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CLA360HUTM Early Greece

A guide to assist students in this course.

Primary Sources

Classics uses a specialized, precise method of citing ancient sources. 

Literary Primary Sources

The proper format for citing classical texts is:

For prose: Author, Title Book.Chapter.Section  

e.g. Arrian, Campaigns of Alexander 1.5.3

For poetry: Author, Title Book(if applicable).line number      

e.g. Homer, Iliad 18.141-143; Sophocles, Antigone 904-922

You must give the precise reference to the original literary text (book number, chapter number, section/line number), NOT just a page reference to your modern translation.   

If an author wrote only one work, you may omit the name of the work;

e.g. Herodotus 9.1, rather than Herodotus, Histories 9.1

Note: If you are including a parenthetical citation at the end of a sentence, e.g. (Homer, Odyssey 1.1-3), the period always follows the citation.

 

Visual Primary Sources

The proper format for citing classical artworks is:

Artists’ name . Title of work. Date of composition BCE/CE (if unknown use n.d.). Original findspot (if known), now Current museum location or collection, (if known), city of collection or museum. Inventory or Accession number.

You must also cite your resource:

Online:

Name of database or Web site. Web. Date of access.

Print:

Book as above.

Examples:

Unknown. Head of Homer, c. first century BCE or first century CE.  Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Inv. 04.13.  Photo: © 2007 Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Unknown. Spinario, c. second century BCE.  From Priene, now Staatliche Museum, Berlin. Inv. 8626.  Photo: after Higgins (1967) 120, pl. 58A

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is a serious offense, whether committed intentionally or not.   

See the following links for definitions of plagiarism and how you can avoid it:

Writing Help