on Twitter under the hashtag #CopyCon2015, which trended throughout the day. Particular interest was given to official doodler, Giulia Forsythe, who shared her visualizations of each panel and plenary session on Flickr and Twitter.

The conference was followed by a cocktail reception in the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library. Select items from the Library were put on display for attendees, most notably a copy of the Statute of Anne, the first copyright statute in the Western world.

For those that missed this event, video of the proceedings will be posted online soon. Keep your eyes peeled for notice that the video is available for viewing!

New Public Service Initiative at Robarts Library

Picture of all istaff, wearing blue vests, in front of the Fisher "Peacock"October 9, 2015

Robarts Library Reference & Research Services and Access & Information Departments successfully launched the iStaff, a new public service initiative this past September. Using the roving service model, the iStaff are a group of student library assistants who are deployed throughout the building to assist users with building navigation, book retrieval, basic troubleshooting. The aim of the iStaff is to help transition new library users to experienced users more quickly with less stress. You might have noticed them in the building wearing their identifiable blue vests.

The iStaff got off to a running start helping students in the TCard line up. After that, they have been kept busy orienting new students by giving mini tours of the building. You can often find them stationed near the second floor exit control gates, ready to help users who may have questions or need direction. They are equipped with iPad minis and are able to instant message with their supervisors and other Reference Department Staff. As the semester progresses, iStaff will be more involved in User Experience testing and observation.

When you are visiting Robarts, feel free to introduce yourselves to them so that they may learn more about other services and collections offered on campus.

If you want to know more about the initiative please contact Kyla Everall, Debbie Green or Jesse Carliner.

Week of October 5 - 9

University of Toronto Awarded Grant for Leading Edge Digital Scholarship Initiative

October 5, 2015

The University of Toronto has been awarded a grant of $773,000 USD ($1,034,750 CAD) from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to develop digital tools to support manuscript study. The funding will be used by the University to support a partnership between its library and its Centre for Medieval Studies (CMS) to further develop the widely adopted and award-winning open source digital scholarship platform Omeka, facilitating its increased use in the digital manuscript studies field. The Mellon Foundation’s grant will enable the building of infrastructure and capacity at the University of Toronto Libraries to support digital scholarship, foster further technical and intellectual collaboration between the U of T and other research institutions, and contribute to the community development and adoption of standards-compliant, interoperable, modular digital scholarship tools that are closely informed by scholarly needs.

The thirty-month project will begin in October 2015, and is being led by co-principal investigators Sian Meikle, Director, Information Technology Services, University of Toronto Libraries and Alexandra Gillespie, Associate Professor, English and Medieval Studies, University of Toronto.  This grant application would not have been possible without the essential and substantial contributions made by University of Toronto Libraries staff members Leslie Barnes and Bilal Khalid, and Alexandra Bolintineanu, who holds a CLIR-funded post-doctoral position at the Centre for Medieval Studies. Dr. Gillespie said, “The generous funding that the Mellon Foundation has provided will enable us to assemble, here at the University of Toronto, a team of skilled technologists, scholars, and data specialists to address the needs of humanities researchers. Our focus will be on the development of special digital tools that will enable us to make images of precious medieval manuscripts accessible, open, sustainable and usable to researchers now and in the future.”

The U of T Libraries and CMS will develop these tools in collaboration with Benjamin Albritton (Digital Manuscripts Program Manager, Digital Library Systems and Services, Stanford University Libraries) and the Mirador development team, and Dot Porter (Curator of Digital Research Services, Penn Libraries), and her group at Penn’s Kislak Centre for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Donald Waters, Senior Program Officer for Scholarly Communications at the Mellon Foundation, said, “On full display in this grant is the collaborative spirit that scholars have shown in working with librarians and technologists to build, improve, and use the digital tools and resources needed to enrich the study of the medieval period.”

“We are deeply grateful to the Mellon Foundation for making it possible for us to expand our capabilities to support digital scholarship in Medieval Studies,” said Chief Librarian Larry Alford.  “The University of Toronto Libraries has a 55 year history of building and using leading edge technology tools to support learning and research. We are excited to collaborate with faculty and major research libraries around the world on this innovative project.”

University of Toronto President Meric Gertler remarked, “The Mellon Foundation’s generous grant comes at a pivotal time in the evolution of digital humanities and will support our work of developing new technologies, opening new avenues of research and increasing access to rich research materials. The Mellon award will also enable the University of Toronto to continue a tradition of pioneering global and interdisciplinary partnerships, and our libraries’ leadership in the innovative development and use of information technology to support research.”

UTL proudly opens Taiwan Resource Centre for Chinese Studies

Wednesday, September 23rd marked the opening of the Taiwan Resource Centre for Chinese Studies at the University of Toronto Libraries, a proud moment for UTL as we now host the first Taiwan Resource Centre for Chinese Studies in Canada, joining major research institutions in Europe, Asia, and the United States.

The event was held at the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library, featuring institutional representatives Dr. Tseng Shu-hsien, Director General of the National Central Library of Taiwan; Ambassador Wu Rong-chuan, Director General, Taipei Economic and Cultural Office, Toronto;  Professor Sherry Chen, University Librarian, National Taiwan University Library; Ms. Yu Hsiao-ming, Director of the Special Collections Division, National Central Library (Taiwan), and Ms. Vinitha Gengatharan, Director of International Strategy & Partnerships, Office of the Vice President, University of Toronto. Members of the Department of East Asian Studies and of the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library were also engaged in the event.

The Centre’s mission is to promote international exchanges in Chinese studies, which aligns closely with the libraries’ own strategic objectives to embrace our place in the global community, seek materials from all over the world, and partner with colleagues internationally to deliver outstanding research services.

Through the new Centre, the National Central Library will donate up to 500 volumes to our collection each year, in addition to specialized resources it has developed locally which would otherwise only be accessible to researchers who are able to travel to Taiwan.  One example is a database of digitized historical newspapers published during the Japanese Occupation period.

The event was followed by a Forum on Special Collections in the Digital Age, with presentations ranging from The Evolution of approaches to special collections digitization, 2000 to the present to Digitization of Cultural Heritage: Taiwan Experience. Perspectives were shared on the enduring importance of special collections in this digital age, with a keynote speech from Anne Dondertman, Associate Librarian for Special Collection and Director of the Fisher Library.

Week of September 28 - October 2

Inaugural STAR awards honours library achievements

The first recipients of the inaugural Staff Team Appreciation & Recognition (STAR) awards were honoured at a reception on September 16, 2015. The two awards recognizing Innovation and Ongoing Excellence were designed to pay tribute to the talented library staff and librarians who do great work at UTL.

 

This year, the Innovation award went to the UTL website redesign team, which included the following members: Steve Baroti, Gordon Belray, Christopher Crebolder, Lisa Gayhart, Chul Hee Yoon, Bilal Khalid, Marc Lalonde, Judith Logan, Kathleen Sinnott, Graham Stewart, and Andy Wagner.

 

The Ongoing Excellence award went to the team responsible for making the “Open Doors” event at Fisher Library a great and growing success every year. The team members are: Harold Averill, Pearce Carefoote, Terence Correia, Michael Dalton, Anne Dondertman, Debbie Douglas, Barbara Edwards, David Fernandez, Marnee Gamble, Linda Joy, Tys Klumpenhouwer, Alexandra Kordoski, Ho Lee, Ariel Leutheusser, Loryl MacDonald, Joel Merzetti, Philip Oldfield, Michael Page, Natalya Rattan, Tom Reid, Elizabeth Ridolfo, Eric Schildroth, John Shoesmith, Phillip Souza, Karen Suurtamm, Jennifer Toews, Deborah Whiteman, Lauren Williams, and Christopher Young.

Each winner received an award packet including a recognition message and a star shaped paper weight. Each nominee received a certificate recognizing their innovative and excellent work.  

Congratulations to all the winners! A special thank you and congratulations to all the nominees, who were also recognized at the reception.

The nominated teams were:

Innovation
Migration to One Desk (UTSC)
Syllabus Service & Zero to Low Cost Courses

Ongoing Excellence
UTL Advancement – Development
TRY Conference
Syllabus Service & Zero to Low Cost Courses
Fire, Health & Safety

 

A big thank you to the Fisher Library for hosting our reception this year and to Lesley Falkner for sourcing out the fantastic awards and the lovely star-shaped cookies and cupcakes for the reception. The first STAR Committee would also like to say a big thank you to our committee chair, Julie Hannaford, for her wonderful leadership, organization and collaboration in making the launch of this new award so successful.

Queer Orientation comes to the Libraries - LGBTQ film series gets rollingPoster for LGBTQ Film Series 2015-2016 and movie, Appropriate Behaviour

The University of Toronto Libraries participated in this year’s tri-campus U of T Queer Orientation. Queer Orientation is a series of LGBTQ+ focused events for new and returning students, staff, and faculty.  The libraries hosted a screening on Thursday evening, September 24th, of the frank and hilarious British comedy Appropriate Behaviour in the Media Commons. The screening also served to kick off the second year of the LGBTQ film series that the libraries is hosting.

The LGBTQ Film Series is a monthly educational film series sponsored by U of T Libraries, the Sexual & Gender Diversity Office,and a rotating group of student organizations, campus offices, and university departments. The series showcases films within the U of T Libraries collection that focus on the lives of LGBTQ+ people. Last week’s screening was co-sponsored by the student group Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, and Trans People of the University of Toronto (LGBTOUT), and we had a great turnout of over 50 attendees—the room was filled to capacity. It was a great introduction to the library services, spaces, and collections, showcasing the libraries as a safe, positive space for all members of the LGBTQ+ community.

We have received a lot of positive feedback about the event, and we look forward to the next film screening on Thursday October 15th at 6:30 pm, once again in the Media Commons. We will be screening the avant-garde, semi-documentary Tongues Untied, directed by Marlon Riggs. The screening will be co-sponsored by U of T’s Anti-Racism and Cultural Diversity Office.

Many thanks to the UTL staff members who are teaming together to coordinate the series this year: Rachel Beattie, Jordan Hale, Sara McDowell, and Jesse Carliner.

Special thanks to Maureen Morin for graphic design support for the series.

Week of September 21 - 25

UTL Government Information Librarian Sam-chin Li featured in Maclean's Magazine

A recently published article in Maclean's magazine highlights the efforts of University of Toronto Libraries' Government Information Librarian Sam-chin Li and her colleagues to preserve government information in a time of catastrophic loss of government records and data.

“Protecting Canadians’ access to data is why Sam-Chin Li, a government information librarian at the University of Toronto, worked late into the night with colleagues in February 2013, frantically trying to archive the federal Aboriginal Canada portal before it disappeared on Feb. 12. The decision to kill the site, which had thousands of links to resources for Aboriginal people, had been announced quietly weeks before; the librarians had only days to train with web-harvesting software.”

Read full article

Science Literacy Week is back at U of T!

Coming to a U of T library near you!

U of T Libraries welcomes Science Literacy Week again this year!  Running from September 21-27, 2015,  this year’s theme is Exploration and Innovation.

Now in its 2nd year, Science Literacy Week has grown substantially, with libraries, museums, and universities participating from all over Canada.  Event founder and U of T alum Jesse Hildebrand hopes to continue to inspire wonder and promote engagement with all things science!

Just some of the wide variety of library events on chemistry, biology, ecology, physics, medicine and more include:

  • Displays of rare, early scientific works and interactive demos on 3D printting
  • Film talks, eclipse viewings, nature walks
  • Speed networking with other U of T researchers ...and much more!

Many live events will also be accompanied by in-library displays, and virtual exhibits featuring recommended books, podcasts, and videos.

To register and see more Sci lit Week event details (at U of T libraries and also around the rest of the campus), visit

http://uoft.me/scilit2015

For full information about events and activities across Canada, visit:

http://scienceliteracy.ca/

Week of September 14 - 18

Welcoming new students to the U of T Libraries

Over the past two weeks, librarians and library staff took part in many orientation events across the St. George campus to welcome new students to University of Toronto.

Image of Librarian Nelly Cancilla - she is behind display table with U of T Libraries banner and to her rightA team of 14 librarians and staff from Robarts, Gerstein, and Engineering & Computer Science Libraries welcomed approximately  200 incoming international students taking part in the Centre for International Experience ‘Step Up’ Pre-Orientation with a dedicated library session, including a ‘top library tips’ presentation, and tours of a library related to their subject area.

During Orientation Week, the libraries had a booth at the School of Graduate Studies Info Fair and Graduate Students' Union BBQ to welcome new graduate students, and the always popular UTSU Clubs Fair to say hello to incoming undergraduates. There were also faculty and college orientations that librarians were involved in to introduce students to resources and services directly related to their discipline.

Thank you to all the librarians and staff for volunteering their time helping to inform new students of all the wonderful services and resources that the libraries has to offer during their time at U of T.

Week of August 31 - September 4

IFLA Standing Committee visits UTL for annual meeting

The summer newletter from the IFLA Standing Committee on Library Services to Multicultural Populations features a wonderful recap of the committee's annual meeting, which was held in Toronto in March of this year. Jack Leong of the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library played host and organized a fun-filled three days in Toronto that included some of UTL's unique collections, as well as visits to other gems of the GTA. For full details see the Summer 2015 newsletter.

 

Call for proposals for the eLearning in Libraries Symposium

Have you been working on a special eLearning project at your institution? Do you have an innovative idea you’d love to share with your colleagues? The eLearning Showcase is your chance!
 
The eLearning collective is now accepting proposals for 15 minute presentations that highlight your e-learning projects, innovative ideas, or anything else eLearning related you would like to share. Please submit your session proposal of 250 words using the online proposal submission form no later than Friday October 2, 2015 at 11:59pm. Proposals will be reviewed and selected by Wednesday October 14, 2015.  Registration for the symposium opens on Friday October 16, 2015.
 

The eLearning Collective’s second annual  eLearning In Libraries Symposium will be held on Friday November 13, 2015 at the University of Toronto iSchool.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact Denise Smith (dsmith@mcmaster.ca) and Jennifer Peters (jennifer.peters@senecacollege.ca)

Open Access Week Opportunities

For Open Access Week 2015, running from October 19th to October 25th,  UTL will be hosting an Alternate Reality Game, exploring themes around information, control, and open access.  Created in partnership with artist David Oxley and author Mark Foo, the game will feature virtual and real interactions between the library, librarians, staff, and students.  There are plenty of opportunities for interested library staff to contribute ideas, play characters, or otherwise populate the game world.  If you’re interested in contributing, send an email to bobby.glushko@utoronto.ca.

This doesn’t have to be a big commitment, a few hours can suffice.  Also, we do need people in the weeks leading up to the game, so there is flexibility there as well.

Thank you, and we hope to hear from you!

Bobby Glushko
Head, Scholarly Communications and Copyright

Week of August 24 - 28

Access to the 8th and 14th floors of Robarts Library until October, 2015 via the P1, P2 and P3 elevators

Effective today, access to the 8th and 14th floors, for all library users and staff, is available via the P1, P2, and P3 elevators, until the P5 elevator renovation is complete in October. These stack elevators will stop at Floors 1, 4, 8, 9-13 and 14.

The P4 elevator is still under renovation, so is not in service.

Staff on the 7th floor should continue to use the staff elevator. Any visitors to the 7th floor will also need to use the staff elevator, preferably accompanied by those staff they are visiting.

Access to floors 1 through 5  is via the escalators and stairs only. During the hours that the 4th floor is staffed, there is  elevator access (stack elevators) from the 1st to the 4th floor and vice versa. 

