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VIC171Y: Methodology, theory & Practice in the Natural Sciences

Reading with a Purpose

Reading to Write: About Previewing
Leora Freedman, University of Toronto Writing Centre

Before delving into the text you are assigned to review, it is helpful to preview the text for subject matter and other clues. This introduction clearly explains the parts of a text to examine.

Critical Reading Towards Critical Writing
Deborah Knott, U of T Writing Centre

A short but thorough introduction to developing skills related to close, critical reading and how they can used to write critical interpretations of texts.

Dealing with New Words
Margaret Procter, U of T Writing Centre

As you are reading your chosen book, you may encounter unfamiliar terms, but pausing to consult a dictionary interrupts your reading. This helpful advice contains instruction on how to best guess the meaning of new words.

Writing an Annotated Bibliography

Write an Annotated Bibliography
University of Guelph McLaughlin Library

A helpful guide to compiling annotated bibliographies, illustrated with examples of annotations. It contains a note-taking worksheet to help you record essential information from different types of publications, which can be used to write an annotation for each source in your bibliography.

Writing an Annotated Bibliography
Deborah Knott, U of T Writing Centre

A detailed introduction to the purpose, structure and organization of annotated bibliography assignments. It includes advice on selecting sources as well as helpful tips on analyzing and summarizing arguments they contain.

Writing a Critical Review

How to Write Critical Reviews
The Writing Centre, University of Wisconsin-Madison

In-depth advice on writing critical reviews, from understanding the assignment description, writing an introduction, and composing a conclusion. Also includes a set of guiding questions to consider when reading an article being reviewed.

Writing a Critical Review
Allyson Skene, U of T at Scarborough Writing Centre

Outlines three steps involved in writing a critical review: reading, analyzing, and writing. Also explains using appropriate criteria for evaluating articles.

Writing a Literature Review

Write a Literature Review
University of Guelph McLaughlin Library

A good (but brief) overview to the purpose, structure, and content of literature reviews. Also consult the additional resources listed below.

The Literature Review: A Few Tips On Conducting It
Dena Taylor, U of T Health Sciences Writing Centre

Includes a set of guiding questions to consider when reading and evaluating books, journal articles, and other publications that form part of your literature review.

An Introduction to Literature Reviews
Eric Jensen, University of Warwick and Charles Laurie, Verisk Maplecroft

The video includes advice on the structure and content of literature reviews and their role within scientific research. It was produced by SAGE Publications, an academic publisher of books and journals in the sciences and social sciences.

A transcript of the video is available and can be downloaded in the PDF format.

Writing Handbook & Advice

Vaughn, L., & McIntosh, J.S. (2013). Writing philosophy: A guide for Canadian students (2nd. ed). Oxford University Press.

An excellent, concise guide to writing philosophy papers. It includes information on identifying and evaluating philosophical arguments, supporting and defending a thesis, using, quoting, and documenting sources, and other topics.

Writing at the University of Toronto

Includes helpful advice on all aspects of academic writing, from incorporating and citing sources to revising your work. The resource also contains information on specific types of writing in numerous disciplines, including philosophy.