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HPS 319 Research: History of Medicine II: 17th–20th Century

This guide is intended to assist students in Prof. Lucia Dacome's HPS 319 course.

Steps to Help Start Your Research

Steps to help you get started with your research:

  1. Look at the Works Cited, Further Readings, and Bibliographies of related course readings to see if additional, relevant works are listed. Try to find those works in the UofT Library (UTL) system. Then check the works cited, further readings and bibliographies of those works, etc.
     
  2. Use the Subjects A-Z guides to find relevant Reference Sources. Look up your topic and/or time period in order to find contextual information. This information can provide keywords, terminology, people, places, events, chronology, document titles, further readings, etc. 
     
  3. Use this contextual information to search the Library Catalogue for relevant publications on your emerging ideas. Search by author, title, keywords, etc.  
     
  4. Look at the Subjects in the Library Catalogue record of relevant publications. They can help you to refine your search terms and clarify your ideas. To find primary sources, you can: look at and/or sort by Date of Publication; and/or, add keywords such as: Report, Letter, Diary, Lecture, Correspondence, Works, Sources, etc.
     
  5. You can search Text Collections for primary sources. In order to find Text Collections related to your topic, look at “Historical Periodicals” and/or  “Primary Sources/Texts” in the following Research Guides: HPS319 History of Medicine II: 17th-20th century ; History Research 
  6. You can search for secondary sources by using a relevant Article Database. In order to find relevant databases, look at the guides under Subjects A-Z on the UTL home page. Choose a relevant subject such as: 
    History – General;   Interdisciplinary;   History of Science and Medicine

You can use the variety of resources and search techniques listed on this page to find primary and secondary sources that will help you research your thesis/assertion and develop, situate, and substantiate your argument.