Access to the 2nd through 5th floors, for those using mobility devices, strollers, etc., will require a staff member to accompany them on the staff elevator. Library users will be directed to the Information Desk to have a staff member paged.

Signs are posted on all floors to provide direction to visitors.

 

New location for Library Human Resources

Your human resources team has relocated to the 1st floor of Robarts Library in the former Accessibility Services area. A map with directions to the new offices will be distributed soon.

Week of August 17 - 21

Classic catalogue and request intercampus delivery/hold service updated to look like main library website

Next week, the “classic catalogue” and the request intercampus delivery (ICD)/hold service will receive the same look and feel as the main library website. This update focuses on style only and does not effect functionality, such as searching or renewing items.
 

Updates include:

  • Header and footer
  • Fonts
  • Navigation
  • Colour scheme
You may view an example page of the catalogue and an example page of the ICD service get a sense of upcoming changes. If you have feedback, please direct it to the catalogue email at utl-catalogue@library.utoronto.ca

UTL is now on YouTube

 
University of Toronto Libraries now has a centralized YouTube channel, bringing together customized and accessible ‘how to’ videos specifically for U of T community, as well as curated vendor instruction videos and archival videos (watch how Robarts was constructed in 10 mins!). Feel free to link or embed these videos in your research guides or websites. And remember to subscribe to the University of Toronto Libraries YouTube channel to keep up to date on any new videos added in the future.

 

Questions about the content on the UTL YouTube channel? Please contact Heather Buchansky (heather.buchansky@utoronto.ca)

Week of August 3 - 7

New tool for choosing digital learning objects

Are you gearing up for the fall teaching season? Pondering ways to expand the reach of your IL initiatives? Having trouble deciding between creating or updating your interactive tutorials, libguides or videos?
 
You’re invited to try out a new tool for selecting digital/online learning objects! This is an ongoing collaboration between members of the U of T Libraries’ Instruction in Library Use Committee’s Learning Object Interest Group: https://onesearch.library.utoronto.ca/online-learning-objects
 

Week of July 27 - 31

Bella helps out at Canada Day event

Bella, Gerstein's resident St. John's Ambulance therapy dog, was snapped by her owner Deb while taking part in a St. John's Canada Day event booth. Deb says that Bella may even be able to drive herself to visit everyone at Gerstein! Bella and Deb will return in the fall to provide stress relief to exam-weary students, so stay tuned to find out the dates!

 

 

 

 

 

State of the Libraries and welcome to new staff

On Wednesday, July 15 Chief Librarian Larry Alford gave an inspiring talk about the past year at UTL and welcomed our new staff members, some of whom are pictured below. Thanks to everyone who was able to attend! 

Teaming at UTL

One of the key recommendations from the external liaison report is the need to re-conceptualize how we respond to faculty and student needs. The reviewers suggest using nimble teams that can readily respond to requests as they arise from our various stakeholders. Recently, a small group had to coalesce around university requirements related to the Tri-Council Open Access (OA) policy. They realized that they had formed a cross-departmental, responsive team, just as the report recommended and considered it to be both an excellent experiment and learning opportunity. While there is much discussion that needs to occur related to unpacking all of the recommendations from the report, they feel that this teamwork has lessons to share with everyone. They met recently to debrief and review their progress.

 

The discussion document is posted on a Confluence site. We encourage and welcome you all to post your comments and feedback. If you do not currently have an account on Confluence and would like to view the post and add your thoughts, please contact Reg Matson in ITS who would be glad to set up an account for you: reg.matson@utoronto.ca

Robarts elevator renovation update

As of July 20, 2015, the Robarts Library P1 stacks elevator will be ready for use. The renovation of the public elevators is 60% complete.
 
On July 20, work will begin on the P4 public elevator at the same time as work will commence on the S2 staff/service elevator. These two elevators should be completed by mid-October. At that time, the final two Robarts elevators, P5 and the S1 staff/service elevator, will be addressed. This schedule will see the completion of the Robarts elevators project by the end of January 2016.
 
With the reduction of the staff/service elevators to one, for the period from July 20, 2015 to January 31, 2016, all staff are advised that there will be longer waits for service. The single elevator should not be put on service during week-day hours. For projects or moves requiring the use of the elevator in service mode, staff must make arrangements through Ikee Gibson, Operations and Building Services Officer (ikee.gibson@utoronto.ca).

New web-based version of OCUL Accessibility Information Toolkit

OCUL is pleased to announce the release of a web-based version of OCUL Accessibly Information Toolkit for Libraries:
 
The OCUL Accessibility Information Toolkit for Libraries, previously available as a PDF, is now fully online thanks to the work of the following folks at OCUL/Scholars Portal:
 
Bartek Kawula (web design)
Anika Ervin-Ward (content editor)
Katya Pereyaslavska (content editor)
Sabina Pagotto (content editor)
 
Since its release in 2013 the toolkit, available in French and English, has received a very positive response from OCUL members and others in the library community.  
 
OCUL would also like to acknowledge the continued work of the Toolkit Subgroup in assessing the toolkit practical application across the OCUL community and preparing a series of recommendations with regard to how this tool should continue to be developed and updated in the future.
 
Please view the complete announcement online and if you have any questions or feedback about this toolkit please contact Katya Pereyaslavska:
Phone: 416 946 8616
Email: katya@scholarsportal.info

June 29 - July 10, 2015

Food and fun at the staff appreciation barbeque

On Wednesday July 8 the weather was perfect for the annual staff appreciation barbeque, held under the trees surrounding Robarts Library. Staff from libraries across campus came out to enjoy hamburgers, watermelon, frozen treats, and good company. Thanks to everyone who made this lovely event possible, to everyone who attended, and to those who posed for the pictures below!

 

UTL's Library of Conquest team competes in first dragon boat race

 
On July 1st, Canada Day, the inaugural UTL Dragon Boat team - Library of Conquest - paddled in their first races as part of the Rusty Dragons Canada Day Regatta. They did a fantastic job! After training and practicing for six weeks, they were really in sync as a team – they were in the 'boat zone'!
 
Our intrepid team paddled in two heats and then went through to the Group C final, where they placed second in their group. The weather cooperated and it was a terrific day on Centre Island. Team members brought family members out for the day and it turned into a fun day of socializing and maze exploring in between races.
 
Kudos to Jack Leong for initiating the team and for being a terrific team leader. Thank you to Maureen Morin for designing the team t-shirts – everyone looked very spiffy in their shirts. Thank you also to Stephen Hong for coming over and taking photos and videos of the day. And a very special shout out to Jennifer, who broke her arm at the last practice, but still came out and cheered her team on as the drummer and chief cheerleader on the boat.
 
Way to go, guys!
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Changes to RefWorks as of July 9

UTL’s RefWorks hosting location has changed. Here's what you and your RefWorks users need to know.

All University of Toronto RefWorks accounts migrated from the Scholars Portal Canadian server to RefWorks US servers on July 9, 2015. Following the move, your references, folders, attachments, and shares will remain intact. 

What does this migration mean to you and your RefWorks users?

  • Users’ RefWorks account name may be changed, to make sure that they are unique on the new server. Affected users will receive an email notification, and they will be able to customize their new account name.
  • Users who use Write-N-Cite (now called ProQuest for Word) will need to re-install it following the migration. 
  • ProQuest for Word was updated on staff workstations and library public workstations managed by the Information Commons immediately following the migration on July 9.
  • Users will no longer need a group code to log into RefWorks.
  • Users will have access to a new RefWorks service, Flow. (http://refworks.com/refworks)

RefWorks Migration Support Instructions

  • Please refer to the RefWorks LibGuide for migration support. 
  • For help with the LibGuide or to report any broken links, please contact Christina Santolin through the RefWorks email below.

For LibGuides Authors

  • RefWorks has been migrated to the new log in page:
  • Please update links in your guides. Current links will point to a Scholars Portal page notifying users of the support transition. Links on the main library website and in the library FAQs have been updated.

Other questions? Please let us know at refworks@library.utoronto.ca.

Week of June 15-19

U of T Archives acquires Davidson Black papers

At the Ming tombs, 21 Oct 1920The University Archives recently acquired the papers of eminent Canadian paleoanthropologist Davidson Black (1884-1934). Though he did not teach at U of T, Black maintained close ties with the university throughout his career and the Black family personal papers are also in the University Archives, spanning four generations of the family but with an emphasis on Dr. Black's life, teaching and research. Dr. Black's extensive correspondence, meticulously identified photographs, home movies and teaching files provide an engrossing account of his life, shedding light on the expatriate community in Beijing in the 1920s and early 1930s, and the culture in which it existed. For sample photographs and a link to the finding aid check out the UTARMS website.

Above: At the Ming tombs, 21 Oct 1920

UTL Staff Barbeque 

 

 

Week of June 8-12, 2015

Media Commons cabinets of curiosities

The Media Commons recently acquired some attractive new display cabinets. They plan to rotate displays highlighting their diverse collection in the new space. The first display highlights their collection of DVD box sets and special edition DVDs. This includes everything from cookie cutters and an apron from the A Christmas Story box to a bust of the character Bender from the Futurama special edition. Stop by to stay up-to-date on the current display and see what the Media Commons' unique collection holds!

New Career Community at the University of Toronto

 

Career Community logoThe Organizational Development and Learning Centre (ODLC) recently launched an online community to support staff career development at U of T. The Career Community is a key resource for staff needs, from job applications to networking. It is an innovative, interactive and dynamic online community offering customized career support and information to appointed staff at all levels and stages of careers at U of T. The team at ODLC coordinates and moderates the Career Community, and invites you to take advantage of all it offers you, including:

  • A networking database featuring more than 100 staff at U of T who are willing to meet and talk about their roles and careers.
  • A series of U of T Career Clips featuring a broad range of staff explaining their roles, challenges, skills and qualifications.
  • Access to career development support especially for those seeking help with job applications.
  • Podcasts and webinars providing up to date and specific information on job applications tailored for the U of T environment. This includes sample resumescover lettersinterview resources and the 20 job groupings at U of T.
  • An interactive Community Forum where staff share success stories and strategies that have supported their career development at U of T.
Visit the Career Community at www.careercommunity.utoronto.ca and sign up for the Career Community listserve to receive regular updates and announcements.

Week of May 25-29, 2015

UTL staff inspire with feats of strength and generosity

Staf in front of plane

Group shot

On the morning of Saturday, May 23, Dr. Jack Leong, Director of the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library, led a team of more than 25 library staff, students, community partners and friends to participate in the 2015 Orbis Plane Pull for Sight. Orbis is an organization dedicated to advancing eye health and restoring vision worldwide, and at this event team members combine their strength to pull a 60-tonne Boeing 757 cargo plane for 15 feet in order to raise money. When it was their turn to pull the plane, the team - including Charles Chiu, Stephanie Williams, Merlin Tong, Franky Liu, Owen Ma, Christina Tooulias-Santolin, Richard Hydal, Ashley Wu and others - was able to get the plane moving and past the finish line in only 9.4 seconds!

The team wishes to thank everyone who came out to participate in the plane pull, as well as those who showed their support with donations. They raised $2 874, placing sixth out of 28 teams for fundraising efforts. Congratulations to Dr. Jack Leong and his team!

 

Introducing the S.T.A.R. awards

Introducing two new awards designed to recognize the wonderful work being done by teams across the University of Toronto Libraries, The Staff Team Appreciation and Recognition (S.T.A.R.) Awards, which recognize work and achievements in two different areas: 

The first award is for Excellence in a current, ongoing team. This award is to acknowledge that sometimes the most amazing work is that which is unwavering, consistently excellent and collegial service that many of our teams demonstrate year after year.

The second award is for Innovation and is designed to recognize a team that has been working on a new project, service or other innovation, whether it is large or small.

Please consider nominating your own or another team to bring attention to the exceptional work that is being done across our great libraries.

For details, please see the Terms of Reference for the award, and download the Nomination Form at: http://library.utoronto.ca/star

We look forwarding to reading all of your submissions. The deadline for nominations is June 30, 2015.

Should you have questions, please feel free to email: star.nominations@library.utoronto.ca

The UTL Instagram account is here!

UTL now has an official Instagram account! If you have some content that you’d like to see on Instagram or would like to contribute, email daniela.cancilla@utoronto.ca or jesse.carliner@utoronto.ca

Follow @uoftlibraries for library news, collection curiosities and beautiful photos of our 44 libraries, and help us spread the word by tweeting about it! 

Sample tweets:

Aviators and the Academy exhibition now open at the Fisher Library

The Fisher Library's latest exhibition is now open. Aviators and the Academy: Early Aeronautics in Canada explores how aviation touched the University of Toronto and the city of Toronto in the closing years of the Great War and the 1920s. The exhibition brings together art and archival materials from various sources, including the University Archives and the Fisher Library, to tell the story of how historians have navigated the topic of army co-operation, flight training and post World War One avation.

At face value, this exhibition's materials might appear to tell a simple story from a bygone area. It hinges on aviation in the immediate post-war years, an era of barnstormers, air races and famous aviators. But the early history of Canadian aviation is richer and more diverse than a simple story about aces. It cuts across the first half of Canada's twentieth-century, encompassing our culture, government, private industry and individuals, both civilian and in the military. The material in this exhibition highlights this story.

This exhibition is curated by Jonathan Scotland and Edward Soye. It runs until September 4.

The curators will be conducting a free tour of the exhibition at 6 pm on Thursday June 11. There's no need to sign up - simply come to the Fisher at 6 pm and meet in the main exhibition area.

May 22, 2015

New central library website set to launch on Monday, May 25

 

Contributed by Judith Logan 

On Monday, May 25, the beta website will officially become the new central library website!

Drop by Robarts' second floor conference room from 9am to 2pm on Tuesday, May 26 to chat with the IT web team about the new site.  We'd love to hear what you think.  If you can't make it Tuesday, you can still get involved by sharing your feedback. We will be running usability testing on the new site later in the summer, so stay tuned.

Learn more about the website redesign process on the ITS website.  It took over a year of public consultations, so thank you to everyone who provided their valuable feedback throughout the project! We couldn’t have done it without you.

Life-sized Stanley Cup hologram on display at the U of T Archives this Saturday, May 23 for Doors Open

Image of Stanley Cup Hologram

Contributed by Karen Suurtamm

The U of T Archives is proud to present the first public viewing of the Stanley Cup Hologram in Canada. Visit us on May 23rd, as part of Doors Open Toronto, to see this life-sized hologram of the Stanley Cup.

The Stanley Cup Hologram was created over a two year period from 1978-1980 by Ontario College of Art and Design (Ontario College of Art in 1980) Professor Michael Page, with the assistance of graduate student Cameron Morrison. It was originally displayed in the National Hockey League offices in New York City in 1980.

The hologram captures, in three dimensions, the Stanley Cup as it existed in 1980 - when the National Hockey League had just expanded to 21 teams but was largely dominated by Canadian teams.  In the 20 years previous to the Hologram having been made (1960-1980),  the Montreal Canadians won the Stanley Cup eleven years and the Toronto Maple Leafs took home the cup four times.

The Stanley Cup Hologram is a laser transmission hologram, meaning it is illuminated by laser light passing through the hologram.  Today it is illuminated with a solid state laser. In 1980, a 12 foot long Helium Neon Laser was specially designed and built by Professors Dave May and technician Paul Chen, from the University of Toronto Laser Group. This experimental laser produced more than 350 milliwatts needed to illuminate the hologram. The hologram was truly one-of-a-kind. Measuring 30" x 40", it was one of the largest in the world, produced at a time when holography was still highly experimental.

