Skip to main content
Banner Image

CCT320H5: Communication, Technology, and Social Change

Defining an Annotated Bibliography

 "A annotated bibliography adds descriptive and evaluative comments (i.e., an annotation), (to a citation) assessing the nature and value of the cited works. The addition of commentary provides the future reader or researcher essential critical information and a foundation for further research."*

From "Write a Annotated Bibliography" a LibGuide available at UC Santa Cruz Library. Content available via the Creative Commons Licence.

 

Why do a Annotated Bibliography?

Putting together an Annotated Bibliography will help you....

  • scope out and assess the quality of one's own research
  • review current and past literature on a particular topic
  • provide the reader with alternative sources
  • allow the reader to confirm if a particular source was consulted
  • illustrate different types of resources about a topic
  • set the topic in a historical context

 *Modified from  "Write an Annotated Bibliography" a LibGuide available at UC Santa Cruz Library. Content available via the Creative Commons Licence

How to do a Annotated Bibliography?

1. Topic formulation. What is the scope of this topic?

2. Search and retriev. Can you find material relevent to the topic?

3. Evaluation of material gathered. What are your findings and impressions of each item?

4. Select your final list of sources and provide a full citation of each. What citation style will you be using? BE CONSISTENT in style from item to item

5. Write your annotation for each cited work

*Modified from  "Write an Annotated Bibliography" a LibGuide available at UC Santa Cruz Library. Content available via the Creative Commons Licence

Components of a Annotated Bibliography

An annotated bibliography should include some of the following components:

  • an explanation of the main purpose of the cited work
  • a brief description of the work's format and content
  • a comment on the author's argument
  • the author's academic credentials
  • the cited work's intended audience
  • a comment on the significance of the work and its value to the scholarship of the topic
  • a comment on any bias or gaps in the cited work
  • any noteworthy items about the work (eg. glossary, appendices, helpful index)
  • your own views about the cited work

 

*Modified from  "Write a Literature Review" a LibGuide available at UC Santa Cruz Library. Content available via the Creative Commons Licence

How to write an Annotated Bibliography?

Writing an Annotated Bibliography -From the University of Toronto Writing Centre

How to Write an Annotated Bibliography - From Concordia University