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CIN201: Film Cultures 1: Art & Industry

A comprehensive guide to scholarly resources - books, journal articles, primary source material.

Where to Find Journal Articles

Multi-discipline databases

Film-specific databases

  • The American Film Institute (AFI) Catalog. Coverage: American cinema from 1893 to 1975, with full or short records for films from 1976 to present. Use the AFI Catalog to find detailed production information about specific films (incl. release dates and other production-related information), as well as citations to contemporaneous reviews from newspapers (e.g., New York Times); trade & industry publications (Variety); popular magazines (Motion Picture Herald, Photoplay); and review publications (Monthly Film Bulletin), among others. Note: There are no direct links to online content from Film Index International. See How to Find Journal Articles below, for instructions on how to use a citation to find a journal article.
  • Film Index International (British Film Institute). Coverage: 1900 - current. The directors selected for inclusion are a) those who have made a fiction film shown theatrically that is over 50 minutes in duration, released between 1928 and 1965, and b) those who have made a fiction film over 60 minutes in duration, post-1965. Note: There are no direct links to online content from Film Index International. See How to Find Journal Articles below, for instructions on how to use a citation to find a journal article.
  • International Index to Film Periodicals (1972+) Search by keyword, separating each word or phrase by AND
  • Film & Television Literature Index (1913-current)
  • Film Literature Index (1976-2001).

How to Find Journal Articles

Strategies to find journals articles

In broad terms, finding journal articles is a a 3-step process:

  1. Select a journal article database;
  2. Enter your search terms to find citations to journal articles.
  3. Once you've found a citation that interests you, find the article, either online or in print form.

What is a citation?

A citation provides the information you need to track down the source; it may refer to a journal article, a book, an article/chapter in a book, an Internet document, a review, a newspaper article, etc. A citation usually includes:

  • the title of the article (chapter, book, etc.)
  • the author of the article
  • the title of the journal in which the article appears (or book in which the chapter appears, etc.)
  • the article’s publication information (volume, issue, date, page numbers)
  • and often an abstract, or short description, of the article. Select 'Details' or 'Preview' (depending on the particular database) to view the abstract.

Using a citaton to find a journal article

Often, for any number of reasons, you may find it impossible to gain direct access to the online fulltext version of an article from within a particular database; or it may simply not be available in an online version. Don't panic: In the first case, it is likely that an online version is available via an alternate route, or from another source, within the Uof T Library's collection; in the second case, the article you want is likely available in a print vesion.  Using the information found in the citation (above), do the following:

Go to UTCat:

  • Enter the title of the journal, NOT the title of the article, in the search box
  • Choose Journal Title from  the drop-down menu
  • If the Library subscribes to the journal (print and/or online), it will appear here, with a link to the online version (if available), as well as details about the extent (volumes, issues, dates, etc.) of the Library's print and/or online holdings.

Note: As far as print versions of a journal are concerned, at Robarts, current issues (most recent 2-3 yrs) of journals are arranged alphabetically by title, and shelved in the the 4th flr. Periodicals Room; older issues are shelved among the books in the stacks and require the journal's Call Number (found along with the item record in UTCat).  In almost all other UofT Libraries, print journals are shelved alphabetically by title.