Michael Page donated one of only two copies of the Stanley Cup hologram to the University of Toronto Archives in 2013. 

About the Artist

Michael studied film, video and photography in the early 70’s. While being mostly self-taught, he attributes his knowledge in the field of visualization to numerous collaborations with other workers from around the world spanning more than three decades.

He is a Professor in the Faculty of Art, and a Visiting Professor at The Institute for Optical Sciences, U of T. Michael is the Principal Investigator at the PHASE Lab at OCAD U, the recipient of several grants which have allowed him and a group of graduate and undergraduate students to investigate interactive, synthetic-reality in various forms. Michael has travelled extensively and exhibited his work around the world.

Michael’s team brings together digital holographic technology with mobile devices. A recently completed NSERC project saw the visualization of electrical activity in the brain in animated digital holographic form.

To learn more about the holography process, watch "Tech Talk - 3D imaging: Digital holography at OCAD".

More on Doors Open

New in the Archives: 19th century photos collected by former U of T President Sir Daniel Wilson

Contributed by Karen Suurtamm

The University of Toronto Archives is pleased to announce our recent acquisition of over 400 nineteenth century stereographs, which were collected by Sir Daniel Wilson, U of T’s president from 1880-1892. Harold Averill, Assistant University Archivist, explains the context of the collection below.

Included in the collection are the two stereographs shown here:

  1. An early, and rare, view of the University Museum at University College, which was destroyed by fire in 1890
  2. A view of the University of Toronto medical building at the University of Toronto 

An early, and rare, view of the University Museum at University College, which was destroyed by fire in 1892.

2.	A view of the University of Toronto medical building at the University of Toronto.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sir Daniel Wilson, who ended his life as President of the University of Toronto, was much more than his title suggested. Early on, his interest in archaeology and in art (he studied under J.M.W. Turner) established him as an authority on ancient Scottish history. After he came to the University of Toronto as chair of English literature and history, he introduced the first courses in ethnology in the British Empire and collected skulls. In his paintings, he created a visual record of his travels and interests.

When Robert Stacey mounted his exhibition, “Sir Daniel Wilson (1816-1892) : Ambidextrous polymath”, in the University of Toronto Art Centre in 2001, he illuminated further the life of this remarkable transplanted Scot who had recently been rescued from comparative obscurity in Elizabeth Hulse’s edited volume (1999), Thinking with both hands: Sir Daniel Wilson in the Old World and the New

Both the catalogue and the book drew on scattered resources in archives, art galleries and museums, but neither provided much information about one of Wilson’s interests – photography – which had recently been unearthed by Les Jones in a shop in Toronto.  What Mr. Jones had found was a collection of over 400 stereographs that, from the handwriting and other evidence, he deduced to have been assembled by Professor Wilson and members of his family. 

This collection, now in the possession of the University of Toronto Archives, is a delightful visual record of Wilson’s interests and the work of some of the photographers of his day. There is no surviving evidence that he himself took photographs, but he regularly requested them from his friends and purchased others from commercial suppliers during his travels.

The collection dates from about 1855 to 1908 and is divided into three broad categories: Europe (Scotland, England, France, and Italy), the United States and Canada, though there are a few images from other places, including Tasmania. His antiquarian interests are reflected in the photographs of old Edinburgh, Chester in England, and in some of the earliest photographs snapped in the Hebrides. He was also interested in the historical building, monuments and streetscapes of cities such Paris, Rome, New York, Washington, Montreal, Ottawa and Toronto (including the University of Toronto and the Toronto Magnetic and Meteorological Observatory). He visited Washington in 1863 and walked out over nearby Civil War battlefields, of which two stereographs have survived. When he travelled through smaller centres he collected as he went; thus, there is a stereograph of the sawmill in Hawkesbury, Canada West. 

Wilson was also interested in the physical landscapes of North America and collected stereographs of such places as the Yosemite Valley in California, the rugged canyons of Colorado, Niagara Falls (mostly of the American side) and Lake Superior along which he had first canoed in the 1850s. The numerous depictions of the White Mountains in New Hampshire were scenes familiar to him from his vacationing there in the 1880s and which he painted for relaxation. Interestingly, there are also images of the Klondike, from 1898 and 1899, which may have been sent to his daughter by George Mercer Dawson, the family friend, scientist and surveyor after whom Dawson City is named.

Week of April 13 - 17, 2015

Sign up for usability testing for beta.library.utoronto.ca, a preview of our new website coming mid-May

Contributed by Lisa Gayhart

If you have 30 free minutes on Tuesday or Thursday next week, consider participating in an in-person usability test at Robarts Library with ITS staff. Together, we'll look at the beta site and test some key functions, mostly focused on the new search results page and Summon's interface update. We'll also have time for you to provide your feedback and ask any questions about the site or the redesign process.

Help us make the new site great and sign up today!

Read more about the beta site, including further ways to get involved. Thanks to everyone who has provided valuable feedback throughout the process. We're getting close!

LibGuides is getting an upgrade! Training sessions available to help you make the move to LibGuides2 

Contributed by Michelle Spence

UTL’s LibGuides will be migrated to the LibGuides2 platform in the next few weeks. This includes updates to the look and feel (it will look very much like the new library website!) and new functionality.

LibGuides2 training sessions

We’ve set up training sessions for LibGuides2 in the April 25 - May 11 window. Anyone who works on LibGuides is welcome to attend, including GSLAs and TALint students.

[register today for training

In addition, there will be a drop-in session on Friday, May 8 in the Gerstein Instruction Lab from 9 am - 4 pm if you want to come by with questions or just have time to work on your guides. No need to register for the drop-in session, just come on by. 

Important dates for the migration:

  • April 24 – All content from the current LibGuides system will be transferred to the Beta Site. Changes to content in the current LibGuides system will not transfer over to the new system after this date.
  • April 25 – May 11 -  Check your content in the Beta site. You can begin to create new guides and build on existing guides in the LibGuides 2 system, but they are not public yet. The current system will remain available to the public
  • May 11 – The Beta system goes live and replaces the current system.

There may be an interruption in service on May 11 as the links are mapped from the old system to the new system in order to go live.

About the new LibGuides layout 

Usability studies (on LibGuides specifically and websites in general) support using the side-navigation option that comes with LibGuides2. This means your guides have a 1-column layout by default.  

  • Usability studies show that this is the best way to set up guides; people do not see tabs and multiple columns are confusing to users. Tabs are also being removed from the UTL website.
  • 3 column layout is overwhelming to the user and it is not clear where he or she should start reading.
  • LibGuide pages will look like the main UTL website, increasing consistency and credibility.
  • Already horizontal navigation at the top of the page
  • A one column layout enables scrolling, taking advantage of how people tend to naturally navigate web pages.

All LibGuides owners should take a look at their guides in the new system before we go live to make sure they are displaying correctly. The new look and feel treats content differently than the tabbed layout we currently use, and some columns in multi-column guides may not display in the public view in the new system (the content will have been transferred, but it will be in a hidden column – moving the content around will allow the content to be visible).

Questions?

Please contact your LibGuides Admins Sarah Forbes and Michelle Spence or the members of the LibGuides2 Working Group: Agatha BarcSusan BarkerDylanne DearbornLisa GayhartEveline HoutmanJudith Logan, and Wendy Traas.

Robarts Library P2 elevator upgrade complete, P1 upgrade to begin soon

The P2 elevator upgrade is now complete, ahead of schedule! Work on the P1 elevator will begin soon.

Elevator Modernization Project Timelines

  • Summer 2015: P1 elevator to be replaced
  • Fall 2015: P4 elevator to be replaced
  • Winter 2016: P5 elevator to be replaced 

UTL dragon boat team update 

Contributed by Jack Leong

After an interesting information session back in November 2014, registration for the UTL dragon boat team reached full capacity with 24 members. We have chosen the team name 'Library of Conquest' and will hold practices from 7-8 pm on the following days: May 21 / 28, June 4 / 11 / 18 / 25. The practice site is Ashbridges Bay, Beaches Lions Club. The race will take place on Wednesday, July 1, at Toronto Island.

It is not too late to join us if you are interested. There may be last minute cancellations and there is always space on other teams that Rusty Dragon administers. You are also welcome to come and cheer for the team during their practices and the race.

For more information:

Contact Jack Leong (jack.leong@utoronto.ca) or visit  http://rustydragons.homestead.com/2015/2015UofT-Libraries.html.

Meet and greet with Neil Romanosky

Contributed by Debra Labern

On April 9, new Associate Chief Librarian for Science Research and Information, Neil Romanosky, hosted an informal meet and greet in the administrative offices at Gerstein. Special thanks goes to Bonnie, Vidya, Renata, Carla and others who planned this event. Staff from the UTL science libraries (Engineering and Computer Science, Dentistry, Earth Sciences and Mathematical Sciences) as well as staff from Robarts, MaRS and the Health Science Information Consortium dropped by to welcome Neil into his new role.

     

From Plant to Pencil: The Illustrated Works of Maria Sibylla Merian display at Gerstein

Contributed by Debra Labern

“Art and nature shall always be wrestling until they eventually conquer one another so that the victory is the same stroke and line: that which is conquered, conquers at the same time.”- Maria Sibylla Merian

This interactive display captures the vision of Student Library Assistant Jaime, a Museum Studies student with an interest in creating an exhibit highlighting 17th century female naturalist Maria Sibylla Merian's work and providing a creative outlet for exam-weary students. Students are encouraged to create their own botanical sketches and pin them up on the display board for all to admire. Come and check out the springtime creations our students have made. One week in, and the sketches keep coming!

More pictures: #gersteinart on Twitter

              

Week of April 6 - 10, 2015

Welcome to our new Associate Chief Librarian for Science Research & Information, Neil Romanosky

On April 6 Neil Romanosky started in his new role as Associate Chief Librarian for Science Research & Information at the University of Toronto Libraries. In this new role, he will lead efforts to provide world class collections and services for the sciences and health sciences, and will also be Director of the Gerstein Science Information Centre

Before becoming a librarian, Neil worked as an editor at Facts On File, Wiley and IEEE Inc. Since becoming a librarian, he has held positions at Columbia University, the National Network of Libraries of Medicine and most recently at the New York University Health Sciences Library where he was Assistant Director, Operations & Department Administrator. He holds a Bachelor of Arts (summa cum laude) in English from Rider University, a Master of Communication and Information Studies from Rutgers University, and a Master of Science in Library and Information Science (with distinction) from Pratt Institute. Additionally, he has completed a Certificate in Human Capital Management, with a focus on organizational development, change management and employment law, from the New York University School of Professional Studies. He is presently an ARL Leadership Fellow in the 2013 – 2015 cohort.

Neil has published and presented on library management issues as well as issues related to collections. Most notably he received the Ida and George Eliot prize from the Medical Library Association, Publication of the Year, in 2014 for the paper by JG Marshall and others: The value of library and information services in patient care: Results of a multisite study.

In his new role, Neil will also oversee operations of the Engineering and Computer Science Library, the Harry R. Abbot Dentistry Library, the Noranda Earth Sciences Library and the Mathematical Sciences Library. Additionally, he manages the relationship with the Health Science Information Consortium of Toronto and the partnership with the MaRS Discovery District, which currently employs three librarians. Neil also has dotted line responsibility for the Aerospace Resource Centre, the Astronomy & Astrophysics Library, the A.D. Allen Chemistry Library, the Physics Library and the Family & Community Medicine Library.

From Plant to Pencil: The Illustrated Works of Maria Sibylla Merian 

Merian Metamorphosis LX “Art and nature shall always be wrestling until they eventually conquer one another so that the victory is the same stroke and line: that which is conquered, conquers at the same time.”

- Maria Sibylla Merian

On April 2, the 17 century naturalist and biology illustrator Maria Sibylla Merian celebrated her 368th birthday. 

From April 10-30, the Gerstein Science Information Centre will shine a spotlight on Merian’s illustrated works with a special display in the lobby:

See

View highlights from Merian’s plant and insect engravings from the groundbreaking Metamorphosis Insectorum Surinamensium and learn about Merian’s impact on naturalist illustration.

Do

Take a creative study break and participate in a fun, interactive display by drawing your own botanical masterpieces and posting them on our mini 'gallery wall' – we’ll provide the plants and pencils, you provide the creative drawings!

Share 

Show off your illustrated masterpieces on social media by snapping pictures of your drawings and tagging them with #gersteinart! We’ll also feature our weekly faves on our Twitter/Instagram/Facebook/Pinterest.   

[Image source: Maria Sibylla Merian [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons]

 Gerstein's digitized historical medical journals included in the Medical Heritage Library

Did you know that you can now browse over 3,000 digitized volumes of historical American medical journals in the Medical Heritage Library (MHL)?

The MHL is a digital curation collaborative among some of the world’s leading medical libraries that promotes free and open access to quality historical resources in medicine.  The items from this recently completed digitization project have been contributed by The College of Physicians of Philadelphia, Columbia University Libraries, Harvard’s Countway Library, and Yale’s Cushing/Whitney Library. The Gerstein Science Information Centre is also pleased to be a contributor to the Medical Heritage Library - click here to explore Gerstein's collections in the MHL. 

Pose with your favourite book for World Book and Copyright Day

What you have to do:

  1. Figure out what your favorite book is.
  2. Get a copy (can be personal copy or library copy – preferably something we have in UTL collections).
  3. Arrange a time to meet with Nelly Cancilla to get your picture taken with your favorite book.
  4. Become famous on Instagram!

If you would like to participate please email Nelly Cancilla to arrange a time/place on campus to meet!

University of Toronto Archives launches new cat-café inspired reading room (for April Fool's Day)

The University of Toronto Archives team had fun on April 1 with this post on their Facebook page:

Want to cuddle a cat while doing primary source research? You’re in luck. On April 1, the University of Toronto Archives let researchers simultaneously fill their needs for feline companionship and archival records.

And, despite a few initial cat fights, purring researchers hailed the change a stroke of genius. The cats have a calming effect and make the reading room feel more like home, according to one anonymous University historian. At the launch, Archives’ readers witnessed cats napping on tables, shuffling paper, and batting pencils. 

University Archives staff find the cats a valuable and welcome addition to their holdings. The cats’ duties include shredding unwanted paper culls and sampling all boxes that enter the University Archives for security problems and comfort levels.

The cat-café inspired reading room runs until the end of April 1, 2015. It is the University Archives’ most recent attempt to update its reading room and has proven more successful than the disastrous 2014 disco-inspired reading room and the lamentable 2012 amusement-park inspired reading room.

Week of March 23 - 27, 2015

World Book and Copyright Day events

University of Toronto Libraries Public Domain Digitization Contest

When: Week of April 20-24

Where: Online, through the social media accounts of the Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office

The University of Libraries’ Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office is holding a contest to digitize and make available a work that has come into the public domain this year.

The intent of the contest is to draw attention to the uniqueness and benefits of the Canadian public domain, through which important scholarly, artistic or literary works can be made available to the public much earlier (50+ years after the death of the creator of a work) than in most other countries, notably than in the US and most of Europe. The contest entrants are a mix of Canadian and international works.

In the vein of CBC’s Canada Reads, each contestant will have a 'champion'. In this case the champion will be a subject expert who will describe the significance of the work.

The contest will run during the week of April 20 to 24, to coincide with World Book & Copyright Day on April 23.

Voting will take place throughout the week on social media. The winning work will be digitized and made available to the public through the University of Toronto Libraries Digital Collections.

The participating contestants will be announced on Monday April 20. Stay tuned for more details to come!

Collaborative and public reading of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

Image of Sherlock Holmes in black silouette with text following, repeated in actual text

Come and celebrate global literacy and authorship by reading a portion of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes aloud in Robarts Library’s 2nd floor lobby at our collaborative and public reading for World Book and Copyright Day on April 23. Time slots are available between 9:45 am - 7:30 pm.

Why Sherlock Holmes?

Sherlock Holmes is universally loved and celebrated, and Doyle’s work was foundational in shaping modern detective fiction, a genre we see in all areas of entertainment. His stories transcend age, background and medium, and have become part of an internationally shared cultural heritage, making this event accessible to all.

Why participate?

World Book and Copyright Day promotes the balance between users’ rights through access to material and authors’ rights through copyright, in both academia and creative writing. The goal of this event is to both promote this balance and to foster a deeper love of literature in the U of T community.

Join Chief Librarian, Larry Alford, Toronto Public Library Arthur Conan Doyle Librarian, Peggy Perdue, and a number of notable authors including Maureen Scott Harris and David Rotenberg, in reading a portion of the text at a designated time throughout the day. The reading will be from 9:00 am to 7:30 pm, or until finished. Please contact copyright@library.utoronto.ca to arrange a 10 minute reading at a time convenient to you.

For more information, visit http://uoft.me/2Gp.   

This event is brought to you by UTL’s Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office and the University of Toronto CAPAL student chapter.

Paws for a Study Break is back for exam season!

Bella, the St. John's Ambulance therapy dog, is back to help you relax, take a break and relieve a bit of stress. Bella will be visiting on Tuesdays and Thursdays from March 31 to April 23.  

Remember to tag all of your tweets/posts/photos with #BellaAtGerstein!

For the full schedule and updates about Bella's visit, visit: https://gerstein.library.utoronto.ca/content/bella-therapy-dog-visits

Bella the Therapy Dog

Week of March 16 - 20, 2015

Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library celebrates grand opening of newly renovated entranceway

Picture of EAL staff behind new main desk
Picture of assistant at new research help desk

Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library staff hosted a celebration today to officially open their new entranceway. Haven't been over yet to check out the renovations? Updated hours can be found here. Come on up to the 8th floor!

Help promote World Book and Copyright Day events at UTL 

Graphic of World Book and Copyright Day, April 23rd

The University of Toronto Libraries’ Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office is calling for library staff to participate in a promotional activity for World Book and Copyright Day. World Book and Copyright Day is an event established by UNESCO with the purpose of celebrating books and the authors who write them, and promoting a love of reading and writing around the world. To celebrate this event, UTL is hosting a public and collaborative reading of Arthur Conan Doyle’s The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. In preparation for the public reading, we are inviting librarians and staff to pose with your favorite book for a promotional series that will be published on various social media accounts. To participate, contact daniela.cancilla@utoronto.ca.

Visit http://uoft.me/2Gp for more information about the collaborative reading on April 23.

UTL's Personal Librarian Program mentioned in new book

Picture of book cover for "The Personal Librarian"

The Personal Librarian, the first comprehensive book about personal librarian programs at academic libraries, was published in 2014. UTL is profiled as a leader in The Future of the Personal Librarian chapter:

"It is easy to see how customer-focused, personalized, trend-setting, unique, and highly tailored traits map to personal librarian goals. The University of Toronto has a very robust three-year personal librarian program and intends to reach out to all 7,000 of their incoming students in the future. They are also leaders when assessing the use and value of their personal librarian program, offering valuable insight for other institutions."

Indeed, in its third year (2014-15), the Personal Librarian program reached one of its original goals in connecting every first-year Faculty of Arts & Science and Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering student on the St. George campus with a librarian. The program also included all incoming OISE graduate students. Find out more about the Personal Librarian Program. If you would like to know more

 about the project and its progress, please contact: Heather Buchansky, Student Engagement Librarian.

Week of March 9 - 13, 2015

350 Years of Scientific Discovery: Philosophical Transactions exhibit at Gerstein

Contributed by Debra Labern

What are U of T students' scientific predictions for the next 350 years? Come and check out Gerstein's 350 Years of Scientific Discovery: Philosophical Transactions exhibit and find out! Thanks to Gerstein librarians Heather and Erica and GSLA Jaime, a graduate student at the Faculty of Information, who put together this lovely exhibit, and to Vincci who supplied these photos.

Audio of Katz Lecture now online

Contributed by John Shoesmith

Did you miss Eli Maclaren's Katz Memorial Lecture? No need to worry since the entire talk was recorded and is now freely available as a downloadable or streaming mp3

Maclaren, Assistant Professor in the English Department at McGill University, spoke on the topic 'Major Contours in the History of the Book in Canada'. As Maclaren sees it, the major contours in the history of the book in Canada can be reduced to five principal developments: the absence of the printing press in New France, the spread of official printing and newspapers across British North America, 19th century U.S. piracy and protectionist copyright that succeeded it, the rise of the Canadian small press in the early 20th century and state sponsorship of the arts in the latter half of the 20th century. He drew parallels among these five developments that have helped to create a 'national literature' in this country.

The full lecture can be heard and downloaded from our Listen to Lecture page, which contains audio of most of the Friends of Fisher lectures since 2011. The lecture can also be heard by clicking on the link below.

Information about joining the Friends of the Fisher can be found here.

  Eli Maclaren - Major Counters in the History of the Book in Canada

Week of March 2 - 6, 2015

On display at the Fisher Library: Celebrating 150 Years of Alice in Wonderland

Picture of Alice from Alice's Adventures on WonderlandThis month the Fisher Library celebrates the 150th anniversary of the publication of Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland in its monthly rotating exhibition. The book, commonly referred to as Alice in Wonderland, was first published in 1865, and has remained one of the most popular children's books of all time. There are over one hundred English-language editions of the book and it has been translated into over 170 languages. It has never been out of print since it was published.

Featured in the top exhibit case is the rare first American edition of Alice and a 1907 gift book edition illustrated by Arthur Rackham. The case also contains material related to the 'real' Lewis Carroll and the girl behind Alice, along with many stunning Alice book covers from the early 1900s.

The books and artefacts on display are from the Joseph Brabant Lewis Carroll Collection, one of the finest Carroll collections in North America. Joseph Brabant built up his collection over 40 years, accumulating over 10,000 items of rare Carrolliana. He generously donated his collection to the Fisher Library in 1997.

This exhibition was curated by Deborah Whiteman, Head of Rare Books and Special Collections at the Fisher Library, and University of Toronto iSchool intern Lauren Williams.

Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library re-opening

The main entrance to the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library on the 8th floor of Robarts Library will re-open this Monday, March 9.

Image of Cheng Yu Tung's new circulation desk

Image of Cheng Yu Tung's new reference desk Image of Cheng Yu Tung's new circulation desk 2


The new space features:

  • Fully redesigned service points including new circulation and reference desks
  • Double the number of public workstations in the open area
  • Expanded and improved workspace for staff
  • Various other enhancements to the library entrance
  • Coming soon! Soft seating and a new digital signage display

Archivists perplexed by UTL cartoons

These two delightful cartoons drawn by a UTL staff member came to the University Archives from Collection Development. Archivists Tys Klumpenhouwer and Harold Averill are trying to identify the “M P” and “J V” responsible for the cartoons. Given the Mad Men style of the clothing, they think the cartoons are from the 1960’s.

If you have any ideas, please let us know.

Second of two hand-drawn pictures of UTL Collections Development department, possibly drawn in the sixties First of two hand-drawn pictures of UTL Collections Development department, possibly drawn in the sixties

Week of February 23 - 27, 2015

Robarts Common update

RobartsCommonModel

Robarts CommonModel3 RobartsCommonModel2

*Architect's rendering of initial design plans

Chief Librarian Larry Alford shares an update about the Robarts Common:

I am delighted to inform you that the University of Toronto Governing Council gave its final approval to the Robarts Common capital project this evening. That approval, the final step in the internal U of T governance process means we can proceed with design development, obtaining necessary city approvals and permits, the preparation of construction drawings and specifications, and construction. Many people have been involved in getting the project to this step and I want to thank everyone involved, but especially my predecessor, Carole Moore. This project is the final step in completing her vision to restore, revitalize and expand Robarts Library as a center for research and learning. I also want to thank Alfred Cheng who has devoted enormous energy to moving the Robarts Common project forward and helping me understand and navigate the university approval process. I want to thank Megan Campbell who has been tireless in her efforts to seek private funds for the project. Again, many others have worked on this project and will continue to work on it, and I thank them all. I will keep you informed as the project moves forward.

An initial rendering of this phase of the project was developed into a 3D model at the iSchool's Semaphore lab (a research cluster at the iSchool dedicated to inclusive design in the area of mobile and pervasive computing - find the Semaphore lab space on the 7th floor of Robarts).

Fun facts about the model:

  • Made of resin that is UV-cured
  • 188 hours total printing time
  • Built mostly by iSchool PhD student Daniel Southwick, with support from Isaac Record, Postdoctoral Fellow and PhD student Gabby Resch, under the direction of Professor Matt Ratto
  • Made on the Objet30 Pro

Paris is Burning screening and panel discussion recognizes 25th anniversary of this classic LGBTQ documentary

Paris is Burning: event posterThis past Tuesday evening (February 24), the U of T Libraries, U of T Department of History and U of T Sexual and Gender Diversity Office co-sponsored a screening and panel discussion of Paris is Burning, the classic LGBTQ documentary about the Harlem drag ball scene in the 1980s, directed by American director Jenny Livingston. The event, coordinated by Robarts Library Reference Librarian, Jesse Carliner, generated a high degree of interest in the U of T and broader Toronto community, including a mention in blogTO which generated so much interest as to require a change in venue from the Media Commons Theatre to Northrop Frye Hall. Nearly 200 people attended. This was the fifth film night in the LGBT film series that UTL has been coordinating and hosting since September.

Paris is Burning was first screened 25 years ago and its enduring impact in LGBTQ theory and culture made it a natural choice for this series. It was also selected based on student feedback and its use in the classroom by the Department of History.   

After the screening, there was a panel discussion moderated by Professor Laurie Bertram, of the History Department, who specializes in histories of gender, material culture, trauma, and memory in Canada and the global North. Professor Bertram teaches an upper level seminar on the history of the sex trade in Canadian and comparative contexts, and uses Paris is Burning in her course.

The panelists included Rinaldo Walcott, Director of the Women and Gender Studies Institute at U of T, and members of Toronto’s ballroom scene: TravoyInTheFlesh (Artist, Community Activist, from the House of Monroe); John Caffery (DJ, Multi-Disciplinary Artist and Community Worker); and SlimThick Monroe, (performer, Youth Activist and Public Speaker).

Image of lecture hall with panelists at front

The panel answered questions from the moderator and also took questions from the audience, leading to a critical discussion about the film that was passionate and sometimes heated.

The photograph used in the event poster is a portrait of Dorian Corey, one of the performers featured in Paris is Burning. It was taken in 1991 in New York City by Michael James O’Brien, who kindly gave us permission to use the photo. Michael James O'Brien is an accomplished American photographer and poet with an extensive career dating to the early 1970’s, and is the Chair of Photography at Savannah College of Art & Design.

If you missed the screening and would like to see or revisit Paris is Burning, the film is available on DVD from the Media Commons and online through Criterion-on-Demand.

For alternate perspectives on the ballroom scene depicted in Paris is Burning, Professor Walcott recommends viewing Tongues Untied and How Do I Look.

Photo details below

Left to right: John Caffery, SlimThick Monroe, TravoyInTheFlesh, Jesse Carliner (UTL), Professor Laurie Bertram (Department of History)
Photo credit: Marcos Armstrong

Fisher Library goes 'on the road' to promote Freedom to Read Week

Contributed by John Shoesmith

In what has become an annual event, librarians from the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library left the building to talk about the issue of challenged, censored and banned books as part of Freedom to Read Week. Librarians Liz Ridolfo and John Shoesmith went to the Etobicoke School of the Arts on Wednesday, February 25, to lead discussions with two separate groups in the school library - a Grade 11 Ancient Civilization class and a Grade 12 Philosophy class - on the history of banned and censored books, and how books continue to be challenged today.

It was a successful visit that generated considerable discussion among the students, leaving them with a greater appreciation of how censorship continues to be an important issue, and how libraries in particular are leading the fight against it.

The Fisher Library also promoted Freedom to Read throughout the week on both its Twitter and Facebook sites.

Organized by the Freedom of Expression Committee and the Book and Periodical Council, Freedom to Read Week is an annual event that encourages Canadians to think about and reaffirm their commitment to intellectual freedom, which is guaranteed them under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

UTL Social Media Best Practices guide available for quick tips and new ideas

Image of various social media site logos

Contributed by Heather Buchansky

A group of librarians involved with social media channels at libraries across UTL created the Social Media Best Practices guide with tips and ideas on how to effectively engage with your library users through Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, etc. Available for download from the Communications LibGuide (under the Style Guides, Logos and Templates tab), the guide outlines best practices for creating and generating content, as well as assessing and maintaining your social media channels. The guide will be updated on an annual basis to ensure it reflects the ever-evolving area of social media.

If you have questions about this guide, or would like to be added to the UTL social media listserv please contact Heather Buchansky.

Week of February 16 - 20, 2015

Robarts Library poses for the camera 

Drone being set up Drone in flight; blue skies Drone taking off

A film crew was on site at Robarts Library today to shoot a National Film Board-funded film which will be shown as part of an exhibition at The Powerplant Gallery and possibly at TIFF. The project, which explores the reciprocal connections between cinema and architectural design, will also include footage of significant buildings in São Paulo and Paris. 

The drone, pictured here, flew up to the 11th floor to capture footage of an actress standing in the St. George apex window. When the film, directed by Canadian artist Mark Lewis, is complete, special effects will make it seem as if the drone flew right through the window and back out again, capturing both the scene inside and the cityscape to the east.

Audio of 'The Lives of Jewish Books' lecture now online

Contributed by John Shoesmith

Last week'sPoster for As it is Written exhibition lecture by David Stern that helped to launch the official opening of the Fisher's current exhibition on one thousand years of Jewish manuscript and print history is now freely available as an mp3 download.

The lecture, "The Lives of Jewish Books," traced the lives of two remarkable Jewish books, both manuscripts from the Middle Ages with extraordinary histories: a Hebrew Bible and a Mahzor (a holiday prayerbook). The talk looked at the books themselves and the people who figured in their pasts. The lecture was sponsored by the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Toronto and the University of Toronto Libraries. Stern is the Moritz and Josephine Berg Professor of Classical Hebrew Literature at the University of Pennsylvania.

The lecture acted as the official launch to the Fisher's current exhibition, "As it is Written": Judaic Treasures from the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library. Curated by Barry Walfish, and drawing primarily on the Fisher's Friedberg Collection, the exhibition features biblical manuscripts, works of Jewish law and liturgy, incunabula, and rare Constantinople imprints, among many other items. Highlights include the manuscript of the Zohar, which belonged to the famous false Messiah Shabbetai Tsevi, and a copy of Maimonides law code, Mishneh Torah, with Sabbatean markings. The exhibition also features contemporary works by Jewish and Israeli artists and bookmakers.  A section devoted to Canadiana features one the earliest Canadian imprints, dating from 1752, as well as the first English translation of the Hebrew prayerbook (1770), among whose sponsors were the Canadian merchant Aaron Hart and his wife. The exhibition runs until May 1, 2015.

A video narrated by the curator, featuring highlights from the exhibition can be viewed on the Fisher Library's YouTube Channel.

U of T Magazine names Gerstein U of T's 2015 Valentine

Gerstein is 's Valentine! MT students ...because "it feels like home!"

Gerstein's mascot Skully, with a tweet from U of T Magazine

It's greener here! Drop off your used writing utensils at Gerstein's entrance.

Used Writing Utensils Drop-off Box

Do you have lots of used pens, pencils, highlighters and markers? Help the U of T Sustainability Office's #greenerUofT initiative by upcycling/recycling these used writing utensils.

Drop them off in our green box, located at the Gerstein Science Information Centre's entrance (left side, just before the gates). Other drop-off locations include:

        •    Robarts Library
        •    UTSU Office
        •    Earth Sciences Building   
        •    Exam Centre
        •    TUGS Office (Sid Smith)

Week of February 9 - 13, 2015

Gerstein feels the spirit of Valentine's Day

Contributed by Debra Labern

In the spirit of Valentine's Day, we asked students what they loved best about the Gerstein library, and here are some of their answers:

     Another whiteboard of students notes on whiteboard under heading "I love Gerstein Library because..."Whiteboard of students notes on whiteboard under heading "I love Gerstein Library because..."

Week of February 2 - 6, 2015

Gerstein 3D printing - now introducing colour

In addition to white, we have just introduced new colours for the two MakerBot Replicator 2 3D printers, available for use by University of Toronto students, staff and faculty: 

  • Black
  • Hot pink
  • Army green

Full details about 3D printing (pricing, services and workshops) 

Gerstein celebrates National Sweater Day

Contributed by Debra Labern

Feb 5 is National Sweater Day: poster

The Gerstein Science Information Centre is a green initiative starter, as noted in U of T's 2013-14 Sustainability Yearbook, and 2015 is proving to be no different.

Gerstein staff and library users celebrated National Sweater Day on February 5 by taking warm and cozy pictures with Skully, our resident skeleton. We invited users to post their pictures to our FacebookInstagram and Twitter pages as well as jot down their best tips for staying warm while saving energy this winter. Thanks to staff members Vincci, Christie and Debra for these pictures. 

Student with Skully, wearing sweater pulled up to nose  Student with Skully, wearing big cowly scarf   Another student with Skully, wearing long, grey sweater   Sign for National Sweater day in background; white board with ideas for energy saving during sweater weather  

Week of January 26 - 30, 2015

Mon Sheong Foundation donates book set to the University of Toronto chronicling the growth of the Foundation and the GTA

To mark the occasion of its 50th anniversary as the first Chinese Canadian registered charity, Mon Sheong Foundation (MSF) has published a souvenir book set which traces the growth of Toronto over the past five decades, developing from a small organization focused on cultural education, to a well-respected, multi-faceted provider of services for youth and seniors across the city.

The book set was presented by the Honourable Dr. Vivienne Poy with Ms. Doris Chan, First-Vice Chair of the Mon Sheong Foundation, to the Richard Charles Lee Canada–Hong Kong Library in a special ceremony this week. The event included a photo exhibition that illustrated Mon Sheong’s role in shaping the GTA community. Among those also present were Valerie Mah and Victor Wong, who are among the early contributors to MSF.

MSF honours UTL with book set - group of 5 Cutting of the ribbon for the photo exhibit - big smiles

The gift of these books to the University of Toronto Libraries will further enrich our collections in this area. The University of Toronto has perhaps the most outstanding collection on Chinese Canadian studies in Eastern Canada, housed primarily in the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library, the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library and the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library.

Mr. Frank Chau, President of Mon Sheong, commented: “The 50th Anniversary Book set represents a half-century of hard work and dedication to providing quality services. It acts as a testimony for the growth of Toronto and its Chinese community over the past five decades, providing great insight for those who are interested in studying the history and culture of Chinese Canadians.” Mon Sheong plans to make the 50th Anniversary book set available to the public through libraries, public institutes and cultural centres.

The event also included the unveiling of a photo exhibition illustrating Mon Sheong’s role in shaping the GTA community. The photo exhibition will remain at the Robarts Library for two weeks for public viewing. It will then travel to other locations in the surrounding municipalities.

Fostering a culture of research at UTL: Lynne Howarth, Study Hall and the Research Interests Group

A small group of librarians have recently formed with the aim of nurturing a research culture among colleagues from across the U of T library system. One way they hope to do this is by hosting events that will take librarians through the research process, including: how to choose a topic, how to negotiate the ethics review, how to apply research methodologies and how to decide where to submit your paper.  A second way is by establishing the first-ever Study Hall for librarians at U of T.

Additionally, the group is working with the iSchool faculty to schedule opportunities for UTL librarians to have their research critiqued. This is an amazing opportunity to get advice on your work from field experts. 

Research Interests Group - still small in number and looking for like-minded colleagues to help foster a strong research community among U of T librarians. If you’d like to join, please contact Dan D’Agostino.

On February 6, iSchool Professor Lynne Howarth will present a talk on her formidable research output. As you know, Professor Howarth’s research has covered an incredible range of interests, and she has just been awarded an ALISE Service Award. A large part of the hour will be available for your questions.

Future events will cover topics such as the nuts-and-bolts of survey creation, negotiating the ethics process, grants and awards, critical analysis of the LIS literature, data analysis and an ethnographic approach to research.

Librarian Study Hall - to supplment event offierings. On alternating Friday mornings, the 4th floor Conference Room at Robarts will be a place where librarians can go to do research, write and share with colleagues.

Check out the Upcoming Events page for further details.

Robarts Library elevator update and changes to stack access via the stairs

Picture of interior of new P3 elevator

We are making solid progress on a major initiative to improve transit throughout Robarts Library in partnership with the university. As you know, all of the elevators in the library will undergo a complete overhaul and upgrade over the next two years. The brand new P3 elevator, the first to be upgraded as part of this project, went into service earlier this month. Work is about to begin on the P2 elevator for completion this term.

While we undertake this work, we are making every effort to ensure library users are able to access the stack floors as efficiently as possible under the circumstances. With this in mind, the P4 elevator was reprogrammed to serve the stack floors and the central stairwell was opened for access to the stack floors in the fall.

Now that elevator service has been improved, access to the stack floors via the central stairwell has been closed to ensure that the stacks are as safe and secure as possible for the U of T community. Transit between floors 9 – 13 is still be possible via the stairs. The situation will be monitored carefully and re-evaluated if necessary.

Week of January 19 - 23, 2015

Meet the Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office team

Get to know the faces behind the Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office at U of T. Over the past week, the librarians and staff who help you with all your scholarly communications‬ and copyright‬ issues have been profiled on the SCCO Facebook page. Do I need a license if I don't charge an admission fee for my on-campus movie night? -- you might wonder. The Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office is here for you, to assist with such questions and quandaries.

The Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office is part of the University of Toronto's continuing effort to provide innovative and forward-thinking services and expertise in copyright and scholarly communications issues, providing a range of services to faculty, staff and students, including copyright consultations, open access publishing assistance and licensing assistance.

Bobby Glushko

Teresa Pietropaolo-
De Marco

Stephanie Orfano

Graeme Slaght

Nelly Cancilla

Picture of Bobby Glushko at his desk Picture of Teresa Pietrolpaolo-De Marco, with Reference Library in background Stephanie Orfano, in red dress Picture of Graeme Slaght Picture of Nelly Cancilla

Scholarly Communications
and Copyright Librarian

Scholarly Communications
and Licensing Specialist

Copyright Outreach Librarian

Copyright Outreach Librarian

Copyright Outreach Librarian

Find out more about the SCCO: 

Twitter: @UofTSCCO
Instagram: UofTCopyright

Help stop campus theft

Image with campus polic logo on left: Stop Campus Theft: Never Leave Your Valuables Unattended

Thefts have been reported in the libraries on the St. George campus. According to the Campus Community Police: 

“Theft is the number one reported crime on campus and an increasingly high percentage of theft is involving property left unattended and in a public space. Thieves walk our buildings carefully waiting for unsuspecting and unassuming individuals to leave their laptops unattended while they quickly step aside to use the washroom or grab some lunch. Then, in seconds, the thief moves in and your laptop is history.” 

- University of Toronto Campus Community Police Monthly Report, August 2014 

Students may not realize how quickly a theft can occur in our busy downtown location. Please help raise awareness of the importance of never leaving valuables unattended in the libraries or other buildings on campus, even for a moment.

Download posters, tabletop tent cards and web graphics for use in your library.

For further information, please contact margaret.wall@utoronto.ca.

Week of January 12 - 16, 2015

2014 Annual Report

HOME | IN REVIEW | COLLECT | INQUIRE | ENGAGE | STEWARD | SPACE | PARTNERS | HIGHLIGHTS

2014 U of T Libraries Annual Report Cover

The 2014 Annual Report is now online. A limited number of print copies are also available in the Library Adminstration office. Contact margaret.wall@utoronto.ca to request copies. 

 

 

 

 

 

Elevator Modernization Project - P3 elevator back in service

The first elevator to be upgraded as part of the Elevator Modernization Project is complete. The brand new P3 elevator is now in service! Work on the P2 elevator will begin at the end of January.

 

UTL safety and security

With the increase in library users during the winter term, it is important that staff are aware of safety and security measures inside the libraries and resources available to students, staff and faculty.

Any suspicious activity should be reported to Security at:

Robarts - 416-946-3590 or via the Information Desk at 416-978-5093
Gerstein - Information Desk at 416-946-5227

All after hours concerns (after 5pm) should be reported to UTL Security and/or Campus Police at 416-978-2222.

The Community Safety Office assists students, staff and faculty with personal safety concerns while on campus. Should you want more information please contact the Office at 416-978-1485 or www.communitysafety.utoronto.ca.

Please feel free to bring any safety or security concerns to Michael Dalton, Manager, Facilities, Security, Fire, Health and Safety - 416-978-1289.

Week of January 5 - 9, 2015

On display: highlights from the University Archives print collection

Contributed by John Shoesmith

This month, Archives print collection imagethe mini exhibition in the Fisher Library's main mezzanine display case features highlights from the University of Toronto Archives' Print Room Collection. Curated by Barbara Edwards, the display is a mere sampling of the University Archives' extensive collection of university publications. These include yearbooks, calendars, annual reports, newsletters, departmental handbooks and student newspapers that date back to 1845. Early calendars, course curricula and student registers are widely used for historical, genealogical purposes; as well, the University's corporate accountability is represented in reports of the Board of Governors and other U of T affiliates. The Archives also has a complete set of Torontonensis, the University yearbook published from 1898 to 1966, Master's theses from 1897 to 1989 and Doctoral theses from 1900 to 1985.

Although the full extent of the University Archives' print material cannot be represented in this display, it is hoped that the selections here will encourage library users to further explore the trajectory of the University community since its conception. By working cooperatively with other permanent campus archives programs devoted to preserving their sponsors' documentary heritage, the University Archives endeavours to document and preserve this university’s great history.

This exhibition will be on display until January 30.

Robarts Library elevator update

The P5 elevator is now back in service. The P3 elevator upgrade is complete and P3 will be put into service as soon as it is inspected (watch for an announcement). Work on the P2 elevator will begin shortly. 

Transit Options at Robarts Library

  • Floors 1-5: P5 elevator, central stairwell or escalators
  • Floor 6: Staff elevators (staff only) or central stairwell
  • Floor 7: P5 elevator or central stairwell
  • Floor 8: P5 elevator or central stairwell
  • Floors 9-13: P1, P2 and P4 elevators or central stairwell
  • Floor 14: P5 elevator

Elevator Modernization Project Timelines

  • Fall 2014: P3 elevator to be replaced (complete, pending inspection)
  • Winter 2015: P2 elevator to be replaced (due to begin shortly)
  • Summer 2015: P1 elevator to be replaced
  • Fall 2015: P4 elevator to be replaced
  • Winter 2016: P5 elevator to be replaced 

Contacts for Service Problems and Complaints

  • Service problems: Notify the Access & Information Department supervisor on duty as well as the Information Desk (416-978-8450).
  • Complaints: Refer complaints to Margaret Wall, Library Administration (416-978-1757, margaret.wall@utoronto.ca). 

Week of December 15 - 19, 2014

Happy Holidays and Best Wishes for the New Year!


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week of December 8 - 12, 2014

Access to Course Materials – Keeping Costs in Check

Contributed by the Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office

(Originally published in the University of Toronto's Online Learning Strategies blog. Republished here with permission.)

Whether on-campus or online, the cost of university courses keeps going up. One of the hidden expenses for students is the cost of course materials, which can run up to $200 dollars per class. Some students have noticed even higher costs this year, partially as a result of U of T’s inability to secure a license with Access Copyright after the expiration of our previous license in 2013. For example, The Varsity recently reported in an article on student fees in the post-access copyright environment that some students had even seen the cost of coursepacks double this semester. Even with the efficiencies gained through digitization of course materials, the price tag is steep.

This got the Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office concerned, because keeping student costs reasonable is an important part of our role here at U of T. So a pilot project, called “Zero to Low Cost Courses,” was established to help.

Through faculty engagement, the Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office is working to help faculty in the creation of zero to low cost courses for students; that is, courses where instructors assign only open access content, public domain content, content used as fair dealing, or content for which the library holds a license. This isn’t a totally new idea - the UCLA Library, under the direction of Dr. Sharon Farb, Associate University Librarian for Collection Management and Scholarly Communication has been running a project in this area for a short time, to great success.

This effort dovetails with other Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office initiatives, such as the Syllabus Service, which works directly with course reserves staff to ensure course reading materials, including digital resources are compliant with Canadian copyright provisions or U of T licensing agreements, and through securing additional licenses as necessary. These efforts are all part of a commitment to serving the research and teaching mission of this institution, and to helping provide the highest quality educational experience to our students at the fairest price.

Data collected through this pilot project will be analyzed for Spring 2015, and will include a feasibility study measuring whether the service could be expanded and implemented as a campus-wide program. The feasibility study will focus on the pilot project’s workflow, and the results of both a before-and -after cost analysis and a faculty questionnaire on resource selection practices.

For questions about these services, or for general inquiries about the Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office, please don’t hesitate to contact us at copyright@library.utoronto.ca.

Brain Break draws 400 students

From December 1-4, the Faculty of Physical Education & Kinesiology's MoveU Crew was on hand at Robarts Library for Brain Break, a series of group fitness activities, massages, yoga and more to help students unwind. 

The event was very successful again this year with over 400 students participating. The students pictured won prizes for their participation in Brain Break activities. 

 

 

 

 

Week of December 1 - 5, 2014

Gerstein receives mention as green initiative starter

Image and text. A large pile of papers reaching past the middle of a scale CN tower. Text of: "Did you know? 3 million sheets of paper saved since our campus libraries set their printers to double-sided defaults in 2010. That's just over half the height of the CN Tower! Credit goes to Gerstein Library, who first piloted paper saving initiatives in 2009!

Gerstein Science Information Centre received mention in the University of Toronto's 2013-14 Sustainability Yearbook!

Check out page 10, where Gerstein is lauded for initiating the double-sided printing pilot in 2009 to save paper on campus!

Changes to stairwell and elevator access to the stacks at Robarts Library

To help alleviate congestion and wait times for the elevators at Robarts Library, the P4 elevator is now serving the stack floors and the central stairwell will be opened for up and down access to floors 1-13. Signage will be posted as soon as the stairs are open. The P5 elevator is now serving the floors previously served by the P4 elevator. Please see below for details.

Transit options through Robarts Library as of Friday, December 5:

  • Central Stairwell: Up and down access to floors 1-13 [pending, watch for signage]
  • P1 and P2: Access to the stack floors (9-13)
  • P3 elevator: Out-of-service for complete overhaul (expected completion, February 2015)
  • P4 elevator: Access to floors 1, 4, 9-13
  • P5 elevator: Access to floors 1-5, 7, 8 and 14

Please continue to put library users in touch with Margaret Wall, Communications Librarian, (416) 978-1757/margaret.wall@utoronto.ca for follow-up on any complaints you receive about the elevators. 

Food for Fines supports the U of T Clothing and Food Bank12 box of food, stacked and sealed close

Thank you to everyone involved in making this year's Food for Fines drive a success!

A few fun facts:

2 mixed boxes of donated food

  • 346 items collected at UTSC (up 30-40% from last year)
  • 1244 items (947lbs) of food collected at UTM
  • 200 items collected at OISE
  • 480 pounds of food collected at Robarts
  • ...and many additional items collected at participating libraries
  • Total fines waived across the library system: $3,531.50 

Visit the Inforum to donate gently-used clothing to the U of T Clothing Bank

Information Services at the iSchool is hosting a Clothing Drive and Food Drive until Friday, December 13.

It's the perfect time to donate to help U of T community members in need. Please drop off any gently-used clean clothing in the bin located at the front of the Inforum. Please have all clothing in loosely tied or untied plastic bags.

Glass display case of hung clothes and articles, like shoes, below. Signage to the light, lower middle, and right about accessing the U of T Clothing and Food Bank Close-up of the left portion of the display case. a baggy sweaer hung over a jean fabric shirt. Signage to the left. Lower middle part of case - beige shoes in front of signage about U of T Clothing Bank

Gerstein honours finalists in Banner Design Challenge

On December 2, Gerstein honoured the top three finalists in the Gerstein Banner Design Challenge. The event was organized by Vincci Lui, Faculty Liaison & Instruction Librarian/Communications & Web Librarian at Gerstein. Bonnie Horne, Interim Director, Science Libraries & Gerstein Science Information Centre, presented each student with a prize. All three finalists had a chance explain their designs and how they approached the challenge. Attendees enjoyed a custom-made cake, showcasing the winning design.

Bonnie Horne and the three finalist  Cake with the winner's design

Here are the top three designs:

First Place Second Place Third Place

First place banner - DNA swirling with clouds and hot air balloon with atomic symbol in middle. The two banners are repeared. At the bottom, one says: "Where knowledge creation happens". The other say, "Space for innovation"

Two colourful banners, in red, blue, yellow, and orange with difference science and library scenes. The letters that spell out Gerstein are circled indivdually and written vertically on one banner. Library is written the same on the other banner.

Varying shades of blue, these two banners have images of space, people talk, a lab and microscope, and a girl, holding a red book in the library

Issey Roquet is a 3rd year international student, doing a double major in Communications (ICCIT program at UTM) and Political Science. She has a strong passion for design, notably visual and digital design, as well as an interest in semiotics and embodied cognition. Thanvin Giridhar is a 3rd year life sciences student. Apart from studying and extracurriculars, he spends his spare time drawing/designing using the Adobe suite or his iPad. Crystal Leung is a 2nd year student, currently studying pharmacology and immunology.

Week of November 24 - 28, 2014

Update: Elevator modernization project for the Robarts and Fisher Libraries

As you know, we are working on a long-term solution to improve transit throughout the Robarts Library complex in partnership with the University. All of the elevators in the Robarts and Thomas Fisher Rare Book libraries will undergo a complete overhaul and upgrade over the next two years.

The elevators will be upgraded one at a time, beginning with the P3 stack elevator, which is currently in progress. Each elevator will be out of service for approximately twelve weeks while the motors, cables, and other mechanisms are replaced.

This week we experienced a mechanical problem with the P1 elevator, which is now back online. Thank you to all staff who worked with our students and other library users at this busy time of year to help manage this unexpected service disruption in a positive manner.

Key dates and details

Fall 2014 – February 2015: The P3 elevator is currently out of service as the first elevator to be addressed in the planned upgrade as detailed above.

Winter 2015: P4 elevator to be upgraded

Summer 2015: P2 elevator to be upgraded

Winter 2016: P1 elevator to be upgraded

To ease congestion in the elevators during this time, we are asking library users to consider using the Stack Stairwells for travel between floors 9-13.

Communicating with library users about the project

While efforts will be made to minimize disruptions, some disruptions will be unavoidable and may be upsetting for users. Feedback also indicates that library users are eager for all of the elevators to be back up and running. Communicating openly about what to expect during this time, including anticipated timelines, and providing opportunities to give feedback and voice concerns will help foster acceptance of the process and minimize stress for our users.

Tips for communicating with users during this time

  • Provide factual information about timelines and project details as described above.
  • If you are asked about access to the stacks via the staircases, please let users know that we are not able to open the stairs for access to the stack floors at this time for reasons of safety and security due to the volume of traffic through the building, both from U of T community members and members of the public.
  • Acknowledge emotions expressed by users – renovations are difficult.
  • Emphasize the positive - the upgrade will greatly improve access to the stack floors of the library on a long-term basis once it is complete.
  • Let users know that we appreciate feedback and welcome questions about the project. Refer questions and complaints to Margaret Wall (416-978-1757) or Lari Langford (416-978-2898).

Communicating a positive message to users about what will be achieved with this vital upgrade, and making them feel that their concerns are being heard, will help build support and foster patience with the process.

Help pick a homepage design for the Libraries beta site - give your input

Contributed by Lisa Gayhart

The library's technology department continues to work on the redesign of www.library.utoronto.ca to make it easier to use and optimized for all screen sizes. Many of you have told us what you like and dislike about the current site, what could be removed and what could be added. At this point, we are looking for more feedback on two drafts of a possible homepage.

Please take a few moments to explore the designs and provide your input via the online tool. Alternately, directly access Design A and Design B and send your feedback via email.

Your ideas will help us build and launch the beta site, coming early 2015. Thank you for your continued involvement in this project. We all look forward to a fresh, new face for the main library website!

For more information about this project, please see the Library Website Redesign page

The Great Gerstein Banner Design Challenge

Contributed by Vincci Lui

And the winner is....U of T student Issey Roquet! Congratulations to Issey on her fantastic designs for the Gerstein Library's new outdoor banners. The Gerstein Library thanks all participants for their creative submissions.

Click here for more about the winning design and finalists.

Celebrate the launch of Gerstein's new outdoor banners with a Hot Cider Study Break!

Tuesday, December 2 | 3:30 - 4:30pm | Information Desk, Gerstein Library

Drop by to warm up with a free cup of hot cider, pick up a souvenir bookmark featuring a banner design by one of our three finalists and see our shiny new banners up close.

Photo Credit: elana's pantry via Compfight cc

 

 

Starbucks to open 24 hours during exams

The Starbucks in the Robarts Library Food Court will be open for extended hours starting December 3: 

Open 24 Hours

Wednesday, December 3 - Friday, December 5 (closes at 11 pm)

Extended Hours

Saturda, December 6: 9 am - 11 pm

Open 24 Hours

Sunday, December 7 – Friday, December 12 (closes at 11 pm) 

Week of November 17-21, 2014

Food for Fines - Support the U of T Food and Clothing Bank

Food for fines and U of T logo combined: U of T Logo about Food for Fines Logo - their logo has a green shopping cart to the left and the wording after of: Food for Fines - Supportthe U of T Food and Clothing Bank

 

 

 



From November 24–28, we will waive $2 of library fines in exchange for a nonperishable food item (maximum $20 waived).

Don’t have any fines? You can still donate!

Most needed items include: baby food, canned fruits, canned fish, plain beans (no sauce), canned vegetables, diapers, juice boxes, sandwich baggies, cleaning supplies, salad dressings and condiments.

Libraries waiving fines for participating libraries and collecting food:
• Chemistry Library
• Criminology Library
• Faculty of Information, Inforum
• Music Library
• OISE Library
• Robarts Library
• UTM Library
• UTSC Library

The U of T Food and Clothing Bank operates year round and is open to all University of Toronto students.

The name of Gerstein's new skeleton is.........SKULLY!

Here are some more names that almost made the cut:

             Slim Shady
Skelly Kelly
Lovely Bones
Dr. Clanks-A-Lot
Dug
Bone Jovi
Mr. Boojangles
U of T student
Sig Sam

Thanks to all who entered and submitted their funny names for consideration!

More fun photos with Skully

This year's TAAAC initiative a success!

On November 17, Gerstein librarians Gail Nichol (Collection Development - Health & Life Sciences/Reference & Instruction) and Carla Hagstrom (Periodicals Librarian- Instruction Coordinator) returned from Addis Ababa, along with Robyn Butcher, of Family & Community Medicine at U of T and Sandra Kendall, Director of the Sidney Liswood Library at Mount Sinai Hospital. They had travelled to Addis Ababa for two weeks in order to teach, mentor and collaborate with faculty and students at the Addis Ababa University Medical School, in partnership with the Toronto Addis Ababa Academic Collaboration (TAAAC).

Toronto Addis Ababa Academic Collaboration (TAAAC)
Toronto Addis Ababa Academic Collaboration (TAAAC)

The mandate of TAAAC is to assist students and faculty at Addis Ababa University in building and strengthening capacity in medical specialities in health and non-health-related professional programs. As a team, Sandra, Gail, Robyn and Carla instructed over 275 clinicians in the use of medical library search skills. Customized sessions were provided as requested to Family Medicine, Orthopedic Surgeons, General Surgeons, Emergency Medicine, ICU Nurses, Internal Medicine, Dentistry and General Nursing students. In addition, a surprise request for the Central Medical Librarians was a session on 'Customer Service for New Staff'. Carla and Gail found the students to be enthusiastic and participatory and, overall, the impromptu session was very well received.

Thank you to Carla and Gail who represented the Gerstein Science Information Centre in Ethiopia and provided high calibre instruction to students and faculty at the Addis Ababa University!

Renovations commence at the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library

The Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library has begun renovations to a portion of its main entrance area including Circulation and Reference services. Work is expected to continue until January 2015.

A temporary library entrance and service points have been set up at Door 8033 (signs are posted). Access to the collections remains unchanged except for a small section of monographs which have been moved to the EAL classroom. Public workstations are still available during construction (LIRA machines are available in CHKL).

After completion of the renovations, you will see:

  • fully redesigned service points, including new circulation and reference desks
  • double the number of public workstations in the open area
  • expanded and improved workspace for staff
  • various other enhancements to the library entrance

There will be some noise during construction and any especially noisy work will be done after hours. 

If there are any questions or concerns about this project, please don’t hesitate to Project Coordinator, Julian Mitchell.

One-stop shopping for UTL staff guides

Links to guides for UTL staff can now be found in the 'Other Staff Guides' tab in the Communications and In the Loop LibGuides:

Other Staff Guides:

  • Library Training for Staff LibGuide
    This guide includes online tutorials, FAQs, and links to other library resources to assist library staff in providing reference services to our users.
  • Cataloguing Resources
    A guide to resources on cataloguing and classification for the University of Toronto Libraries system.
  • Guide for Teaching Librarians
    One-stop shop for UTL's teaching librarians. Not sure how to begin? Need help with lesson planning? Want the advice of seasoned librarian teachers? Look no further.
  • Mentoring Interest Group
    The Mentoring Interest Group started as a way of promoting the existing informal mentoring opportunities available in the U of T Libraries, as well as to gather a group of like-minded people who wish to discuss mentoring issues and develop ways of enhancing mentoring in the libraries.
  • Posters and Presentations
    Tips on creating effective posters and presentations, including templates, suggested tools, and video tutorials.

Week of November 10-14, 2014

Bella the therapy dog is back

Tuesday, November 18 - Thursday, December 18

Bella, the St. John's Ambulance therapy dog, is back to help you relax, take a break and relieve a bit of stress.  Bella will be visiting on Tuesdays and Thursdays from November 18 - December 18.  

Find the full schedule and updates about Bella's visit.

Images of Impact

The Libraries made a submission to the Association of Fundraising Professionals'  Images of Impact showcase, which has been designed to create a growing visual representation of the accomplishment and difference that philanthropy and fundraising makes in, and beyond, Toronto. The images above are now showcased in this on-line collection.

Left: Thanks to donors, the Fisher Library is the primary research centre for General James Wolfe. 

Right: Donors help us build world-class facilities and world-class collections. Photo by Gordon Belray, University of Toronto Libraries

Good Reads

The Future Now: Canada's Libraries, Archives, and Public Memory

The Royal Society of Canada’s Expert Panel on The Future Now: Canada’s Libraries, Archives, and Public Memory is now available.

Since the 1950s debate has raged about the impact of new technologies on print culture in the broadest sense and on the publishing industry, libraries, and archives in particular. Succinctly put, “The Death of the Book” has been both proclaimed and denied. Meanwhile, notions of what constitutes a library or an archive have been challenged and transformed by new communications competencies and needs. In response to these realities, the Royal Society of Canada is establishing an Expert Panel on “The Future Now: Canada's Libraries, Archives, and Public Memory”.

A free copy of the full report is downloadable.

Fall 2014 Petro Jacyk Resource Centre newsletter now online

The latest newsletter from the Petro Jacyk Resource Centre is now available online.

Articles include:

  • The University College Fire of 1890: The Story of a Polish Exile, a Jewish Benefactor, and a Slavist
  • Discovering Slavic Journals in the Periodical Reading Room
  • Ex Libris Friedrich Hitzer: Russian Modernist Books
  • Eastern European Musicology: A Paradox of Paradigms
  • ANNO: Austrian Newspapers Online

Week of November 3-7, 2014

New service: staff picks and new arrivals displays

Stack of colour books to the left, staff picks title to the right, small Richard Charles Lee library below

Beginning mid-November, the Richard Charles Lee Canada-Hong Kong Library is offering a new, monthly Staff Picks and Selected New Arrivals service. What are Staff Picks? Staff Picks are monographs, journals and audiovisual material staff members, including GSLAs and TALint members, recommend from the library’s collection! The displays showcase the depth and range of the library’s collection - topics can range from Hong Kong cinema to Cantonese language learning for non-Chinese speakers.

Want to find out what the themes are in November? Drop by RCL CHKL starting November 16, or check out our website to find out!

For more information, please contact Public Service Librarian, Dawn Wong.

Fisher Library wins Best Library in Now Magazine's annual Reader's Choice poll

Plaque for Best Library, Now Magazine Reader's Poll: Best Library - Thomas Fisher Rare Book LibraryThe Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library is proud to announce that it has won this year's Best Library in Now Magazine's popular, annual Reader's Choice poll. This marks the first time the Fisher Library has been nominated. We will be mounting the plaque by the end of the week, so stop in for a visit.

Thank you to everybody who voted for us. We truly appreciate our patrons and visitors.

 

 

Media Commons announces film streaming service

Contributed by Rachel E. Beattie

Criterion On-Demand Logo -

The Media Commons has some big news! We are now offering a streaming service, through Criterion On-Demand. U of T staff and students (this is key, you must have a valid UTORid to access it) are now able to stream almost 4,000 titles, fiction and documentary films, both on-campus and remotely.

You can browse the Criterion page on our website for a list of titles, but to access the films themselves you must navigate to the catalogue record for the title and go from there. 

 We are very excited about this new service because it will bring wider access to films for the U of T community!

Congratulations to Elena Springall on her new baby girl!

Elena Springall's baby girl, thumb in mouth, eyes closed, with light pink sheets and toque

On November 5, Elena (who you may know as Coordinator, Resource Sharing & Instruction and Liaison Librarian at Gerstein) gave birth to a healthy baby girl, Lucy Springall! Lucy was born at about 5 pm, weighing in at a 8 lbs 15 oz. Mom and baby are both doing well, and resting at home.

 

 

 

Week of October 27-31, 2014

Kapow! Engineering & Computer Science Library has an impact

Contributed by Tracy Zahradnik

This October, the Engineering & Computer Science Library opened their Personal Librarian project to include all first year engineering students. In early October, a Meet & Greet was held for the students, offering them snacks, chances to win gift cards, tours of the library and a chance to talk one-on-one with their own personal librarian.  Over 100 students turned out during the two-hour event. Students were very happy to attend and had many questions about the library and our resources. Some students asked if another Meet & Greet could be hosted in the winter since they had such a great time.

This year, the Engineering & Computer Science Library’s Tracy Zahradnik is coordinating the Personal Librarian project. She used the theme of comic book/superhero librarian to increase the outreach component of the project by tapping into a favourite pastime of some of our students. Upon arrival at the Meet & Greet, each student was given a mini comic book about some need-to-know library facts and other fun tidbits of library information. Tying into the comic book theme, our introductory letter to students also included a comic book video, which was quiet popular and helped to break the ice. 

As the library continues to send out emails to students, a lot of positive feedback has been offered for pointing them in the direction of resources that they might find useful.

Open Access Week goes out and about

Contributed by Nelly Cancilla


Librarians from the University of Toronto's three campuses came together this month to plan the 7th International Open Access Week. The week-long event kicked off on October 20 with student outreach, discussions and social media activity across Twitter, Facebook and Instagram for the purpose of educating the U of T community and beyond about open access and scholarly communications. 

Open access is a movement that works toward getting research online that is available to all without any price and most permissions barriers. 

One of the main activities planned throughout the week at the St. George and UTSC campuses was engaging students in conversations about open access by asking thought-provoking questions such as “If you lost access to all online research today, what would you do/feel?” Staff from the Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office walked around St. George carrying bright orange balloons, the official color for Open Access Week, handing out buttons and talking to passers-by about open access. Posts with pictures of these encounters got very positive responses on social media, particularly on Twitter.

Other highlights throughout the week included film screenings and discussions at UTM, drop-in informational sessions with librarians at both UTSC and St. George, and a policy-making symposium at St. George led by Faculty of Information PhD student, Andrew Hilts. Additionally, social media contests were hosted by the Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office and included trivia challenges on Facebook, a selfie contest where students could tweet or post a selfie of themselves with the Open Access Week team around campus to enter a draw for a Starbucks gift card, as well as two Twitter challenges where students could post about open access for a chance to win a prize. 

If you missed out on these fun activities, visit the SCCO’s social media accounts to view photos and posts about Open Access Week!

Facebook.com/copyrightatuoft

Twitter: @UofTSCCO , @digitalUTSC , @UTMLibrary

Instagram: UofTCopyright

Name the Gerstein skeleton 

Gerstein skeleton holding orange pumpkin pail for votes. To the left is a board describing steps of how to name the skeletonGerstein Library is asking for the U of T community's help in naming our resident skeleton!

Students and staff can simply put their name suggestions into the pumpkin bucket and take a selfie with the skeleton, tagging it on Facebook or Twitter, #GersteinSkeleton.

The winning name will be chosen by Gerstein staff in a few days so be sure to look for an update here!

Week of October 20-24, 2014

Wine & cheese reception for new PhD students and faculty draws a crowd

Wednesday's wine and cheese reception for new PhD students and faculty, held at the Gerstein Science Information Centre, was a great success with approximately 100 attendees.

Hosted by Julie Hannaford, Deputy Chief Librarian and Professor Locke Rowe, Dean, School of Graduate Studies, the event was an opportunity for new PhD students and faculty to meet their liaison librarian and find out how the Libraries can support their teaching and research.

Thank you to all librarians who attended and helped to make the event a success!  

Librarians and students chattingLibrarians and students chatting

Tweet: Very enjoyable reception with @uoftlibraries tonight. More wine and cheese mixers in science libraries please!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Send us your stories for U of T News

The University's Strategic Communications team is always looking for stories about initiatives taking place across the University for the U of T News site and the Bulletin. They are especially interested in stories that address the following themes from President Gertler's installation address:  

  • Entrepreneurship
  • Cities
  • Education
  • Health
  • International
  • Community

Is there something happening at your library that you would like broader exposure for? Contact margaret.wall@utoronto.ca | 416-978-1757. 

UTL's Music Library cranks out the tunes

Contributed by Houman Behzadi 

Bringing retro back with RILM Retro

Launched in 2013 with over 20,000 records, RILM Retrospective Abstracts of Music Literature covers publications that were issued before 1967, the year RILM Abstracts of Music Literature began. RILM Retrospective—or RILM Retro—matches the scope and format of RILM Abstracts of Music Literature, extending its coverage back to the early 19th century. The database is updated every month with a minimum of 350 new records. Journal articles from 1849 to 1966 are being added every month. The bulk of these accessions come from journals whose issues appearing after 1967 are already indexed in RILM AbstractsRILM Retro’s journal coverage is designed to be complementary to RIPM’s coverage.

Bach, anyone? Offering classical music streaming by Medici.tv

Medici tv screenshotMedici.tv is a classical music video streaming resource currently offering over 1,450 titles in categories such as opera, dance, concert, archives, artist portraits, documentaries and educational programmes. In addition, Medici.tv offers 100 live broadcasts of concerts, operas, music festivals and competitions each year.

Quick tip: It is possible to access Medici.tv’s catalogue on your mobile device. If you are an iPhone or iPad user, click here to learn more about Medici’s free app. If you are using an android mobile phone or tablet, click here.

Off-campus access via the apps mentioned requires the installation and use of VPN.

Leisure reading with TPL@UTL

Contributed by Debbie Green

Advertisement: Free Toronto Public Library card registration at Robarts Library, October 6-10

During the week of October 6-10 users of Robarts Library saw an urban partnership in the form of a Toronto Public Library/University of Toronto Libraries initiative to promote electronic leisure reading material to members of the U of T community.

U of T library users lining up to register for Toronto Public Library cards

A table with colourful TPL banners, a large touch screen and various reading devices caught the eye of 227 students and staff, and 207 TPL cards were issued. Interested students were lined up almost an hour prior to the launch of this joint venture which provided the opportunity to test-drive downloadable fiction, magazines and language learning texts as well as register for a TPL library card.

Leisure reading has been shown to improve vocabulary, relieve stress and encourage better writing skills along with many other benefits for students. With so many TPL branches close to U of T the idea of promoting their extensive collection of recreational materials to students, faculty and staff seemed natural to both libraries.

Lest we worry that our students might be neglecting their school work it should be noted that our busiest day was Friday, October 14 which gave the new TPL card holders the long Thanksgiving weekend to spend with relaxing light fiction and popular magazines via Zinio.

This collaboration came one week prior to President Gertler’s launch of his Three Priorities: Discussion Presentation which proposes urban outreach as a key element of the university’s urban strategy. 

Week of October 13 - 17, 2014

Open Access Week - support the movement!

Contibuted by Nelly Cancilla

Open Access Week Banner - U of T Events October 20 to 26 at all campuses - www.library.utoronto.ca/oaweek

Open Access Week is a global event, in its 7th year, that works toward promoting and spreading the word about open access in scholarly publishing and research. Open access is a movement that strives to make scholarly material available to everyone online, and free of cost and restrictions to the reader, promoting accessibility and inclusivity regardless of connection to an academic institution.  

The University of Toronto supports open access in many ways, including through TSpace, an open access repository for our Faculty’s research and work they support. We also want our students and faculty to be aware of the various avenues in publishing so that they can make informed decisions when getting their scholarly work out into the academic community. The Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office here at U of T can help students and faculty make these decisions about publishing their research.

A range of events have been planned to support the event:

 Monday to Friday, October 20-24, 12:00 - 1:30pm | Find us on campus, engaging staff, librarians, and faculty on open access. 
         Should be hard-to-miss, with all the bright orange ballons!
Wednesday, October 22, 12:30 - 2:00 pm | Open Policy-Making Symposium: Open Access and Online Privacy
Friday, October 24, 12:00 - 2:00 pm | Informational Drop-In Session with a Copyright Librarian

Trivia contests all about open access can be found by current U of T students on our Facebook page - students need to follow both our Twitter and Facebook accounts before submitting answers. 

More information and converage of these events, as well as events at UTM and UTSC, can be found throughout the week on our social media accounts. 

Twitter (@UofTSCCO)
Facebook
Instagram (UofTCopyright)

Any questions can be sent to copyright@library.utoronto.ca.

Making history: contributions of faculty members in science and medicine

Contributed by Debra Labern

On October 9, in the Gerstein Reading Room, the scientific accomplishments and contributions of past faculty members were honoured by Gerstein.

Bonnie Horne, Gerstein's Interim Director, worked with Marnee Gambol of the University of Toronto Archives to select photographs that represented the wide range of scientific contributions and discoveries the University of Toronto's faculty members have been involved in. Marnee guided Bonnie in perusing through a diverse range of photographs over several months to settle on the 30 that now adorn the walls of the historic Reading Room in the Gerstein Science Information Centre.

One of the scientists in the photos was present at the ceremony. Calvin Gotlieb's research at the University of Toronto Computer Science department led to the purchase of Canada's first electronic digital machine.
In honour of the 50th anniversary of the department, Chair Sven Dickinson was presented with that  same framed photo that displayed Gotlieb and his colleagues at work.

Poster of event Making History: Contributions of Faculty Members in Science and Medicine - photo of three men in lower part of poster at desk terminal    Framed black and white photo of lady scientis in lab coat - she is in front of a large lab machine   Framed photo of three nurses suround patient. Centred behind them is a large portrait   Black and white framed picture of man at telescope, sitting on ladder - two men are in the background     

Congratulations to Allison Bell on her new baby girl!

Allison's baby girl, swaddled in pink blanket

On October 3, Allison (who you may know as manager of the research & reference unit at Gerstein) gave birth to a healthy baby girl, Alexandra Rose Bell! Alexandra was born at 1:37 pm, weighing in at a 8 lbs 13 oz, and with a full head of dark hair. Mom and baby are both doing well.

 

 

 

Week of October 6 - 10, 2014

Successful Science Literacy Week at U of T!

Contributed by Vincci Lui

Science books piled decoratively in front of science display board on a display table. Balloons surround the board and table. To the left, a white board states, "What does science mean to you?" Responses are written and drawn on the board, below the question.

An older, female patron views a display of books at the event.

A large green, purple, and grey model of the Invisible Ear is displayed with labels to each part of the ear. To the right, on the same table is a paper copy of the Invisible Ear with similar labels

This fall marked the launch of the first-ever Science Literacy Week at the University of Toronto.  From September 22-28, 2014, librarians from all three U of T campuses came together to bring this event to life, through a series of engaging talks, film screenings, book displays, and more.

The brainchild of recent U of T alum Jesse Hildebrand (BSc '14), this year’s theme was Wonder and Skepticism.  A lifelong library-goer, last summer, Hildebrand approached Gerstein librarians to help create an event showcasing “how captivating science really is...to give people the opportunity to marvel at the discoveries and developments of the last few centuries of scientific thought”.  

HiIdebrand’s passion for science communication proved to be infectious, with several libraries eagerly committing to the months-long planning of this extensive event:  Canada Hong Kong Library, East Asian Library, Engineering & Computer Science Library, Thomas Fisher Rare Books Library, Gerstein Science Information Centre, Mathematical Sciences Library, Media Commons Library, New College Library, OISE Library, Robarts Library, UTM Library, and UTSC Library.  Visitors to each of these libraries were able to borrow display books handpicked by faculty, staff, and students; a wide range of topics were covered, including the role of women in science (New College), personalized medicine, evolution or intelligent design, and the wonders of science (Gerstein), engineering in sports (Engineering & Computer Science), the imaginative world of science fiction (Robarts), the controversies of water fluoridation (Dentistry), and new developments in astronomy and in the natural world (UTSC).

Other highlights included Gerstein Library’s popular lecture series, at which over 160 attendees eagerly listened to U of T faculty separate scientific fact from movie-made fiction about dinosaurs, debunk galactic myths and misconceptions about the Big Bang theory, and expose the secret and sometimes scary lives of parasites. The astronomy talk was also followed by a night-sky observation, hosted by the Dunlap Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics.  At the Fisher Library, nearly 100 visitors got the rare chance to leaf through the enthralling pages of early scientific works by Galileo and Euclid, with some even lingering for well over an hour! The UTM Library showed off Biomedical Communication student and faculty projects, including an innovative, ‘invisible’ 3D human ear app, and also partnered with student group, Let’s Talk Science, to carry out interactive live demonstrations for over 300 students, including DNA extraction from a strawberry and creating DIY smartphone microscopes. At UTSC, participants were invited to take the science talk out of the library and into the campus pub during their fun Thursday night #SciLitTO tweet-up. The week-long events were capped off with marathon documentary viewings on the cosmos at the Media Commons Library.

Science Literacy Week also involved several other partners spanning the GTA, with events hosted by the Mississauga Library System, Toronto Public Library, and York University.  Science Literacy Week also landed on the radar of campus and local media, with mentions in The Medium, U of T News, and a recent episode of The Agenda with Steve Paikin.

If you missed out on any of these inspiring events, celebrating all things science, check out these video highlights.  Plans are already underway for next year’s Science Literacy Week, Exploration and Innovation, coming to a U of T library near you!

Introduction to Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL) and Scholars Portal

New to UTL or looking for a refresher on OCUL or Scholars Portal?  We encourage you to watch the webinars below!

Introducing OCUL

This webinar introduces you to the basics about the Ontario Council of University Libraries, who they are, what they do, and how you can get involved. Hear about the OCUL Communities and Standing Committees, how work has been done together as a consortium since 1967, and what OCUL are doing now and in the near future.

OCUL webinar, recorded on September 18, 2014.

Scholars Portal: Who, What, How?

Scholars Portal, a service of the Ontario Council of University Libraries, belongs to all of us! You've probably used RACER, Ask a Librarian, SFX, RefWorks, or Scholars Portal Journals - but what is Scholars Portal? Who works there, and what do they do? How can you stay informed, or even get involved?

Scholars Portal webinar, recorded on September 10, 2014, answers these questions and many more.

(Correction: Scholars Portal Day will be December 3, 2014)

From Scans or Plans: 3D Printing Now Available in the MADLAb at Gerstein!

 
As of October 1st, the Gerstein Science Information Centre has made two MakerBot Replicator 2 3D printers and a MakerBot Digitizer 3D scanner available for use by University of Toronto students, staff, and faculty.

What do I have to do to use the printer?

  1. Become certified to use 3D Printing at Gerstein + MADLab
  2. Reserve time on the printer 
  3. Pay $1.50 for each 1/2-hour reserved on the printer
  4. Get to printing!

Where are the 3D printers located? 

The printers are located in the MADLab (Room B112) on the first floor basement of the Gerstein Science Information Centre.

When can I book time on the printer? 

Printers are available by reservation only. The service will be open Monday to Friday, 9:00 am - 5:00 pm.

Have Questions?

Wonderful! Send them to gerstein.3dprinting@utoronto.ca

Find full details, herehttp://guides.library.utoronto.ca/3Dprinting

Week of September 29 - October 3, 2014

Nominate yourself or a colleague for the new Library Staff Appreciation and Recognition Committee

A message from the Chief Librarian, Larry Alford: 

Dear colleagues, 

Staff excellence is the cornerstone of this great library. It is through your daily efforts that we have built the excellent collections and services that faculty and students, and indeed the world, have come to rely on to support research, teaching and learning. 

To recognize the extraordinary work that you do, I am establishing a “Library Staff Appreciation and Recognition Award.” This award is specifically to recognize the work of library staff, and is separate and complementary to the University’s “Excellence Through Innovation Award.” The initiative is a direct result of feedback received through the strategic planning process and aligns with our strategic goals of:

  • cultivating a positive, transparent and responsive organization able to deliver excellent services that communicate the value of the library and its many outstanding employees;
  • fostering a culture of innovation and experimentation, and encouraging staff to adopt an evidence-based practice;
  • embracing a diversity of ideas, languages and skills that will enhance our ability to deliver excellent services;  and
  • promoting continuous professional growth and learning at all staff levels.

The award winners will be selected by a Library Staff Appreciation and Recognition Committee. Here at UTL we value collaboration; the committee will therefore be tasked with recognizing a notable team accomplishment through this annual award. 

I hope that you will consider nominating yourself or a colleague to serve on this important committee, which will report directly to me. Membership will be broadly representative, and members will be asked to serve for one year terms. In its first year, the committee will be tasked with developing a terms of reference and developing criteria for an annual award. 

If you wish to volunteer, I ask that you please email Anna Santeramo (anna.santeramo@utoronto.ca) by October 10, 2014. Please include in the subject line of the email the following: Library Staff Appreciation and Recognition Committee. 

With best regards,

Larry

InsideOCULA, the newsletter of the Ontario College and University Library Association, is now delivering its content via OLA’s new magazine, Open Shelf!

This is a new move for the InsideOCULA publication and we would appreciate your feedback. You can link directly to the InsideOCULA column here: http://www.open-shelf.ca/columns/insideocula/.

This issue also features a couple of articles by University of Toronto librarians including a Research Spotlight piece by Judith Logan and her co-researcher Sandra Herber (http://www.open-shelf.ca/lis-field-experiences/), and a piece on research and librarianship by Jenaya Webb (http://www.open-shelf.ca/carl-lri-discourse/).

If you have any questions or feedback on the publication, please contact:

Jenaya Webb

InsideOCULA Editor-at-large

jenaya.webb@utoronto.ca

Week of September 22 - 26, 2014

Elevator modernization project: Robarts and Fisher Libraries

We are working on a long-term solution to improve transit throughout the Robarts Library complex in partnership with the University. All of the elevators in the Robarts and Thomas Fisher Rare Book libraries will undergo a complete upgrade over the next two years.

The elevators will be upgraded one at a time, beginning with the P3 stack elevator. Each elevator will be out of service for approximately eight weeks while the motors, cables and other mechanisms are replaced.

Key dates and details

  • Fall 2014: P3 elevator to be replaced. Work began on September 22 for expected completion by mid-November.
  • Winter 2015: P4 and P5 elevators to be replaced.
  • Spring & Summer 2015: P1 and P2 elevators to be replaced.
  • 2016: Staff elevators at Robarts Library, and Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library elevators to be replaced.

The work has been scheduled to improve access to the stacks as a first priority, with replacement of the P3 elevator in the fall, and to minimize the impact to students through the rest of the academic year. To ease congestion in the elevators during this time, we are asking library users to consider using the Stack Stairwells for travel between floors 9-13.

Communicating with library users about the project

While efforts will be made to minimize disruptions, some disruptions will be unavoidable and may be upsetting for users. Feedback also indicates that library users are eager for all of the elevators to be back up and running. Communicating openly about what to expect during this time, including anticipated timelines, and providing opportunities to give feedback and voice concerns will help foster acceptance of the process and minimize stress for our users.

Tips for communicating with users during this time:

  • Provide factual information about timelines and what to expect in terms of noise and space changes.
  • Emphasize the positive - the upgrade will greatly improve access to the stack floors of the library on a long-term basis.Acknowledge emotions expressed by users – renovations are difficult. Avoid introducing personal emotions into the conversation.
  • Let users know that we really appreciate feedback and welcome questions about the project.
  • Refer serious complaints to Margaret Wall (416-978-1757) or Lari Langford (416-978-2898).

Communicating a positive message to users about what will be achieved with this vital upgrade, and making them feel that their concerns are being heard, will help build support and foster patience with the process. 

The Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office is now on social media

The Scholarly Communications and Copyright Office has launched a Facebook page, twitter account and Instagram account. Please visit and like their new channels! 

Week of September 15 - 19, 2014

Celebrating new colleagues and promotions

This past year we welcomed twenty new librarians and celebrated a number of promotions to Permanent Status, Librarian III and Librarian IV. 

The following librarians joined UTL this year: 

  • Kelli Babcock, Information Technology Services                                                                 
  • Leslie Barnes, Information Technology Services
  • Houman Behzadi, Collection Development Department & Music Library
  • Jesse Carliner, Reference and Research Services                                                                            
  • Nicholas Worby, Reference and Research Services
  • Deborah Whiteman, Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library                                                                                                               
  • David Andres Fernandez, Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library                                                 
  • Alexandra Kordoski, Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library
  • Liz Ridolfo, Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library
  • Kirsta Stapelfeldt, UTSC Library                                                                                                  
  • Wendy Traas, UTM Library                                                                                                           
  • Vanessa Kitchen, UTM Library
  • Joanna Bielecki, Pharmacy                                                                                                           
  • Erica Lenton, Gerstein Science Information Centre                                                          
  • Angela Henshilwood, Engineering & Computer Science Library                                   
  • Stephanie Orfano, Scholarly Communications & Copyright Office
  • Daniela Cancilla, Scholarly Communications & Copyright Office
  • Graeme Slaght, Scholarly Communications & Copyright Office
  • Dawn Wong, East Asian Library & Canada Hong Kong Library                                        

The following librarians achieved Permanent Status this year:  

  • Susan Barker, Bora Laskin Law Library
  • John Bolan, Bora Laskin Law Library
  • Maria Buda, Dentistry Library 
  • Bobby Glushko, Scholarly Communications & Copyright Office
  • Paulina Rousseau, U of T Scarborough Library
  • John Shoesmith, Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library
  • Michelle Spence, Engineering & Computer Science Library

The following librarians were promoted to Librarian III this year: 

  • Hyun-Duck Chung, MaRS
  • Christina Kim, MaRS
  • Ravit David, Scholars Portal
  • Klara Maidenberg, Scholars Portal
  • Jacqueline Whyte Appleby, Scholars Portal

The following librarians were promoted to Librarian IV this year: 

  • Sam-Chin Li, Reference & Research Services/Government Publications

Updates to the library catalogue now live

Recent updates to the library catalogue are now live. The changes include:

  • Improvements to the item details page make the author more prominent
  • Improved layout for options list (a.k.a. the “share” button) on the search results page and the item details page
  • Mobile layout improvements
  • Various bug fixes

Please take a look at the catalogue and explore the new options and layout. If you have any questions or comments, please email us at utl-catalogue@library.utoronto.ca.

Questions: 

Lisa Gayhart | Digital Communications Services Librarian| University of Toronto Libraries | Information Technology Services | lisa.gayhart@utoronto.ca| 416-946-0959

Week of September 8-12, 2014

Celebrate Science Literacy Week (Sept 22-28)

Contributed by Vincci Lui

We’re excited to announce the inaugural, student-driven Science Literacy Week: Wonder and Skepticism, Sept 22 - 28. The entire U of T community (and beyond) is invited to participate.

Various week-long events (free lectures, book displays, film screenings, interactive activities, etc.) will be taking place at several University of Toronto Libraries locations across all three U of T campuses, as well as across the GTA at participating university and public libraries. Please feel free to attend and to spread the word to your family and friends!

Science Literacy Week’s partners include the Mississauga Library System, Toronto Public Library, University of Toronto Libraries and York University Libraries, with special thanks to the University of Toronto Science & Engineering Engagement Office for their sponsorship of the Gerstein Library's Lecture Series.

To register and for the full schedule, visit:  http://uoft.me/scienceliteracy   

Excellence Through Innovation Award nomination deadline

Nominated a colleague yet? 

The call for nominations for the 2014 Excellence Through Innovation (ETIA) Award is open until September 24. For more information visit http://uoft.me/etia.  

UTL publications now available via the Communications Libguide

The following brochures and publications are now linked from the Communications Libguide for reference: 

Colour copies of this year's brochures were distributed in late August and more are available. Please contact margaret.wall@utoronto.ca if you require additional copies. 

Week of September 1-5, 2014

Only Canadian-held copy of Shakespeare's First Folio on Display at the Fisher Library

Image of title page of Shakespeare's First FolioContributed by John Shoesmith

This month, as part of the Fisher's rotating monthly highlights utilizing a new display case in the Fisher's main mezzanine, we present a rare opportunity to see one of the most important texts in the English language. Mr. William Shakespeares comedies, histories, & tragedies : published according to the true originall copies, will be on display through September. Only 232 copies of this cultural treasure, better known as Shakespeare’s First Folio, remain in the world today.

Justifiably celebrated as one of the foundational texts in all of English literature, the First Folio was published in 1623 and was the first collected edition of Shakespeare's plays. While half of the plays had been previously published in quarto editions, often with defective texts, the real importance of the First Folio is that it presented in print for the first time eighteen works, including Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra, Twelfth Night, and As You Like It. In total, the First Folio gathered together thirty-six of Shakespeare's plays.

To listen to the Fisher's Director, Anne Dondertman, discussing this important book, one of the treasures of the Fisher Library, please click here. Better still, please come to the Fisher this month to view this significant work for yourself.

Introducing DynaMed, a new point-of-care tool

DynaMed button logo

Contributed by Debra Labern

Answer your clinical questions with Dynamed, our newly-acquired point-of-care tool.

Dynamed is a clinical reference tool  that contains clinically-organized summaries for over 3,000 topics. It is an evidence-based reference intended to answer clinical questions at the point of care for health care professionals. Content is monitored and updated daily, and drawn from over 500 medical journals. More information is available here

To use Dynamed, visit: http://uoft.me/dynamed

Invitation to participate in Strategic Planning working groups

The ACRL Research Planning and Review Committee released its Top trends in academic libraries: A review of the trends and issues affecting academic libraries in higher education earlier this year. You may recall that the previous report was used as the basis for an environmental scan during the strategic planning process. Staff groups reviewed the topics and wrote brief reports to describe important directions related to each trend. That information was used by the steering committee to develop the strategic plan.  

As we approach the end of our first year working with “Charting our Future” we would like to strike working groups again to review, reflect and report on the trends identified in the new report. During the first two weeks of October, each group of volunteer staff will be asked to read -- and optionally, recommend -- several articles in their working group's topic area and discuss the trend with their group. It is anticipated that there will only be one or two meetings of each working group, and each group will determine how best to divide the work between meetings.  The outcome of each group's work will be a one page report identifying important directions in their topic area, and what those directions mean to UTL.  

This year, ACRL identified seven trends with an underlying theme of “deeper collaboration:”

Working Groups Topic Areas:

1.       Data

2.       Device neutral digital services

3.       Evolving openness in higher education

4.       Student success initiatives

5.       Competency-based learning

6.       Altmetrics

7.       Digital humanities

This work is an important part of continuing to engage with the strategic plan, and the reports will help us understand if the plan needs updating to respond to the external environment.  Many staff who participated in the previous round of “trends” working groups have said that they enjoyed meeting and working with people from across the libraries on an interesting and out of routine project.  If you have any questions, or if you would like to volunteer to serve on a working group, please email PlanUTL@utoronto.ca before September 19 and include a ranking of your topic preferences to help best populate each working group according to interests. We really encourage and welcome all interested staff to participate!

New regulation requires all faculty and staff to take occupational health & safety awareness training by September 26

All University of Toronto employees, including senior management, academic administrators, faculty members, managers, supervisors, staff-appointed and casual employees, are now required by law to take basic occupational health and safety awareness training according to a new Ontario regulation that took effect on July 1, 2014.

To meet the requirements of this regulation, U of T's Office of Environmental Health & Safety has developed a basic health and safety awareness training program. This program incorporates the basic training requirements for both workers and supervisors. In order to comply with the regulation, faculty and staff are asked to begin their training session as soon as possible before September 26, 2014.

Click here to start your training and complete the online training module by September 26. (main.its.utoronto.ca/hsa/).

Full details: http://www.hrandequity.utoronto.ca/about-hr-equity/news/2015n/nlrafasttohsat.htm#sthash.ImYbYhjs.dpuf

Week of August 25-29, 2014

Free Microsoft Office for students available September 2

The Microsoft Student Advantage licence, which allows students to install Office ProPlus on up to 5 computers (PC and Mac) and also on up to 5 mobile devices (Android and iOS), is scheduled to be activated on Tuesday, September 2, 2014.

Office ProPlus includes the following products: Word, Excel, PowerPoint (all platforms); Outlook (Mac and Windows only); OneNote, Access, Publisher, Lync, InfoPath (Windows only).

The Help Desk recommends that students only install Office 365 ProPlus if they don’t already have a copy of Microsoft Office on their computer. These products are available while the student is actively enrolled at U of T. Once the affiliation ceases, they will no longer have access to the software.

For more information, see the articles on the Help Desk Knowledge Base at http://help.ic.utoronto.ca/solution_id_1966.html.

Library website redesign 

ITS is currently working toward redesigning the library’s main website: www.library.utoronto.ca. Over the past few months, we have been reaching out to various areas of the library and University community, as well as conducting supporting research, to better understand what our wide array of library users want and need in a library website. From this research, we have produced two draft designs.

ITS wants your input (by September 12):

  • What do you like/dislike? Why?
  • Do you feel information is well organized? What would you change?
  • How do you feel about the layout? Design? Colours? Icons?

View the draft designs at the links below and provide your comments via the feedback button:

Please share these designs with anyone who may be interested. You can read more about the project on the ITS website.

Thank you to everyone who has participated in the process thus far. We’re not done! More opportunities for input and engagement are coming over the fall term.

A guide to ACORN for staff and faculty

The University is currently engaged in a large multi-year program (Next Generation Student Information Services - NGSIS) to replace its existing student information systems with current technologies that provide a superior user experience for both students and the University’s administrative staff.

To ensure that student-facing service staff are well equipped to answer questions about ACORN, the new Student Web Service under development, the University has released an information kit for staff and faculty. The initial release of ACORN is planned for late 2014/early 2015 and will replace the current ROSI-SWS system. 

[download the ACORN Information Kit]

Follow U of T's LinkedIn page

The Vesalius at 500 exhibit at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library was recently promoted via U of T’s LinkedIn Company page. Follow the page to see future posts and share them with your networks! 

 

Week of August 18-22, 2014

The Green Beet opened on August 25 

Contributed by Debra Labern

The Green Beet, located in the lower level of the Gerstein Science Information Centre, will be open to the public on August 25, 2014!

From http://ueat.utoronto.ca/locations/green-beet/:

Green Beet Logo

The Green Beet is U of T’s first exclusively vegan and vegetarian restaurant on campus. Located in the Gerstein Science Information Center, the Green Beet is committed to using  local Ontario produce. The menu has a wide variety of healthy soups, salads, snacks, grab-and-go meals, hot entrees, and desserts. The Green Beet is proud to serve Marley Coffee, which is sustainably grown, as well as a variety of hot and cold beverages. The Green Beet is committed to sustainability, and operates a comprehensive recycling and composting system to minimize waste. Students with UeaT meal plans can use their flex dollars on Green Beet purchases. Enjoy all of the healthy, delicious options the Green Beet has to offer!

Address:

Gerstein Sci